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Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

GlaxoSmithKline plc and Genmab A/S announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a Supplemental Biologic License Application (sBLA) for the use of Arzerra® (ofatumumab), a CD20-directed cytolytic monoclonal antibody, in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) for whom fludarabine-based therapy is considered inappropriate. [More]
Study: Men are more likely to receive faster care for heart attacks and angina than women

Study: Men are more likely to receive faster care for heart attacks and angina than women

A new study indicates that in younger adults experiencing heart attacks and angina, men are more likely to receive faster care compared with women. The study, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) also found that gender-related factors affected access to care for both men and women. [More]
Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks and strokes, shows study

Outbursts of anger may trigger heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular problems in the two hours immediately afterwards, according to the first study to systematically evaluate previous research into the link between the extreme emotion and all cardiovascular outcomes. [More]
Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Call it what you will - getting red in the face, hot under the collar, losing your cool, blowing your top - we all experience anger. And while we know that anger is a normal, sometimes even beneficial emotion, we're also aware of the often harmful connection between anger and health. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical shows an even more compelling reason to think about getting anger in check - a nearly fivefold increase in risk for heart attack in the two hours following outbursts of anger. [More]
Patients with dental extractions before cardiac surgery still at risk for poor outcomes

Patients with dental extractions before cardiac surgery still at risk for poor outcomes

To pull or not to pull? That is a common question when patients have the potentially dangerous combination of abscessed or infected teeth and the need for heart surgery. [More]
Studies find that depression makes people more likely to die from heart disease

Studies find that depression makes people more likely to die from heart disease

An extensive review of scientific literature indicates that depression should be added to the list of risk factors associated with heart disease. Others include obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and smoking. [More]

Cardiome Pharma's subsidiary signs agreement with Tamro to distribute BRINAVESS in Sweden

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that its subsidiary, Correvio GmbH, has entered into an agreement with Tamro AB, headquartered in Gothenburg, Sweden, to distribute BRINAVESS (vernakalant IV) to customers in the Swedish market. [More]
Study examines risks and benefits of testosterone therapy for older men

Study examines risks and benefits of testosterone therapy for older men

According to a statement issued today by the Endocrine Society, the risks and benefits of testosterone therapy for older men with declining levels of the hormone need to be fully evaluated. [More]

Cardiome Pharma files shelf prospectus and registration statement

Cardiome Pharma Corp. today announced that it has filed a preliminary short form base shelf prospectus with securities regulatory authorities in Canada, other than Qu├ębec, and a corresponding shelf registration statement with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") on Form F-10. [More]
Cerenis' Phase IIb CHI-SQUARE study fails to meet primary endpoint in post-ACS patients

Cerenis' Phase IIb CHI-SQUARE study fails to meet primary endpoint in post-ACS patients

Cerenis Therapeutics, the biopharmaceutical company, today announced that its Phase IIb CHI-SQUARE (Can HDL Infusions Significantly Quicken Atherosclerosis REgression?) study did not reach its primary endpoint in post-Acute Coronary Syndrome patients. [More]
HCV antiviral therapy also improves diabetes outcomes

HCV antiviral therapy also improves diabetes outcomes

Researchers from Taiwan reveal that antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus improves kidney and cardiovascular outcomes for patients with diabetes. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that incidences of kidney disease, stroke, and heart attack were lower in patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin compared to HCV patients not treated with antivirals or diabetic patients not infected with the virus. [More]
Sinai Hospital reports results from Phase 2a trial of apo A-I infusion therapy CSL112

Sinai Hospital reports results from Phase 2a trial of apo A-I infusion therapy CSL112

Researchers from the Sinai Center for Thrombosis Research presented findings from a Phase 2a trial substudy that examined the antiplatelet effects of CSL112, a novel apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) infusion therapy, at the American Heart Association 2013 Scientific Sessions. [More]
Study finds patients treated with varespladib drug more likely to experience cardiovascular events

Study finds patients treated with varespladib drug more likely to experience cardiovascular events

Patients with acute coronary syndrome who were treated with the experimental drug varespladib were more likely to experience additional cardiovascular events - including sudden death, heart attack and stroke - than those treated with placebo, according to research from the Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research (C5Research). [More]
Patients better adhere to medication regimens following hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome

Patients better adhere to medication regimens following hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome

Patients better adhered to their medication regimens in the year following hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome when they were part of a program that included personalized attention from a pharmacist compared with usual care, according to a study by P. Michael Ho, M.D., Ph.D., of the Denver VA Medical Center, and colleagues. [More]

Beta-blockers increase risk of adverse cardiac event during noncardiac surgical procedure

A recent study shows that patients given beta-blockers may actually be at increased risk of having an adverse cardiac event during a noncardiac surgical procedure. Risk of irregular heartbeat and worsening of symptoms in patients with existing heart disease also seemed to increase, but to a lesser degree. [More]
UCR, CRF initiate PROSPECT II trial to identify plaques that may lead to coronary events

UCR, CRF initiate PROSPECT II trial to identify plaques that may lead to coronary events

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) of New York, NY and the Uppsala Clinical Research Center (UCR) of Uppsala, Sweden announced today the initiation of the PROSPECT (Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree) II trial and the PROSPECT ABSORB sub study. [More]
Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs modestly reduce risk of acute coronary syndrome

Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs modestly reduce risk of acute coronary syndrome

Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor drugs (commonly called Anti-TNFs) modestly reduce the risk of acute coronary syndrome, such as heart attacks and angina, in rheumatoid arthritis patients whose inflammation places them at higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego. [More]

Patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis more likely to have heart problems

People with rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory conditions are at higher risk of heart disease. Who is in the most danger, why and how best to prevent and detect cardiovascular complications are important questions for physicians and researchers. [More]
Influenza vaccination linked with reduced risk of adverse cardiovascular events

Influenza vaccination linked with reduced risk of adverse cardiovascular events

Receiving an influenza vaccination was associated with a lower risk of major adverse cardiovascular events such as heart failure or hospitalization for heart attack, with the greatest treatment effect seen among patients with recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS; such as heart attack or unstable angina), according to a meta-analysis published in the October 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]

Study finds association between heart failure and air pollution

Air pollution increases heart attacks, according to research presented at the Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2013 by Dr Savina Nodari from Brescia, Italy. [More]