Acute Myeloid Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Myeloid Leukemia News and Research

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a rapidly progressing cancer of the blood characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of immature blast cells in the bone marrow. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society estimates that over 13,000 new cases of AML were diagnosed and approximately 9,000 deaths from AML occurred in the U.S. during 2007. AML is generally a disease of older adults, and the median age of a patient diagnosed with AML is about 67 years. A majority of elderly patients are not considered candidates for standard induction therapy or decline therapy, resulting in an acute need for new treatment options.
Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients

Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients

New research shows that quickly identifying patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and speeding the process to find them a stem cell donor and performing the transplant earlier, can significantly improve their chances of surviving for at least two years after diagnosis without a relapse. [More]
New study finds smoking cessation at any age reduces risk of death

New study finds smoking cessation at any age reduces risk of death

Tobacco use continues to be a major cause of cancer and premature death. Most studies of cigarette smoking and mortality have focused on middle-aged populations, with fewer studies examining the impact of tobacco cessation on disease and mortality risk among the elderly. [More]
Cancer gene mutations can predict response to less intensive treatment in AML patients

Cancer gene mutations can predict response to less intensive treatment in AML patients

Patients with the most lethal form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - based on genetic profiles of their cancers - typically survive for only four to six months after diagnosis, even with aggressive chemotherapy. [More]
Implementation of large-scale genomic tumor profiling viable but faces several challenges

Implementation of large-scale genomic tumor profiling viable but faces several challenges

Researchers leading the largest genomic tumor profiling effort of its kind say such studies are technically feasible in a broad population of adult and pediatric patients with many different types of cancer, and that some patients can benefit by receiving precision drugs targeted to their tumors' mutations or being enrolled in clinical trials. [More]
ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

The American Society of Hematology has partnered with several organizations on independent educational programming designed to help address knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Scientists discover novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia

Scientists discover novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered a novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that normally requires prompt and aggressive treatment. [More]
Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center today announced the official opening of a first-of-its-kind clinic dedicated to providing innovative immunotherapies for cancer patients in clinical trials. [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
Blocking critical molecule with therapeutic antibody could effectively reduce leukemia burden

Blocking critical molecule with therapeutic antibody could effectively reduce leukemia burden

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer known for drug resistance and relapse. In an effort to uncover new treatment strategies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that a cell surface molecule known as CD98 promotes AML. [More]
Novel lipid-based therapeutic shows promise for combating drug resistance in AML

Novel lipid-based therapeutic shows promise for combating drug resistance in AML

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina Hollings Cancer Center have discovered a mechanism that confers resistance to drugs used to treat certain types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
New oncogene may contribute to high incidence of prostate cancer among African American men

New oncogene may contribute to high incidence of prostate cancer among African American men

A team of scientists has identified MNX1 as a new oncogene - a gene than can cause cancer - that is more active in African American prostate cancer than in European American prostate cancer. [More]
Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers receive $2.4 million grant from NIH NHLBI

Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers receive $2.4 million grant from NIH NHLBI

The National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute has awarded a $2.4 million grant over four years to Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers Jaroslaw Maciejewski, M.D., and Richard Padgett, Ph.D., to test the hypothesis that alterations in the pattern of splicing of target genes play a major role in the establishment or progression of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). [More]
Researchers awarded grant to develop safer cancer therapies for children

Researchers awarded grant to develop safer cancer therapies for children

Two Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers are receiving new funding from California-based St. Baldrick's Foundation for promising childhood cancer research. [More]
Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

An antibody drug that targets a surface marker on cancer stem cells could offer a promising new therapeutic approach for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of blood cancer that affects an estimated 50,000 people in Saudi Arabia. [More]
Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

Novel immunotherapy shows promise against AML in clinical trial

A new type of immunotherapy shows promise against cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that recur after treatment or that never respond to therapy in the first place. [More]
HMS scientists reveal how certain tumors develop taste for fat

HMS scientists reveal how certain tumors develop taste for fat

Cancers are such notorious sugar addicts that PET scans searching for the disease light up when they detect sugar-gobbling tumor cells. [More]
Researchers uncover new molecular causes of brain cancer and leukemia

Researchers uncover new molecular causes of brain cancer and leukemia

A joint research published today in Nature Communications has shown new molecular causes of brain cancer and leukemia. [More]
Adolescent females have low rates of pregnancy screening prior to cancer treatment

Adolescent females have low rates of pregnancy screening prior to cancer treatment

A new study indicates that adolescent females with acute leukemia have low rates of pregnancy screening prior to receiving chemotherapy that can cause birth defects. [More]
New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

Most people have never heard of mastocytosis. It's a rare, sometimes deadly, immune disorder. Now new research may help those with advanced mastocytosis and possibly many more people, too. [More]
Researchers find new way for early prediction of leukemic relapse

Researchers find new way for early prediction of leukemic relapse

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified RNA-based biomarkers that distinguish between normal, aging hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia stem cells associated with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), a particularly problematic disease that typically afflicts older patients who have often already experienced a bout with cancer. [More]
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