Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency News and Research RSS Feed - Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency News and Research

Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an inherited disorder that damages the immune system and causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Children with SCID lack virtually all immune protection from bacteria, viruses, and fungi. They are prone to repeated and persistent infections that can be very serious or life-threatening. These infections are often caused by "opportunistic" organisms that ordinarily do not cause illness in people with a normal immune system. Infants with SCID typically experience pneumonia, chronic diarrhea, and widespread skin rashes, and grow much more slowly than healthy children. Some also have neurological problems such as developmental delay, movement disorders, and hearing loss. If not treated in a way that restores immune function, children with SCID usually live only a year or two.
Orphan, St George's sign licensing agreement to develop new therapies for metabolic disorders

Orphan, St George's sign licensing agreement to develop new therapies for metabolic disorders

St George's, University of London has signed an exclusive worldwide licensing agreement with rare-disease research-and-development firm Orphan Technologies Ltd to develop new therapies for deadly metabolic disorders. [More]
Gene therapy can effectively treat ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency

Gene therapy can effectively treat ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency

Severe combined immunodeficiency is defect in the immune system that results in a loss of the adaptive immune cells known as B cells and T cells. Mutations in several different genes can lead to the development of severe combined immunodeficiency, including mutation of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene. Traditional treatment options, such as enzyme replacement therapy, are of limited efficacy, but bone marrow transplant from a compatible donor leads to a better response. [More]
Global gene therapy market to reach $300 million by 2015

Global gene therapy market to reach $300 million by 2015

The global gene therapy market is expected to grow to over $300 million by 2015, according to a new report available on companiesandmarkets.com. The gene therapy market will grow further driven by the human genome project, the increasing incidence of cancer and other critical diseases. [More]
Children's Hospital pediatric immunologist collaborates with European gene therapy researchers to study WAS syndrome

Children's Hospital pediatric immunologist collaborates with European gene therapy researchers to study WAS syndrome

A pediatric immunologist at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia collaborated with European gene therapy researchers who achieved marked clinical improvements in two young children with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a very rare but often severe immunodeficiency disorder. [More]
Adult human stem cells shown not to pose a cancer risk when implanted into different organs

Adult human stem cells shown not to pose a cancer risk when implanted into different organs

A new study by UC Davis researchers provides evidence that methods using human bone marrow-derived stem cells to deliver gene therapy to cure diseases of the blood, bone marrow and certain types of cancer do not cause the development of tumors or leukemia. [More]