Acute Myeloid Leukaemia News and Research RSS Feed - Acute Myeloid Leukaemia News and Research

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a rapidly progressing cancer of the blood characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of immature blast cells in the bone marrow. The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society estimates that over 13,000 new cases of AML were diagnosed and approximately 9,000 deaths from AML occurred in the U.S. during 2007. AML is generally a disease of older adults, and the median age of a patient diagnosed with AML is about 67 years. A majority of elderly patients are not considered candidates for standard induction therapy or decline therapy, resulting in an acute need for new treatment options.
ATR inhibitors show improved survival and effectiveness in animal models of cancer

ATR inhibitors show improved survival and effectiveness in animal models of cancer

Tumours are an accumulation of cells that divide without control, accumulating hundreds of chromosomal alterations and mutations in their DNA. [More]
Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

Adolescents and young adults have lower cancer survival rates compared to children

More young people of all ages are surviving cancer than ever before, but new research published today in The Lancet Oncology journal shows that adolescents and young adults have a lower chance of surviving eight relatively common types of cancer than children, according to the latest data from a long-running study of cancer survival across Europe. [More]
Mitoxantrone for MS linked to colorectal cancer risk

Mitoxantrone for MS linked to colorectal cancer risk

Treatment with mitoxantrone for multiple sclerosis carries only a mildly increased risk of malignancy overall, but the risk of colorectal cancer and leukaemia is heightened, researchers have found. [More]
Researchers uncover new clue that may help fight AML

Researchers uncover new clue that may help fight AML

A study led by researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore has uncovered a new clue that may help fight acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the most common form of cancer of the blood and bone marrow, and an aggressive type of cancer. The findings open a new door to treating the disease more effectively. [More]
New combination treatment shows promise for treating acute myeloid leukaemia

New combination treatment shows promise for treating acute myeloid leukaemia

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered that the treatment of the most deadly form of blood cancer may be improved by combining two recently developed drugs. [More]
Discovery could lead to new leukaemia therapies

Discovery could lead to new leukaemia therapies

Human blood cells have olfactory receptors that respond to Sandalore. This could provide a starting point for new leukaemia therapies, as researchers from Bochum report in in the journal "Cell Death Discovery". [More]
Simple blood test could predict relapse in AML patients

Simple blood test could predict relapse in AML patients

A simple blood test capable of detecting trace levels of leukaemia cells remaining after intensive chemotherapy has been developed by scientists at the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London. [More]
Hhex protein could be key target for new therapies to cure leukaemia

Hhex protein could be key target for new therapies to cure leukaemia

Melbourne researchers have showed that they can stop leukaemia in its tracks by targeting a protein that puts the handbrake on cancer cell growth. [More]
Drugs that block KDM4C and PRMT1 genes could be effective in treating AML

Drugs that block KDM4C and PRMT1 genes could be effective in treating AML

Two genes have been identified that are critical to the development of the biggest leukaemia killer, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Researchers at King’s College London found that drugs that selectively block these genes could be highly effective in treating this type of leukaemia. [More]
Researchers identify genes that act as brakes to stop development of aggressive type of leukaemia

Researchers identify genes that act as brakes to stop development of aggressive type of leukaemia

Genes that act as brakes to stop the development of an aggressive form of leukaemia have been identified by researchers. [More]
How important is a mother’s diet before pregnancy? An interview with Dr Matt Silver

How important is a mother’s diet before pregnancy? An interview with Dr Matt Silver

In humans, much is already known about the impact of maternal undernutrition during pregnancy, and its impact on growth, development and disease throughout the life course. However, until recently little was known about the effects of the nutritional environment around the time of conception. [More]
Scientists create first 3-D image of key protein involved in development of cancers

Scientists create first 3-D image of key protein involved in development of cancers

Scientists from New Zealand and Australia have created the first three-dimensional image of a key protein involved in the development of blood and other cancers. [More]
Arsenic trioxide feasible in low-, high-risk acute promyelocytic leukaemia

Arsenic trioxide feasible in low-, high-risk acute promyelocytic leukaemia

The use of arsenic trioxide instead of idarubicin in combination with all-trans retinoic acid is a feasible option in patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia, regardless of risk level, suggests a phase III trial. [More]
BGB324 shows enhanced tumour clearance in mouse carcinoma models

BGB324 shows enhanced tumour clearance in mouse carcinoma models

BerGenBio AS, an oncology biopharmaceutical company, has announced new preclinical data on lead compound, BGB324, in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors, has been presented as a poster at CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR - The Inaugural International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, in New York. [More]
Scientists identify a gene that can cause more aggressive cancer in AML patients

Scientists identify a gene that can cause more aggressive cancer in AML patients

University of Manchester scientists have identified a gene - FOXC1 - that, if switched on, causes more aggressive cancer in a fifth of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients, according to a Cancer Research UK study published in the journal Cancer Cell, today (Monday). [More]

Hedgehog blockade promising in myeloid malignancies

Phase I trial results published in The Lancet Haematology show that the hedgehog signalling pathway antagonist PF-04449913 is tolerable and has activity in patients with haematological cancers. [More]
Researchers identify gene variant that makes breast cancer cells more aggressive

Researchers identify gene variant that makes breast cancer cells more aggressive

A particular human gene variant makes breast cancer cells more aggressive. Not only are these more resistant to chemotherapy but also leave the primary tumour and establish themselves in other parts of the body in the form of metastases. An international group of researchers led by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna has now identified a gene, AF1q, as being substantially responsible for this and recognized it as a possible starting point for more accurate diagnosis and potential targeted therapeutic approaches. [More]
BerGenBio begins BGB324 Phase 1b trial in combination with erlotinib in NSCLC patients

BerGenBio begins BGB324 Phase 1b trial in combination with erlotinib in NSCLC patients

BerGenBio AS, an oncology biopharmaceutical company, today announces that its multi-centre open label Phase 1b trial (BGBC004) of BGB324, a selective inhibitor of Axl, in patients with Stage IIIb and Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in erlotinib-sensitive and refractory patients who have an activating EGFR mutation, is now underway at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Oncology Partners, Houston, and at UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA. [More]
Inhibitors BGB324 and BGB10C9 show promise in multiple murine models of pancreatic cancer

Inhibitors BGB324 and BGB10C9 show promise in multiple murine models of pancreatic cancer

BerGenBio AS, an oncology biopharmaceutical company, today announces that an abstract on the latest data on BGB324, the Company's first-in-class, selective small molecule inhibitor of the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase, and BGB10C9, an Axl function-blocking monoclonal antibody in pre-clinical development at BerGenBio, has been published in conjunction with the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago, May 29 - June 2, 2015. [More]
Combination of contraceptive and cholesterol-lowering drugs kills cancer cells in a new way

Combination of contraceptive and cholesterol-lowering drugs kills cancer cells in a new way

The combination of a cholesterol-lowering drug, Bezafibrate, and a contraceptive steroid, Medroxyprogesterone Acetate, could be an effective, non-toxic treatment for a range of cancers, researchers at the University of Birmingham have found. [More]
Advertisement