Abdominal Pain News and Research RSS Feed - Abdominal Pain News and Research

Abdominal pain is traditionally described by its chronicity (acute or chronic), its progression over time, its nature (sharp, dull, colicky), its distribution (by various methods, such as abdominal quadrant (left upper quadrant, left lower quadrant, right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant) or other methods that divide the abdomen into nine sections), and by characterization of the factors that make it worse, or alleviate it.
Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers develop minimally invasive techniques to treat plastic bronchitis

Pediatric researchers have devised an innovative, safe and minimally invasive procedure that helps relieve rare but potentially life-threatening airway blockages occurring in children who had surgery for congenital heart defects. [More]
Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

A non-invasive test to diagnose and monitor an inflammatory disease that injures the esophagus - called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE - would replace the need for repeated endoscopy for a growing number of children and adults with this relatively new condition. [More]
Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Scientists want to know whether taking antibiotics early in life can disrupt your immune system function lifelong. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
Sleep problems predict chronic pain in emerging adults

Sleep problems predict chronic pain in emerging adults

For at least some groups of "emerging adults," sleep problems are a predictor of chronic pain and worsening pain severity over time, suggests a study in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]
UCI researchers get $8 million to help develop new vaccine for Q fever

UCI researchers get $8 million to help develop new vaccine for Q fever

A University of California, Irvine scientific team led by infectious diseases researchers Philip Felgner and Aaron Esser-Kahn has received $8 million from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency to help develop a new vaccine for Q fever. [More]
Most patients prefer portable media devices to face-to-face consultation when discussing surgery

Most patients prefer portable media devices to face-to-face consultation when discussing surgery

Often patients undergo procedures without real informed consent being achieved due to technical language, jargon and time pressure, with up to half of patients finding it difficult to understand what their doctor tells them. Now a group of Australian doctors has prepared patients for surgery using iPads, and found that patients' understanding was much better than after a face-to-face consultation. [More]
Simple method to determine prevalence of celiac disease in children aged 2-4

Simple method to determine prevalence of celiac disease in children aged 2-4

Researchers from the University of Granada have developed a new, simple and non invasive method which allows to determine whether a child aged 2-4 suffers from celiac disease or not without the necessity of a blood extraction. [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Out-of-towners using marijuana in Colorado end up in emergency room

Out-of-towners using marijuana in Colorado end up in emergency room

Out-of-towners using marijuana in Colorado -- which has legally allowed sales of the drug in retail dispensaries since 2014 -- are ending up in the emergency room at an increasing rate, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Colorado School of Medicine. [More]
Study finds no evidence of lactase deficiency specific to autistic children with GI symptoms

Study finds no evidence of lactase deficiency specific to autistic children with GI symptoms

Children with autism have no unique pattern of abnormal results on endoscopy or other tests for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, compared to non-autistic children with GI symptoms, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. [More]
Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be successfully treated with endovascular therapy such as balloon angioplasty, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. The study also found that AMI is a more common cause of abdominal pain among the elderly than generally thought; however, it is difficult to diagnose before bowel damage develops. [More]
UMMC surgeons develop a program to direct critically ill patients to appropriate treatment location

UMMC surgeons develop a program to direct critically ill patients to appropriate treatment location

A team of surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center has developed a program that utilizes its Shock Trauma Center (STC) model to direct critically ill non-trauma patients to the appropriate treatment location and get them into an operating room and hospital intensive care unit (ICU) bed as quickly as possible. [More]
Study: Migraine, tension-type headaches may share genetic links with IBS

Study: Migraine, tension-type headaches may share genetic links with IBS

Migraine and tension-type headaches may share genetic links with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 68th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, April 15 to 21, 2016. [More]
Naldemedine significantly improves opioid-induced constipation in patients with chronic non-cancer pain

Naldemedine significantly improves opioid-induced constipation in patients with chronic non-cancer pain

Shionogi today announced pivotal phase III study (COMPOSE I) results showing that once-daily treatment with naldemedine significantly improved opioid-induced constipation (OIC) compared to placebo in patients with chronic non-cancer pain. [More]
Vinegar could help fight ulcerative colitis

Vinegar could help fight ulcerative colitis

Vinegar is the perfect ingredient for making tangy sauces and dressings. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that the popular liquid could also help fight ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease that research suggests is related to the gut microbiome. [More]
Discovery takes researchers one step closer to preventing C. diff

Discovery takes researchers one step closer to preventing C. diff

Exposure to specific antibiotics is linked to the development of certain strains of antibiotic-resistant C. difficile, one of the fastest growing bacteria superbugs, according to a new study published by Stuart Johnson, MD, of Loyola University Health System, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and the Hines VA Medical Hospital. [More]
Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Researchers use new method to assess quality of colonoscopies performed in outpatient facilities

Colonoscopies are now a routine preventive diagnostic test for millions of Americans each year. While rates are low, complications like perforation, bleeding, and anesthesia-related heart failure can occur. Yale School of Medicine researchers have now developed a quality measure that uses follow-up hospital visits to track the variation in colonoscopy quality among outpatient facilities. [More]
Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai's Halaven receives FDA approval for treatment of patients with metastatic liposarcoma

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Halaven (eribulin mesylate) Injection (0.5 mg per mL) for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic liposarcoma who have received a prior anthracycline-containing regimen. [More]
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