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Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

According to a study carried out at the University of Helsinki, an infection of the root tip of a tooth increases the risk of coronary artery disease, even if the infection is symptomless. [More]
St. Luke’s Emergency and Transport Services recognized for excellence

St. Luke’s Emergency and Transport Services recognized for excellence

St. Luke’s Emergency and Transport Services has received the American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline® EMS Silver Award for implementing quality improvement measures for the treatment of patients who experience severe heart attacks. [More]
miRNAs may improve risk prediction in CAD

miRNAs may improve risk prediction in CAD

Single microRNAs derived from peripheral blood predict cardiovascular mortality in patients with coronary artery disease, German research shows. [More]
Ticagrelor drug shows minor added benefit for patients with history of myocardial infarction

Ticagrelor drug shows minor added benefit for patients with history of myocardial infarction

The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care assessed the added benefit of ticagrelor for patients with acute coronary syndrome already in 2011 in its very first dossier assessment, just after the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products had come into force. [More]
Cardiac troponin test refines ACS rule-out process

Cardiac troponin test refines ACS rule-out process

Testing high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes reduces their need for cardiac stress testing and speeds their discharge from the emergency department, report researchers. [More]
'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

'Comprehensive' management approach needed for AF

Death is a bigger risk than stroke among patients with atrial fibrillation, particularly during the first 4 months after diagnosis, research shows. [More]
Sleep-disordered breathing increases cardiovascular risk in ACS patients

Sleep-disordered breathing increases cardiovascular risk in ACS patients

Sleep-disordered breathing is an important risk factor for major adverse cardiocerebrovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes, Japanese research shows. [More]
Mortality risk high among diabetes patients with prior CV events

Mortality risk high among diabetes patients with prior CV events

Patients with Type 2 diabetes and acute coronary syndromes have a substantially increased risk of death in the 18 months after hospital admission for subsequent major nonfatal cardiovascular events, US researchers report. [More]
Age no barrier to vorapaxar use in ACS

Age no barrier to vorapaxar use in ACS

The protease-activated receptor 1 inhibitor vorapaxar offers the same benefits to older and younger patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, shows further analysis of the TRACER trial. [More]
Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

Diabetes-heart disease combination can increase death risk

The combination of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease can be deadly. New research from a global study led by a physician from UConn Health has found that patients with Type 2 diabetes admitted into the hospital for congestive heart failure face a one in four chance of dying over the next 18 months. [More]
Rapid hand-held troponin blood test for heart attack diagnosis launched by Philips

Rapid hand-held troponin blood test for heart attack diagnosis launched by Philips

Chest pain patients presenting at the emergency department are set to benefit from a major development by Royal Philips. The company today announced that it has CE marked its cardiac troponin I (cTnI) blood test on the Minicare I-20 handheld device. Minicare cTnI delivers its lab comparable test results in less than 10 minutes near the patient, reducing the time for the physician to decide on treatment. [More]
Bare metal stents no longer advisable for high bleeding risk ACS patients

Bare metal stents no longer advisable for high bleeding risk ACS patients

A polymer-free, drug-coated stent gives markedly better outcomes than a bare metal stent in patients with acute coronary syndromes and risk factors for bleeding, report researchers. [More]
Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Doctors worried about dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing a coronary artery procedure— such as angioplasty to treat a heart attack — will often administer antiplatelet therapy to head off complications. [More]
SPRINT supports stringent BP goals for elderly

SPRINT supports stringent BP goals for elderly

Analysis of SPRINT participants older than 75 years shows that they too benefitted from an intensive blood pressure target of 120 mmHg. [More]
PCI with polymer-free BA9 drug-coated stent better than bare metal stent in ACS patients

PCI with polymer-free BA9 drug-coated stent better than bare metal stent in ACS patients

Patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) who are at high risk for bleeding have significantly lower rates of target lesion revascularisation and fewer adverse events after undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a polymer-free biolimus-A (BA9) drug-coated stent than with those receiving a bare metal stent (BMS) in results from a sub-study of the LEADERS FREE trial reported for the first time in a late-breaker session at EuroPCR 2016. [More]
CMR 'may be preferable' to SPECT for CHD prognosis

CMR 'may be preferable' to SPECT for CHD prognosis

Long-term follow-up of the CE-MARC study suggests that cardiovascular magnetic resonance could be a better predictor of cardiovascular events than single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with coronary heart disease. [More]
Younger women more likely to experience one-year adverse cardiovascular events after PCI

Younger women more likely to experience one-year adverse cardiovascular events after PCI

Women younger than 55 years of age who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are more likely to experience one-year adverse cardiovascular events due to risk factors such as diabetes and chronic kidney disease, yet they are less likely to receive potent antiplatelet therapy than men. The PROMETHEUS study found that outcomes for both men and women post-PCI are dependent on their baseline risk factors, not their sex. [More]
Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Cardiac troponin is a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for myocardial injury but concentrations in the blood rise over several hours after the onset of an acute myocardial infarction. [More]
Prompt attention may limit recurrence risk in TIA patients

Prompt attention may limit recurrence risk in TIA patients

Centres with procedures in place for the rapid assessment of patients with transient ischaemic attack or minor stroke achieve low recurrence rates in these patients, a multinational study shows. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
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