Abdominal Pain News and Research RSS Feed - Abdominal Pain News and Research

Abdominal pain is traditionally described by its chronicity (acute or chronic), its progression over time, its nature (sharp, dull, colicky), its distribution (by various methods, such as abdominal quadrant (left upper quadrant, left lower quadrant, right upper quadrant, right lower quadrant) or other methods that divide the abdomen into nine sections), and by characterization of the factors that make it worse, or alleviate it.
Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Aptensio XR once-daily treatment for ADHD to be available in Summer 2015

Today, Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P. announced that Aptensio XR, a once-daily central nervous system stimulant indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) will be available to patients beginning Summer 2015. [More]
Ardelyx reports positive results from tenapanor Phase 2b clinical trial in IBS-C patients

Ardelyx reports positive results from tenapanor Phase 2b clinical trial in IBS-C patients

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on cardio-renal, gastrointestinal, and metabolic diseases, today presented Phase 2b clinical trial results that demonstrated statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in IBS-C symptoms for tenapanor-treated patients compared to patients receiving placebo. [More]
Naldemedine shows promise in treating OIC in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

Naldemedine shows promise in treating OIC in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

Shionogi Inc. today announced data from a Phase IIb study that showed 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg of naldemedine demonstrated statistically significant efficacy in treating opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in patients with chronic non-cancer pain. [More]
UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company focusing on immunology and neurology treatment and research, is sponsoring several data presentations on Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) at Digestive Disease Week 2015, taking place in Washington, DC from May 16-19. [More]
Simple blood tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome quickly and accurately

Simple blood tests diagnose irritable bowel syndrome quickly and accurately

Millions of people afflicted by irritable bowel syndrome can now be diagnosed quickly and accurately with two simple blood tests developed by a Cedars-Sinai gastroenterologist. [More]
Research finding could lead to better treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

Research finding could lead to better treatments for inflammatory bowel disease

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) afflicts 1.6 million people in the United States, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, rectal bleeding and other potentially debilitating symptoms. [More]
Treatment significantly reduces risk of CDI recurrence

Treatment significantly reduces risk of CDI recurrence

Among patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) who recovered following standard treatment with the antibiotics metronidazole or vancomycin, oral administration of spores of a strain of C difficile that does not produce toxins colonized the gastrointestinal tract and significantly reduced CDI recurrence, according to a study in the May 5 issue of JAMA. [More]
Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

A pilot study has found that participating in a nine-week training program including elicitation of the relaxation response had a significant impact on clinical symptoms of the gastrointestinal disorders irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on the expression of genes related to inflammation and the body's response to stress. [More]
Applying palliative care principles to transform geriatric emergency care may reduce hospital admissions

Applying palliative care principles to transform geriatric emergency care may reduce hospital admissions

Applying palliative care principles to emergency departments may reduce the number of geriatric patients admitted to intensive care units, possibly extending lives and reducing Medicare costs, according to a three-year analysis by Mount Sinai researchers set to be published in the May edition of Health Affairs, which can be found online. [More]
New study finds that sexual function in adult living donors lower at three months after transplant

New study finds that sexual function in adult living donors lower at three months after transplant

A new study found that sexual function in adult living donors was lower at the evaluation phase and at three months following liver transplantation. Results published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, suggest that donor education prior to surgery may improve recovery and ease concerns about sexual function following the transplant. [More]
Shadowing helps clinicians achieve ideal patient care experiences

Shadowing helps clinicians achieve ideal patient care experiences

Patient-centered care is best achieved when the care team understands every moment of the patient and family experience in their journeys through a health care system - from parking in the hospital garage to being treated in the intensive care unit. This is the core value of a novel quality improvement program implemented at a leading U.S. medical center and presented today at the National Quality Summit, sponsored by the National Association for Healthcare Quality. [More]
Positive CHMP opinion recommends RELISTOR for treatment of opioid-induced constipation

Positive CHMP opinion recommends RELISTOR for treatment of opioid-induced constipation

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. and Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency has adopted a positive opinion recommending a new indication for RELISTOR (methylnaltrexone bromide) Subcutaneous Injection for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) when response to laxative therapy has not been sufficient in adult patients, aged 18 years and older. [More]
Phase 2 IMAGO trial of SHP625 fails to meet primary endpoints in pediatric patients with ALGS

Phase 2 IMAGO trial of SHP625 fails to meet primary endpoints in pediatric patients with ALGS

Shire plc today announced that the 13-week Phase 2 IMAGO trial of its investigational compound SHP625 (LUM001) did not meet the primary or secondary endpoints in the study of 20 pediatric patients with Alagille syndrome (ALGS), a rare, life-threatening genetic disorder that presents with chronic cholestasis (accumulation of bile acids in the liver) and severe pruritus (itching). [More]
Rhythm, Actavis announce initiation of relamorelin Phase 2b trial for treatment of diabetic gastroparesis

Rhythm, Actavis announce initiation of relamorelin Phase 2b trial for treatment of diabetic gastroparesis

Rhythm, a biopharmaceutical company, and Actavis plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, announced today the initiation of a Phase 2b clinical trial assessing the efficacy and safety of relamorelin (RM-131), Rhythm's ghrelin agonist, for the treatment of gastroparesis in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Study examines new Ebola Prediction Score

Study examines new Ebola Prediction Score

Abdominal pain, fever and unexplained bleeding - which are commonly believed to indicate infection with the Ebola virus -- are not significantly predictive of the disease, according to the results of a study examining a new Ebola Prediction Score published online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Derivation and Internal Validation of the Ebola Prediction Score for Risk Stratification of Patients with Suspected Ebola Virus Disease"). [More]
Rhode Island Hospital physician comes up with new diagnostic tool for Ebola virus

Rhode Island Hospital physician comes up with new diagnostic tool for Ebola virus

Adam C. Levine, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital who treated Ebola-infected patients in Liberia last year, used his field experience to create a tool to determine the likelihood that patients presenting with Ebola symptoms will actually carry the virus. [More]
Clinical trial uses personalized cellular therapy to treat GVHD complication of bone marrow transplant

Clinical trial uses personalized cellular therapy to treat GVHD complication of bone marrow transplant

An innovative clinical trial using the science of "personalized" cellular therapy has begun enrolling children and adults suffering from graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD), a life-threatening complication of bone marrow transplantation in which donor immune lymphocytes attack the organs of the bone marrow transplant recipient. [More]
International travelers bring multidrug-resistant shigellosis to the US

International travelers bring multidrug-resistant shigellosis to the US

International travelers are bringing a multidrug-resistant intestinal illness to the United States and spreading it to others who have not traveled, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). [More]
MOVANTIK (naloxegol) now available in U.S. for treatment of OIC in adult patients with non-cancer pain

MOVANTIK (naloxegol) now available in U.S. for treatment of OIC in adult patients with non-cancer pain

Nektar Therapeutics reported that partner AstraZeneca announced today that MOVANTIK (naloxegol) has launched in the United States. On September 16, 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved MOVANTIK as the first once-daily oral peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) medication for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in adult patients with chronic, non-cancer pain. [More]
Ultrasound safer than other imaging modalities for imaging female pelvis, say OB/GYN experts

Ultrasound safer than other imaging modalities for imaging female pelvis, say OB/GYN experts

Ultrasound technology has evolved dramatically in recent years. A group of noted obstetricians and gynecologists maintain that ultrasound is more cost-effective and safer than other imaging modalities for imaging the female pelvis and should be the first imaging modality used for patients with pelvic symptoms. [More]
Advertisement