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Implanting tubes in ears is less likely to improve long-term cognitive and functional development

Implanting tubes in ears is less likely to improve long-term cognitive and functional development

Watchful waiting or ear tube surgery? It is a decision faced by millions of families of children with recurrent or chronic otitis media with effusion (non-infected fluid in the middle ear) each year. [More]
U.S. FDA warns of post-surgery codeine deaths in children

U.S. FDA warns of post-surgery codeine deaths in children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued a Drug Safety Communication concerning three children who died and one child who experienced a non-fatal but life-threatening case of respiratory depression after taking the pain reliever codeine following surgery to remove tonsils (tonsillectomy) and/or adenoids (adenoidectomy). [More]
Children with SDB may have better QOL after adenotonsillectomy

Children with SDB may have better QOL after adenotonsillectomy

Children may have a better quality of life (QOL) and diminished cardiovascular disease risk from the decreased endothelin 1 (ET-1) levels after adenotonsillectomy, according to new research published in the December 2011 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
PACBIS tool may help identify pre-surgical behaviors in parents, children

PACBIS tool may help identify pre-surgical behaviors in parents, children

A clinical study presented at ANESTHESIOLOGY 2011 highlighted a behavioral assessment tool that may help anesthesia providers identify pre-surgical behaviors in parents and children that lead to maladaptive behaviors in children after surgery. [More]
Majority of tonsil surgery in children performed during summer vacation

Majority of tonsil surgery in children performed during summer vacation

Scheduling tonsils to be removed figures into many parents' itineraries for their childrens' summer vacation, right up there with summer camp stays and family reunions. An estimated 500,000 children have the procedure each year. [More]
Guidelines for pediatric use of polysomnography for sleep-disordered breathing before tonsillectomy

Guidelines for pediatric use of polysomnography for sleep-disordered breathing before tonsillectomy

A multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline, "Polysomnography for Sleep-Disordered Breathing Prior to Tonsillectomy in Children" will be published as a supplement to the July issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Tonsillectomy linked to obesity later in life: Study

Tonsillectomy linked to obesity later in life: Study

The study involved 795 children from 0 to 18 years who were described as normal to overweight prior to their operations, and they were separated into three separate groups. Group 1 included three studies involving 127 children, whose body mass index (BMI) increased by 5.5 per cent to 8.2 per cent. [More]
Tonsillectomy increases risk of pediatric obesity

Tonsillectomy increases risk of pediatric obesity

Tonsillectomy is the most common major surgical procedure performed in children. Children who undergo the surgical removal of their tonsils (tonsillectomy), with or without the removal of their adenoids (adenoidectomy), are at increased risk for becoming overweight after surgery, according to new research published in the February 2011 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
New guideline provides evidence-based recommendation for children undergoing tonsillectomy

New guideline provides evidence-based recommendation for children undergoing tonsillectomy

A multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline, "Tonsillectomy in Children" will be published in the January issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. [More]

New research shows microdebrider technique has lowest overall complication rate

In a review of three different surgical techniques commonly used for tonsillectomy, the microdebrider technique (where a rotary cutting tool is used to shave tissue) had the lowest overall complication rate when compared to the other two techniques. The results are shown in new research published in the June 2010 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Adequate primary care is associated with fewer ear and throat surgeries among children

Adequate primary care is associated with fewer ear and throat surgeries among children

The availability of surgeons may increase the likelihood that children will receive optional ear and throat surgeries, while the availability of primary care providers, such as pediatricians and family physicians, may decrease the likelihood of children undergoing these procedures, according to research to be presented Saturday, May 1 at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. [More]
Balloon Sinuplasty minimally invasive surgery safe for treating chronic sinusitis in children

Balloon Sinuplasty minimally invasive surgery safe for treating chronic sinusitis in children

A recently published study in the American Journal of Rhinology and Allergy demonstrates Balloon Sinuplasty™ technology to be safe when used by physicians in pediatric patients. Known as the INTACT study, this is a prospective, non-randomized, multicenter study and was sponsored by Acclarent, Inc. [More]
Study indicates pain treatment may vary in Latino and white children post surgery

Study indicates pain treatment may vary in Latino and white children post surgery

Differences might exist in the amount of pain medicine given to Latino and white children after surgery, found a new, small study in which Latino children received 30 percent less opioid analgesics (morphine or morphine-like drugs) than white children did. [More]
Hospital based surgical center out performed by ambulatory surgical center in otolaryngic surgeries

Hospital based surgical center out performed by ambulatory surgical center in otolaryngic surgeries

Measuring five quality-base performance areas, an ambulatory surgical center out performed a standard hospital based surgical center in otolaryngic surgeries, according to new research in the December 2009 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Surgery may not be the best option for children with obstructive sleep apnea

Surgery may not be the best option for children with obstructive sleep apnea

For children with obstructive sleep apnea, standard care often includes a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. But researchers at Saint Louis University say further research is needed to determine if surgery is the best option for these patients. [More]
Medtronic receives global distribution rights for PEAK Surgical’s tissue dissection device

Medtronic receives global distribution rights for PEAK Surgical’s tissue dissection device

PEAK Surgical, Inc. and Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT) today announced an agreement that grants the Surgical Technologies business at Medtronic exclusive rights for global distribution and marketing of the PEAK PlasmaBlade® TnA (Tonsil and Adenoid) tissue dissection device for the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) market. [More]
Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy surgery improves quality of life for children with sleep apnea

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy surgery improves quality of life for children with sleep apnea

For children who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can provide dramatic relief and is successful in solving sleep problems for 80 to 90 percent of children, a Saint Louis University study found. [More]
Intracapsular tonsil removal associated with reduced postoperative pain, bleeding

Intracapsular tonsil removal associated with reduced postoperative pain, bleeding

Patients who have a tonsillectomy using an “intracapsular” technique - which removes at least 90 percent of tonsil tissue, but spares the tonsil capsule - appear to have less postoperative heavy bleeding and pain compared with those who undergo traditional tonsil removal surgery, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery [More]
No intervention is necessary for most children with fluid in their ears

No intervention is necessary for most children with fluid in their ears

A Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh study finds that prompt insertion of tympanostomy tubes (small ear tubes) does not improve developmental outcomes of children at 6 years of age as once thought. [More]
Tonsil swabbing is terrible - it makes people gag

Tonsil swabbing is terrible - it makes people gag

Mayo Clinic ear, nose and throat surgeons hoped to find a more user-friendly test for strep throat than swabbing the tonsils directly, but instead discovered that the swab has to touch the tonsils to accurately detect the infection. [More]