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Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Blocking molecular signaling pathway could prevent or reverse peripheral neuropathy

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the University of Manitoba and St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre in Canada, have identified a molecular signaling pathway that, when blocked, promotes sensory neuron growth and prevents or reverses peripheral neuropathy in cell and rodent models of type 1 and 2 diabetes, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy and HIV. [More]
Anticholinergic drugs linked to increased rate of emergency department and hospital visits

Anticholinergic drugs linked to increased rate of emergency department and hospital visits

Anticholinergic medications, a class of drugs very commonly used by older adults, are linked to an increased rate of emergency department and hospital utilization in the United States, according to an Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Indiana University Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, and Regenstrief Institute study of community-dwelling Americans age 65 and older. [More]
Overexpression of nerve growth factor drives gastric tumorigenesis in mice

Overexpression of nerve growth factor drives gastric tumorigenesis in mice

Gastric tumors are started by specialized cells in the stomach that signal nerves to make more acetylcholine, according to a study in mice. [More]
Karolinska Institutet researchers find solutions for nerve stimulation

Karolinska Institutet researchers find solutions for nerve stimulation

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a method for producing flexible plastic electrodes capable of releasing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine upon an electrical trigger. [More]
Research provides new insight into how diseases that disconnect brain and body occur

Research provides new insight into how diseases that disconnect brain and body occur

A huge colony of receptors must be optimally positioned and functioning on our muscle cells for our brains to talk with our bodies so we can walk and breathe. [More]
Research sheds new light on how humans learn to behave under uncertainty

Research sheds new light on how humans learn to behave under uncertainty

New research has revealed how three important brain signaling chemicals affect the way that we handle uncertainty. [More]
Carotenoid pigment compound reduces invasiveness of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer

Carotenoid pigment compound reduces invasiveness of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer

Beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX), a carotenoid pigment compound found primarily in plants, reduces the number and invasiveness of tumors in mouse and cell models of lung cancer, report scientists from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. [More]
Scientists reveal molecular elements that bridge anxiety and metabolism

Scientists reveal molecular elements that bridge anxiety and metabolism

Metabolic and anxiety-related disorders both pose a significant healthcare burden, and are in the spotlight of contemporary research and therapeutic efforts. Although intuitively we assume that these two phenomena overlap, the link has not been proven scientifically. [More]
Researchers reveal previously unknown role of glutamate in neuromuscular development

Researchers reveal previously unknown role of glutamate in neuromuscular development

For decades, scientists thought acetylcholine was the only neurotransmitter responsible for controlling how muscles and nerves are wired together during development. [More]
Scientists uncover new role of ChAT enzyme in regulating blood pressure

Scientists uncover new role of ChAT enzyme in regulating blood pressure

In a study published today in the prestigious journal Nature Biotechnology, scientists from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Karolinska Institutet discovered that T-cells capable of producing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine can regulate blood pressure. [More]
Researchers use unique computational approach to identify promising drug leads for heart diseases

Researchers use unique computational approach to identify promising drug leads for heart diseases

Using a unique computational approach to rapidly sample, in millisecond time intervals, proteins in their natural state of gyrating, bobbing, and weaving, a research team from UC San Diego and Monash University in Australia has identified promising drug leads that may selectively combat heart disease, from arrhythmias to cardiac failure. [More]
Researchers reveal novel link between nicotine and inflammation

Researchers reveal novel link between nicotine and inflammation

An Umeå-based team in collaboration with US researchers reveals a new link between nicotine and inflammation. [More]
Nicotinic receptors could be new therapeutic target to prevent memory loss linked to Alzheimer's

Nicotinic receptors could be new therapeutic target to prevent memory loss linked to Alzheimer's

Several scientific studies have indicated that nicotine may be beneficial for memory function. [More]
Scientists discover key cellular mechanism behind side-effects of antipsychotics

Scientists discover key cellular mechanism behind side-effects of antipsychotics

Since their development in the 1950s, antipsychotic drugs have been widely used to treat psychoses and neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia. A debilitating side-effect of these drugs called parkinsonism limits their efficacy. [More]
Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. [More]
Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their demonstrated role in processes underlying cognition such as synaptic facilitation, and theta and gamma wave activity. [More]
Nutritional supplements can enhance effectiveness of antidepressants

Nutritional supplements can enhance effectiveness of antidepressants

An international evidence review has found that certain nutritional supplements can increase the effectiveness of antidepressants for people with clinical depression. [More]
FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is spearheading the South Florida site for the first U.S. clinical trial for Lewy body dementia (LBD), the second-most common dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The HEADWAY-DLB is a phase 2b multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate an investigational medicine, RVT-101, for dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
Scientists identify unique memory suppressor gene that could provide clues for new Alzheimer’s disease treatments

Scientists identify unique memory suppressor gene that could provide clues for new Alzheimer’s disease treatments

While research has identified hundreds of genes required for normal memory formation, genes that suppress memory are of special interest because they offer insights into how the brain prioritizes and manages all of the information, including memories, that it takes in every day. [More]
Study explores two new antibodies believed to cause myasthenia gravis

Study explores two new antibodies believed to cause myasthenia gravis

A study of patients from across the nation with myasthenia gravis is helping determine the incidence of two new antibodies believed to cause the disease, and whether these patients need different treatment strategies. [More]
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