Abdominal Pain News and Research RSS Feed - Abdominal Pain News and Research

Abdominal pain is traditionally described by its chronicity (acute or chronic), its progression over time, its nature (sharp, dull, colicky), its distribution (by various methods, such as abdominal quadrant (left upper quadrant, left lower quadrant, right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant) or other methods that divide the abdomen into nine sections), and by characterization of the factors that make it worse, or alleviate it.
Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

Study shows clinical and psychosocial consequences following survival of Ebola infection

The long-term clinical and social sequelae following survival of Ebola infection are unknown. [More]
Researchers develop new imaging and catheterization technique to treat adults with lymphatic plastic bronchitis

Researchers develop new imaging and catheterization technique to treat adults with lymphatic plastic bronchitis

Researchers who developed a safe and effective procedure to remove thick clogs in children's airways are now reporting similar success in adult patients. In this rare condition, called plastic bronchitis, patients develop thick, caulk-like casts that form in the branching paths of their airways. [More]
New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

New US guidelines developed for the prevention of peanut allergy

Recommendations for introducing peanut-containing foods to infants, compiled by an expert panel sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, were published this week. The guidelines are intended to help prevent the development of peanut allergy. They provide specific recommendations for infants with differing risk levels for developing peanut allergy. [More]
Genomic sequencing reveals new insights into major shigellosis outbreaks in California

Genomic sequencing reveals new insights into major shigellosis outbreaks in California

In a study that could have significant impact on how disease outbreaks are managed, researchers at UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei (S. sonnei) bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015. [More]
Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

Researchers use DNA markers to differentiate harmless species from deadly bacteria

The virulent pathogen that causes the disease tularemia, or "rabbit fever," was weaponized during past world wars and is considered a potential bioweapon. [More]
FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. [More]
New study shows link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS

New study shows link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large portion of the general population. New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet now shows a link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS. [More]
Arthritis drug induces response and remission in patients with Crohn's disease, study finds

Arthritis drug induces response and remission in patients with Crohn's disease, study finds

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ustekinumab, a human antibody used to treat arthritis, significantly induces response and remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease. [More]
Study offers new insight into why some women have difficulty in falling pregnant

Study offers new insight into why some women have difficulty in falling pregnant

Southampton researchers have found new insight into why some women have difficulty falling pregnant. [More]
Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

IBS is a common medical condition which is diagnosed in the presence of characteristic gastrointestinal symptoms including recurring bouts of abdominal pain and diarrhea and/or constipation. IBS patients also commonly report bloating and abdominal distension or swelling. [More]
TTUHSC El Paso investigators receive $1.8 million grant to support digestive disorder research

TTUHSC El Paso investigators receive $1.8 million grant to support digestive disorder research

Co-principal investigators Richard McCallum, M.D., and Irene Sarosiek, M.D., have received a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [More]
Value of cranberries in prevention of urinary infections is disproved

Value of cranberries in prevention of urinary infections is disproved

A study conducted by Yale University has shown that cranberries do not reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the presence of microbial pathogens within the kidneys, bladder or urethra and is considered to be the most common bacterial infection. [More]
FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Lartruvo (olaratumab) with doxorubicin to treat adults with certain types of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), which are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons or other soft tissues. [More]
New report underscores personal and economic impact of IBS

New report underscores personal and economic impact of IBS

A multi-disciplinary expert group calls for greater attention to be paid to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) to bring it out of the shadows. The IBS Global Impact Report is launched at United European Gastroenterology Week and examines published studies on the direct and indirect costs of IBS. [More]
Researchers unravel mystery of first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S.

Researchers unravel mystery of first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S.

The first Zika virus-related death in the continental U.S. occurred in June of this year, but even now, months later, two aspects of this case continue to puzzle health experts. [More]
Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Up to 6 years after receiving a single treatment with the gene therapy product lipoprotein lipase (LPL), patients with the debilitating genetic disease LPL deficiency (LPLD) had about 50% fewer episodes of pancreatitis than before receiving the treatment. [More]
Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team of international researchers has for the first time identified a fungus as a key factor in the development of Crohn's disease. [More]
Research strongly links smoking to bowel condition relapses

Research strongly links smoking to bowel condition relapses

Smoking is strongly linked to relapse of a serious bowel condition, research has confirmed. [More]
Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Cases of rotavirus infections fall by 84% thanks to vaccination

Figures published by Public Health England have shown that the number of diagnosed Rotavirus cases, a highly infectious virus which may cause vomiting and diarrhoea, have dropped by 84% since the introduction of a vaccine to the national childhood immunisation schedule in July 2013. [More]
Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower cognitive response times, study shows

New research published in the UEG Journal1 has found that Crohn's disease sufferers experience slower response times than matched individuals that do not have the disease. [More]
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