Acinetobacter News and Research RSS Feed - Acinetobacter News and Research

International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

Airports are international travel hubs visited by large numbers of people. London Heathrow, for example, has an average of 205,400 travellers every day and saw 75 million people arriving and departing from all over the world in 2015. [More]
Bad bugs spread from ICU patients to nurses' scrubs, research shows

Bad bugs spread from ICU patients to nurses' scrubs, research shows

Bad bugs readily spread from patients in the intensive care unit to nurses' scrubs and the room, according to research being presented at IDWeek 2016. The sleeves and pockets of the scrubs and the bed railing were the most likely to be contaminated. [More]
New portable adhesive patch drives small electrical current to promote wound healing

New portable adhesive patch drives small electrical current to promote wound healing

Good news for the millions of people who suffer from skin wounds that won't heal. A team of researchers at The Ohio State University has brought a potentially transformative solution to the problem by creating a portable adhesive patch that drives a continuous, small electrical current to stimulate healing and reduce the risk of infection. [More]
Microbes detected in Boston subway system have low pathogenic potential, study shows

Microbes detected in Boston subway system have low pathogenic potential, study shows

Boston's subway system, known as the T, might be just as bacteria-laden as you'd expect but organisms found there are largely from normal human skin and incapable of causing disease, according to a study published June 28 in mSystems, an open access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Knocking out genes in E. coli affects stiffness, integrity of bacterial envelope

Knocking out genes in E. coli affects stiffness, integrity of bacterial envelope

An exhaustive look at how bacteria hold their ground and avoid getting pushed around by their environment shows how dozens of genes aid the essential job of protecting cells from popping when tensions run high. [More]
Tiny molecular scaffolding could be key to fight against antibiotic resistance

Tiny molecular scaffolding could be key to fight against antibiotic resistance

Tiny molecular scaffolding that joins molecules together could be the key to our battle against antibiotic resistance. Research published in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters shows that carbon nanodot scaffolding assembled with small molecules called polyamines can kill some dangerous drug-resistant bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumanii and Klebsiella pneumonia. [More]
MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has developed a device with the potential of shortening the time required to rapidly diagnose pathogens responsible for health-care-associated infections from a couple of days to a matter of hours. [More]
Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Tackling superbugs with antibiotic resistance breakers: an interview with Professor Colin Garner, Chief Executive, Antibiotic Research UK

Superbugs – or to give them their correct name, antibiotic resistant bacteria – arise on repeated exposure to antibiotics. In any population of bacteria there will be a few that are antibiotic resistant (approximately 1 in 100 million bacteria). If these bacteria are allowed to grow and multiply, an antibiotic resistant infection results. [More]
Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

A research team led by University of Arkansas chemist Jingyi Chen and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences microbiologist Mark Smeltzer has developed an alternative therapeutic approach to fighting antibiotic-resistant infections. [More]
Anti-biofilm compounds show promise against drug-resistant bacteria associated with hospital-acquired infections

Anti-biofilm compounds show promise against drug-resistant bacteria associated with hospital-acquired infections

Researchers at the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute and School of Public Health have discovered a new class of anti-biofilm compounds derived from marine microorganisms that show promise against a drug-resistant bacterium commonly associated with hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Naturally occurring clay exhibits potent antibacterial activity against ESKAPE pathogens

Naturally occurring clay exhibits potent antibacterial activity against ESKAPE pathogens

Naturally occurring clay from British Columbia, Canada -- long used by the region's Heiltsuk First Nation for its healing potential -- exhibits potent antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. [More]
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: an interview with Dr. Michael Dudley

Enterobacteriaceae refer to the family of bacteria such as E. coli and Klebsiella that are bacterial pathogens most frequently associated with hospital-acquired infections [More]
Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

Antivirulence antibiotics could evade resistance longer than traditional antibiotics

We've all seen the headlines. "Man found to be shedding virulent strain of polio"; "Virulent flu strain in Europe hits the economy"; "Most virulent strain of E. coli ever seen contains DNA sequences from plague bacteria." [More]
Forge Therapeutics obtains exclusive license to patent rights related to novel metalloprotein inhibitors

Forge Therapeutics obtains exclusive license to patent rights related to novel metalloprotein inhibitors

Forge Therapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company developing innovative medicines using a breakthrough drug discovery platform targeting metalloproteins, announced today it has obtained an exclusive license from the University of California San Diego to patent rights related to novel metalloprotein inhibitors discovered in the laboratory of Forge Therapeutics scientific co-founder Professor Seth Cohen, Ph.D. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
Cleaning patient rooms with combination of chemicals and UV light cuts transmission of superbugs

Cleaning patient rooms with combination of chemicals and UV light cuts transmission of superbugs

Healthcare facilities continue to battle drug-resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that loiter on surfaces even after patient rooms have been cleaned and can cause new, sometimes-deadly infections. [More]
New Locilex microbiology data presented at ICAAC/ICC 2015 scientific conference

New Locilex microbiology data presented at ICAAC/ICC 2015 scientific conference

Dipexium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a late-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of Locilex (pexiganan cream 0.8%), and research collaborators, JMI Laboratories, announced that new Locilex microbiology data were presented at the American Society for Microbiology's Interscience Conference of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy and International Society of Chemotherapy's International Congress of Chemotherapy and Infection (ICAAC/ICC 2015) scientific conference in San Diego, California, September 17-21, 2015. [More]
Combination of TXA709 and cefdinir demonstrates synergistic antibacterial activity against MRSA

Combination of TXA709 and cefdinir demonstrates synergistic antibacterial activity against MRSA

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, a drug-discovery company focused on developing a new class of antibiotic agents to treat life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, announced the presentation of results demonstrating the synergistic antibacterial activity of its lead clinical candidate, TXA709, when combined with cefdinir, a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic. [More]
Highly diluted acetic acid in vinegar can kill bacteria, prevent infection in burn wounds

Highly diluted acetic acid in vinegar can kill bacteria, prevent infection in burn wounds

Highly diluted acetic acid, an active ingredient of household vinegar, has been shown to be an effective alternative agent to prevent infection and kill bacteria found in burn wounds. [More]
Aridis' AR-301 granted FDA Fast Track Designation for treatment of pneumonia caused by S. aureus

Aridis' AR-301 granted FDA Fast Track Designation for treatment of pneumonia caused by S. aureus

Aridis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company applying proprietary technologies to produce novel anti-infectives and immunotherapies for infectious diseases, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted Fast Track Designation to AR-301, the Company's fully human anti-Staphylococcal alpha-toxin IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement