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Bands of scar tissue that join two parts of tissue together that would otherwise not be physiologically joined together constitute adhesions. These abnormal connections have a plastic wrap appearance. They appear like thin sheets or thicker fibrous bands.
PregLem announces exclusive in licensing agreement with Merck Serono for Bentamapimod

PregLem announces exclusive in licensing agreement with Merck Serono for Bentamapimod

PregLem, the Swiss specialty biopharmaceutical company focused on women's reproductive medicine, announces a world-wide, exclusive in licensing agreement for Bentamapimod, a novel, orally active, Jun Kinase Inhibitor from Merck Serono for an undisclosed amount. PregLem will develop the compound for the prevention of post-surgical abdominal adhesions and endometriosis in patients with tubal ligation or comparable effective contraception. [More]
Pregabalin reduces abdominal pain and improves sleep in women with adhesions

Pregabalin reduces abdominal pain and improves sleep in women with adhesions

Pregabalin, FDA-approved for neuropathic pain (pain caused by shingles and peripheral neuropathy), effectively reduced abdominal pain and improved sleep in women with adhesions, according to a Henry Ford study. [More]
Link between peritoneum closure and fewer adhesions

Link between peritoneum closure and fewer adhesions

A controversial surgical procedure that has lost favor among medical professionals may benefit women who have had caesarean sections. So say researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, who have found that closing the parietal peritoneum, a multi-layered membrane that lines the abdomino-pelvic walls, substantially decreases the likelihood of scarring that can make future C-sections more difficult. [More]
Painful surgical adhesions may be preventable by taking the COX-2 inhibitor Celebrex

Painful surgical adhesions may be preventable by taking the COX-2 inhibitor Celebrex

Adhesions – bands of scar tissue that bind together two internal body surfaces – develop in 55 percent to more than 90 percent of patients undergoing surgery, depending on the type of operation. They are part of normal healing, but when surfaces fuse together that shouldn't, serious pain and complications can result. [More]
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