Adenotonsillectomy News and Research RSS Feed - Adenotonsillectomy News and Research

Adenotonsillectomy is an operation to remove both the adenoids and tonsils.
Study: Tonsil removal for children with sleep apnea decreases asthma severity

Study: Tonsil removal for children with sleep apnea decreases asthma severity

Surgical removal of the tonsils and adenoids in children suffering from sleep apnea is associated with decreased asthma severity, according to the first large study of the connection, published in the journal PLOS Medicine. [More]
Early adenotonsillectomy can improve behavior and sleep apnea symptoms in children

Early adenotonsillectomy can improve behavior and sleep apnea symptoms in children

Adenotonsillectomy, or the removal of the adenoids and tonsils, is performed 500,000 times a year in the United States, often as a treatment for children with obstructive sleep apnea. [More]
Approximately 10% of 6-8 year olds have sleep-disordered breathing: Study

Approximately 10% of 6-8 year olds have sleep-disordered breathing: Study

Approximately ten per cent of 6-8 year olds have sleep-disordered breathing, according to a recent Finnish study. The risk is increased among children with enlarged tonsils, crossbite and convex facial profile. [More]
Prader-Willi children may receive relief from sleep disorders after adenotonsillectomy

Prader-Willi children may receive relief from sleep disorders after adenotonsillectomy

Children with Prader-Willi syndrome may receive relief from sleep disorders after undergoing an adenotonsillectomy, suggests a new study from Nationwide Children's Hospital published in the November print issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Dexamethasone use during tonsillectomy not associated with excessive bleeding in children

Dexamethasone use during tonsillectomy not associated with excessive bleeding in children

Tonsillectomy is exceedingly common, with a reported increase in tonsillectomy rates in children younger than 15 years from 287,000 to 530,000 per year over the past decade. Although safe, adenotonsillectomy can result in significant complications, such as aspiration and bleeding. Complications are infrequent, but because tonsillectomy is so common, the absolute number of children experiencing tonsillectomy complications is formidable. [More]
AAP urges snoring screening for all children

AAP urges snoring screening for all children

All children and adolescents should be screened for snoring as part of routine health-maintenance visits and polysomnography considered for those with co-occurring symptoms such as daytime sleepiness, according to guidelines from the AAP. [More]
Treatment of OSA in children can reverse neuronal brain injury

Treatment of OSA in children can reverse neuronal brain injury

Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children normalizes disturbances in the neuronal network responsible for attention and executive function, according to a new study. [More]
Children with SDB may have better QOL after adenotonsillectomy

Children with SDB may have better QOL after adenotonsillectomy

Children may have a better quality of life (QOL) and diminished cardiovascular disease risk from the decreased endothelin 1 (ET-1) levels after adenotonsillectomy, according to new research published in the December 2011 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
AAO-HNSF's 2011 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO to convene in San Francisco

AAO-HNSF's 2011 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO to convene in San Francisco

The 2011 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO of the American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF), the largest meeting of ear, nose, and throat doctors in the world, will convene September 11-14, 2011, in San Francisco, CA. [More]
Adenotonsillectomy prevents high blood pressure and heart damage in children with OSA

Adenotonsillectomy prevents high blood pressure and heart damage in children with OSA

Removing enlarged tonsils and adenoids may help prevent high blood pressure and heart damage in children who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, according to a study conducted at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. [More]
Tonsillectomy increases risk of pediatric obesity

Tonsillectomy increases risk of pediatric obesity

Tonsillectomy is the most common major surgical procedure performed in children. Children who undergo the surgical removal of their tonsils (tonsillectomy), with or without the removal of their adenoids (adenoidectomy), are at increased risk for becoming overweight after surgery, according to new research published in the February 2011 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Polysomnography may predict adverse outcomes following pediatric adenotonsillectomy: Study

Polysomnography may predict adverse outcomes following pediatric adenotonsillectomy: Study

Performing polysomnography prior to pediatric adenotonsillectomy may help identify children at a higher risk of developing postoperative respiratory complications, according to a report in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology - Head Neck Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. [More]
Children and teens with moderate to severe OSA have lower academic grades: Research

Children and teens with moderate to severe OSA have lower academic grades: Research

The average academic grades of children and teens with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea are worse than the grades of students who have no sleep-disordered breathing, according to a research abstract that will be presented Tuesday, June 8, 2010, in San Antonio, Texas, at SLEEP 2010, the 24th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC. [More]

New research shows microdebrider technique has lowest overall complication rate

In a review of three different surgical techniques commonly used for tonsillectomy, the microdebrider technique (where a rotary cutting tool is used to shave tissue) had the lowest overall complication rate when compared to the other two techniques. The results are shown in new research published in the June 2010 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Hospital based surgical center out performed by ambulatory surgical center in otolaryngic surgeries

Hospital based surgical center out performed by ambulatory surgical center in otolaryngic surgeries

Measuring five quality-base performance areas, an ambulatory surgical center out performed a standard hospital based surgical center in otolaryngic surgeries, according to new research in the December 2009 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Surgery may not be the best option for children with obstructive sleep apnea

Surgery may not be the best option for children with obstructive sleep apnea

For children with obstructive sleep apnea, standard care often includes a tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. But researchers at Saint Louis University say further research is needed to determine if surgery is the best option for these patients. [More]
Sibling risk of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and adenotonsillar hypertrophy

Sibling risk of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and adenotonsillar hypertrophy

A study in the Aug. 1 issue of the journal SLEEP indicates that children have an increased risk of developing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) if they have at least one sibling who has been diagnosed with the sleep disorder. [More]
Sleep disordered breathing in children in a general population sample: prevalence and risk factors

Sleep disordered breathing in children in a general population sample: prevalence and risk factors

A study in the June 1 issue of the journal SLEEP found that waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) are consistent, independent risk factors for all severity levels of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children, suggesting that as with adult SDB, metabolic factors are important risk factors for childhood SDB. [More]
Surgery effective in treating pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

Surgery effective in treating pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

Infants and young toddlers with obstructive sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing experience significant improvement following surgical treatment of the ailment, according to an invited article in the June 2009 issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. [More]
Obstructive sleep apnea starts from the first year of life

Obstructive sleep apnea starts from the first year of life

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in very young children may cause some of the adverse cardiovascular health consequences seen in older children and adults with the condition, according to researchers in Israel, who will present their findings at the American Thoracic Society's 2008 International Conference in Toronto on Wednesday, May 21. [More]