Acute Myeloid Leukemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Myeloid Leukemia News and Research

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a rapidly progressing cancer of the blood characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of immature blast cells in the bone marrow. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society estimates that over 13,000 new cases of AML were diagnosed and approximately 9,000 deaths from AML occurred in the U.S. during 2007. AML is generally a disease of older adults, and the median age of a patient diagnosed with AML is about 67 years. A majority of elderly patients are not considered candidates for standard induction therapy or decline therapy, resulting in an acute need for new treatment options.
Roswell Park study provides new insights into gene mutations that can lead to cancer

Roswell Park study provides new insights into gene mutations that can lead to cancer

​Predisposition to cancer and cancer progression can result from gene mutations that cause elevated rates of genetic damage. [More]
Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

Persistent infection in infant reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotic therapy

The quest to understand a prolonged infection in an infant being treated for leukemia has led to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovery of a mutation that allows bacteria to tolerate normally effective antibiotic therapy. The report appears today in the scientific journal mBio. [More]
Researchers identify possible treatment targets for myelodysplasia syndromes

Researchers identify possible treatment targets for myelodysplasia syndromes

Cincinnati Children's researchers report in Nature Immunology a new mechanism that controls blood cell function and several possible molecular targets for treating myelodysplasia syndromes (MDS) - a group of pre-malignant disorders in which bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. [More]
UC researchers uncover obesity-related protein's role in leukemia development

UC researchers uncover obesity-related protein's role in leukemia development

Cancer researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have found an obesity-associated protein's role in leukemia development and drug response which could lead to more effective therapies for the illness. [More]
FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. [More]
Newborns with CMV may have increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Newborns with CMV may have increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia

Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- a common virus in the herpes family -- may have an increased risk of developing acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), according to new research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. The study suggests the risk is even greater in Hispanic children. [More]
New technology that increases Natural Killer cells to stop cancers gets licensed

New technology that increases Natural Killer cells to stop cancers gets licensed

Our bodies contain Natural Killer (NK) cells - an army that stops cancers and viruses before they can make us sick. [More]
Personalized cancer vaccine improves outcomes for patients with AML, clinical study shows

Personalized cancer vaccine improves outcomes for patients with AML, clinical study shows

A personalized cancer vaccine markedly improved outcomes for patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a potentially lethal blood cancer, in a clinical trial led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. [More]
Stem cell-based risk scoring tool could predict AML patient’s response to standard treatment

Stem cell-based risk scoring tool could predict AML patient’s response to standard treatment

Leukemia researchers at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have developed a 17-gene signature derived from leukemia stem cells that can predict at diagnosis if patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will respond to standard treatment. [More]
New research reveals role of two genetic mutations in subset of acute myeloid leukemia

New research reveals role of two genetic mutations in subset of acute myeloid leukemia

Two genetic mutations known to play a role in many solid cancers might also help explain why a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients develop the disease, according to new research from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Experimental T-cell therapy shows promise in preventing AML relapse

Experimental T-cell therapy shows promise in preventing AML relapse

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center announced promising results from an early trial in which patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia received genetically engineered immune cells. [More]
Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients

Simple, coordinated approach can improve chances of survival for high-risk AML patients

New research shows that quickly identifying patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and speeding the process to find them a stem cell donor and performing the transplant earlier, can significantly improve their chances of surviving for at least two years after diagnosis without a relapse. [More]
New study finds smoking cessation at any age reduces risk of death

New study finds smoking cessation at any age reduces risk of death

Tobacco use continues to be a major cause of cancer and premature death. Most studies of cigarette smoking and mortality have focused on middle-aged populations, with fewer studies examining the impact of tobacco cessation on disease and mortality risk among the elderly. [More]
Cancer gene mutations can predict response to less intensive treatment in AML patients

Cancer gene mutations can predict response to less intensive treatment in AML patients

Patients with the most lethal form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - based on genetic profiles of their cancers - typically survive for only four to six months after diagnosis, even with aggressive chemotherapy. [More]
Implementation of large-scale genomic tumor profiling viable but faces several challenges

Implementation of large-scale genomic tumor profiling viable but faces several challenges

Researchers leading the largest genomic tumor profiling effort of its kind say such studies are technically feasible in a broad population of adult and pediatric patients with many different types of cancer, and that some patients can benefit by receiving precision drugs targeted to their tumors' mutations or being enrolled in clinical trials. [More]
ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

ASH partners with other organizations to address knowledge gaps in AML care

The American Society of Hematology has partnered with several organizations on independent educational programming designed to help address knowledge gaps in the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Scientists discover novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia

Scientists discover novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia

University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers discovered a novel therapeutic target and treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia, a cancer of the blood and bone marrow that normally requires prompt and aggressive treatment. [More]
Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center today announced the official opening of a first-of-its-kind clinic dedicated to providing innovative immunotherapies for cancer patients in clinical trials. [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
Blocking critical molecule with therapeutic antibody could effectively reduce leukemia burden

Blocking critical molecule with therapeutic antibody could effectively reduce leukemia burden

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer known for drug resistance and relapse. In an effort to uncover new treatment strategies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center discovered that a cell surface molecule known as CD98 promotes AML. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement