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Vertebroplasty helps decrease acute pain in patients with osteoporotic fractures

Vertebroplasty helps decrease acute pain in patients with osteoporotic fractures

Vertebroplasty is a safe and effective procedure to reduce acute pain and disability in patients who have experienced spinal fractures within a 6-week period, according to a new study published this week in The Lancet. [More]
Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Researchers from the University Health Network's Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences have determined that patients who have not had an opioid prescription within a year prior to their procedure are at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after major surgery. [More]
Discovery of pain paradox paves way to new methods of pain control

Discovery of pain paradox paves way to new methods of pain control

A natural substance known to activate pain in the central nervous system has been found to have the opposite effect in other parts of the body, potentially paving the way to new methods of pain control. [More]
OMT techniques can help decrease acute pain in postpartum women

OMT techniques can help decrease acute pain in postpartum women

Preliminary results demonstrate that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) helps reduce acute pain in postpartum women, regardless of whether they delivered vaginally or via cesarean. [More]
Opioid funding bill should address greater access to balanced pain management

Opioid funding bill should address greater access to balanced pain management

The Alliance for Balanced Pain Management (AfBPM) made the following statement on the Obama administration’s plan to curb the opioid addiction crisis, which was released this morning as Congress prepares to tackle funding for related programs. [More]

Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

There is merit in looking at the use of wearable biosensors to detect whether opioid users stay focused on their rehabilitation programs. [More]
Opioid use common among Medicare beneficiaries after hospital discharge

Opioid use common among Medicare beneficiaries after hospital discharge

Nearly 15 percent of opioid-naïve patients hospitalized under Medicare are discharged with a new prescription for opioids, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Study identifies persistent opioid use in some patients after knee or hip replacement

Study identifies persistent opioid use in some patients after knee or hip replacement

Many patients undergoing hip or knee replacement are still taking prescription opioid pain medications up to six months after surgery, reports a study in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]
Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain. A small, preliminary University of Florida Health study has suggested for the first time that inflammation may occur more quickly and at a higher magnitude -- and stays around longer -- when older adults experience pain versus when younger adults experience pain. [More]
Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, a group of Case Western University School of Medicine researchers presented their discovery of the full-length structure of a protein named Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 2 (TRPV2). [More]
ACB could lead to quicker, safer recovery after total knee arthroplasty

ACB could lead to quicker, safer recovery after total knee arthroplasty

Two commonly used nerve blocks during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are the adductor canal block (ACB) and femoral nerve block (FNB). ACB appears to preserve quadriceps strength superior to FNB while maintaining adequate postoperative pain control. Improving early functional outcome could lead to a quicker and safer recovery with earlier hospital discharges. [More]
Increased use of PNBs in hip and knee arthroplasty could improve medical outcomes

Increased use of PNBs in hip and knee arthroplasty could improve medical outcomes

The use of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) is associated with better medical and economic outcomes in patients receiving hip and knee replacement, according to research being presented at the 41st Annual Regional Anesthesiology and Acute Pain Medicine Meeting later this month. [More]
JINARC (tolvaptan) accepted for use in Scotland for ADPKD treatment

JINARC (tolvaptan) accepted for use in Scotland for ADPKD treatment

From today, people in Scotland with the genetic kidney disease ADPKD could benefit from JINARC® (tolvaptan) following advice issued by the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) for its use in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 1-3 at the start of treatment with evidence of rapidly progressing disease. [More]
EMA CHMP considers AcelRx's ARX-04 for acute pain treatment for centralized review

EMA CHMP considers AcelRx's ARX-04 for acute pain treatment for centralized review

AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapies for the intended treatment of acute pain, reported that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has confirmed that a Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) for ARX-04 may be submitted in the European Union (EU) under the Agency's centralized procedure. [More]
New technology may facilitate early detection of sickle cell disease for infants in developing countries

New technology may facilitate early detection of sickle cell disease for infants in developing countries

Researchers from Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented new research findings this weekend at the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology in Orlando. [More]
AfBPM's second National Summit aims to improve pain management, patient safety

AfBPM's second National Summit aims to improve pain management, patient safety

The Alliance for Balanced Pain Management, a diverse collective of 24 health care advocacy groups, patient organizations, industry representatives and other stakeholders, held its second National Summit on Nov. 12 and 13, 2015, to identify continued ways to support appropriate access to integrated pain management and responsible use of prescription pain medicines with an aim to improve patient safety and reduce abuse. [More]
Advanced pain management fellowship prepares CRNAs to meet needs of Americans with chronic pain

Advanced pain management fellowship prepares CRNAs to meet needs of Americans with chronic pain

As the first program of its kind in the United States, an advanced pain management fellowship prepares Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) with the pain management skills necessary to meet the needs of Americans with chronic pain, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. [More]
Nonmedical use of prescription opioids drops but overdose death rates rise in U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids drops but overdose death rates rise in U.S.

From 2003 to 2013, the percentage of nonmedical use of prescription opioids decreased among adults in the U.S., while the prevalence of prescription opioid use disorders, frequency of use, and related deaths increased, according to a study in the October 13 issue of JAMA. [More]
FDA awards research grants to boost product development for patients with rare diseases

FDA awards research grants to boost product development for patients with rare diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced it has awarded 18 new research grants totaling more than $19 million to boost the development of products for patients with rare diseases, which affect the lives of nearly 30 million Americans. [More]
AcelRx provides update on Zalviso (sufentanil sublingual tablet system)

AcelRx provides update on Zalviso (sufentanil sublingual tablet system)

AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapies for the treatment of acute pain, today provided a regulatory update on Zalviso (sufentanil sublingual tablet system) intended for the management of moderate-to-severe acute pain in adult patients in the hospital setting. [More]
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