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Study links broken heart syndrome to natural disasters

Study links broken heart syndrome to natural disasters

Dramatic spikes in cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also called broken heart syndrome, were found in two states after major natural disasters, suggesting the stress of disasters as a likely trigger, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Anaphylaxis Campaign, Boots UK partner to support patients with severe allergy

In 2013 a unique new online course was created for Boots UK pharmacists to improve their customer care of patients who have a severe allergy. The training builds on the pharmacists existing knowledge of severe allergies to ensure they have a solid clinical understanding of the condition and the emergency treatment options for a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). [More]

Anaphylaxis Campaign provides updated information on Idiopathic anaphylaxis

Most people have heard of severe allergies, or anaphylaxis, to food, insect stings, drugs and other common substances, but sometimes no cause at all can be found for a person’s reaction – a condition called Idiopathic anaphylaxis. [More]
Falling in love causes body to release feel-good chemicals that trigger specific physical reactions

Falling in love causes body to release feel-good chemicals that trigger specific physical reactions

Getting struck by Cupid's arrow may very well take your breath away and make your heart go pitter-patter this Valentine's Day, reports sexual wellness specialists at Loyola University Health System. [More]
Children with peanut allergies could benefit from oral immunotherapy treatment

Children with peanut allergies could benefit from oral immunotherapy treatment

Children and adolescents with peanut allergies could benefit from treatment with oral immunotherapy (OIT), in which peanut protein is consumed in increasingly larger amounts on a regular basis to build up tolerance, according to a phase 2 trial published in The Lancet. [More]
Study raises hopes for new drugs to treat brain disorders associated with neurotransmitter imbalance

Study raises hopes for new drugs to treat brain disorders associated with neurotransmitter imbalance

Although drugs have been developed that inhibit the imbalance of neurotransmitters in the brain - a condition which causes many brain disorders and nervous system diseases - the exact understanding of the mechanism by which these drugs work has not yet been fully understood. [More]
Researchers reveal how metabolic system breaks down in obesity

Researchers reveal how metabolic system breaks down in obesity

Researchers at University of Michigan have illuminated an aspect of how the metabolic system breaks down in obesity. The findings provide additional evidence that a drug entering clinical trials at the university could reverse obesity, Type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease in humans. [More]
Severe allergies in young people: an interview with Lynne Regent, CEO of Anaphylaxis Campaign

Severe allergies in young people: an interview with Lynne Regent, CEO of Anaphylaxis Campaign

Around one third of the UK population – approximately 19 million people – will develop an allergy at some time in their lives. A significant proportion of these – around a million people – suffer severe symptoms. [More]
Ghrelin hormone released during chronic stress may predispose people to PTSD

Ghrelin hormone released during chronic stress may predispose people to PTSD

​About a dozen years ago, scientists discovered that a hormone called ghrelin enhances appetite. Dubbed the "hunger hormone," ghrelin was quickly targeted by drug companies seeking treatments for obesity - none of which have yet panned out. [More]
TSRI scientists discover viable strategy for weight loss in people

TSRI scientists discover viable strategy for weight loss in people

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered key details of a brain-to-body signaling circuit that enables roundworms to lose weight independently of food intake. The weight-loss circuit is activated by combined signals from the worm versions of the neurotransmitters serotonin and adrenaline, and there are reasons to suspect that it exists in a similar form in humans and other mammals. [More]
New class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating deadly form of lung cancer

New class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating deadly form of lung cancer

A little-used class of antidepressants appears potentially effective in combating a particularly deadly form of lung cancer, according to a new study from researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]

University student shares experiences about managing severe allergy

Ahead of the first term back for university undergraduates this month, the Anaphylaxis Campaign has released a short film on their YouTube channel. [More]

Researchers show that JQ1 drug can block molecular pathway responsible for heart failure

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have made a fundamental discovery relevant to the understanding and treatment of heart failure - a leading cause of death worldwide. The team discovered a new molecular pathway responsible for causing heart failure and showed that a first-in-class prototype drug, JQ1, blocks this pathway to protect the heart from damage. [More]

Combination therapy during cardiac arrest results in improved hospital discharge and neurological status

Among patients who experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest requiring vasopressors (drugs that increase blood pressure), use of a combination therapy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation resulted in improved survival to hospital discharge with favorable neurological status, according to a study in the July 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
Nerves play critical role in development and spread of prostate tumors, say researchers

Nerves play critical role in development and spread of prostate tumors, say researchers

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that nerves play a critical role in both the development and spread of prostate tumors. Their findings, using both a mouse model and human prostate tissue, may lead to new ways to predict the aggressiveness of prostate cancer and to novel therapies for preventing and treating the disease. The study published online today in the July 12 edition of Science. [More]
Sleep related breathing disorders associated with cognitive and behavioral impairment in children

Sleep related breathing disorders associated with cognitive and behavioral impairment in children

People lobbying for gun control may want to consider another culprit in the post-Newtown search for the answer to our unfathomable questions. [More]
Loyola offers tips to avoid sledding injuries in kids

Loyola offers tips to avoid sledding injuries in kids

A hearty snowfall brings anticipation for one of winter's highlights - sledding. The adrenaline from speeding down an icy hill, feeling the snow spraying your face and the wind's icy fingers nearly taking your breath away can be exhilarating. There is nothing like tearing down a perfect sledding hill to get rid of cabin fever. However, serious injuries can accompany the winter fun if precautions are not taken. [More]

Wake Forest expands football helmet research to reduce sports concussion risks

Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences is expanding its ground-breaking research of testing football helmets to reduce the number of concussions to now include hockey, baseball, softball, and lacrosse. [More]

Emotional stress can reduce prostate cancer drugs’ effectiveness

Not surprisingly, a cancer diagnosis creates stress. And patients with prostate cancer show higher levels of anxiety compared to other cancer patients. A new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center indicates that stress is not just an emotional side effect of the diagnosis; it also can reduce the effectiveness of prostate cancer drugs and accelerate the development of prostate cancer. [More]

Sanofi Canada announces new option for emergency treatment of anaphylaxis

Sanofi Canada announces a new option for the emergency treatment of anaphylaxis. Allerject is the first and only 'talking' epinephrine auto-injector in Canada. [More]