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Plans for schools to hold spare adrenaline auto-injector continue to progress positively

Plans for schools to hold spare adrenaline auto-injector continue to progress positively

The plans for an amendment to legislation which will allow all state schools to hold a spare adrenaline injector for use in case of emergencies continues to progress positively. We have been informed today by the Department of Health that this change is to come into effect in October of this year. [More]
Strong emotional reactions can trigger adrenaline release that causes goose bumps

Strong emotional reactions can trigger adrenaline release that causes goose bumps

When you find yourself in an eerie place or the beat drops just right during a favorite song, the chills start multiplying. You know the feeling. It is a shiver that seems to come from within and makes your hairs stand on end. [More]
Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Delay in giving adrenaline shots after cardiac arrest lowers survival rates of patients

Hospitals in which the administration of epinephrine to patients whose hearts have stopped is delayed beyond five minutes have significantly lower survival rates of those patients, a new study led by a cardiologist at UT Southwestern Medical Center finds. [More]
Pharmacotherapy combined with rehabilitation program offers hope for traumatic brain injury patients

Pharmacotherapy combined with rehabilitation program offers hope for traumatic brain injury patients

Pharmacological therapy combined with a rehabilitation program that teaches how to compensate for memory and attention problems offers new hope for people who suffer the consequences of traumatic brain injury. [More]
Study explores biological marker to predict individual response to drug treatment for combat PTSD

Study explores biological marker to predict individual response to drug treatment for combat PTSD

Treatment with the drug prazosin effectively reduces symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for many people, but about one third of patients don't respond to the treatment at all. [More]
Research reveals new insights into happy hormone, dopamine

Research reveals new insights into happy hormone, dopamine

Dopamine is a so-called messenger substance or neurotransmitter that conveys signals between neurons. [More]
New research examines p-synephrine's role in burning fat during rest and exercise

New research examines p-synephrine's role in burning fat during rest and exercise

When we exercise, our body's oxidation of fat and carbohydrates depends on the intensity and duration of the activity. [More]
The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

In healthcare, we have physicians, nurses and paramedics who know the textbook by heart and know exactly what they need to do, but have never experienced the procedure first-hand, or they have no experience responding to adverse events that may occur. [More]
Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Stress is actually a bit of a buzzword. The initial definition was “the reaction to changes”, which is why you get stressed also when good things happen, hence the distinction between good stress, eustress, and bad stress, distress. [More]
Scientists identify lipodystrophy-causing mutation in a single family

Scientists identify lipodystrophy-causing mutation in a single family

Lipodystrophy syndromes are characterized by an abnormal distribution of adipose tissue and metabolic dysfunction. These disorders are rare and the underlying genetic abnormalities that lead to altered fat distribution are not fully known. [More]
Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

Inhibiting adrenaline receptors reduces breast cancer brain metastases

While we look to invent new medicines to treat cancer, a parallel approach to repurpose existing medicines may be highly effective. Stress, mediated by adrenaline, has been suspected to promote cancer growth and this research study shows that by blocking adrenaline receptors in breast cancers, they are less successful in spreading to and growing in the brain. [More]
Mouse-based study shows exercise decreases cancer incidence, slows tumor growth

Mouse-based study shows exercise decreases cancer incidence, slows tumor growth

When you're pounding along an icy pavement or sweating through a gym workout, you try to remind yourself of the many health benefits of exercise. Between gasps, you can say that a healthy, fit lifestyle helps prevents obesity, a worldwide problem of increasing magnitude that has been linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. [More]
Sleeping too much or too little increases risk of dying from heart disease

Sleeping too much or too little increases risk of dying from heart disease

Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk.Sleeping less than four hours or more than eight hours a night increases the risk of dying from some types of coronary heart disease, such as heart attacks and unstable angina pectoris, according to a study by Norwegian and Taiwanese researchers. [More]
Beta blockers may improve effectiveness of triple negative breast cancer treatments

Beta blockers may improve effectiveness of triple negative breast cancer treatments

New research published in the March 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that a commonly prescribed class of high blood pressure drugs may have the potential to slow the growth of triple negative breast cancer tumors. These drugs, called "beta blockers" work by counteracting the pro-growth effect caused by adrenaline by affecting the the beta2-adrenoceptor. [More]
Simple physics may play key role in helping the body to fight infection

Simple physics may play key role in helping the body to fight infection

Simple physics may play a larger role than previously thought in helping control key bodily processes - such as how the body fights infection. [More]
Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Johns Hopkins has demonstrated in animals that applying a pacemaker's mild electrical shocks to push the heart in and out of normal synchronized contraction for part of each day may be an effective way to slow down the progression of heart failure, a disorder that afflicts millions of Americans. [More]
Brain regions cause PTSD patients to generalize non-threatening events

Brain regions cause PTSD patients to generalize non-threatening events

Regions of the brain function differently among people with post-traumatic stress disorder, causing them to generalize non-threatening events as if they were the original trauma, according to new research from Duke Medicine and the Durham VA Medical Center. [More]
Larger crystals of bacteriorhodopsin protein grow by consuming smaller crystals around them

Larger crystals of bacteriorhodopsin protein grow by consuming smaller crystals around them

A group of biophysicists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their international colleagues have studied the crystallization of molecules of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. The scientists have demonstrated that the larger crystals of the protein grow by "consuming" smaller crystals around them and creating "depletion zone" around themselves. [More]
A unique perspective on health and exercise

A unique perspective on health and exercise

For over 30 years, Terrie Williams has been studying exercise physiology in wild animals: African lions and wild dogs, dolphins and whales, coyotes and mountain lions, as well as a few human athletes. [More]
Epinephrine delay decreases survival for children with in-hospital, nonshockable cardiac arrest

Epinephrine delay decreases survival for children with in-hospital, nonshockable cardiac arrest

Among children with in-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial nonshockable heart rhythm who received epinephrine (adrenaline), delay in administration of epinephrine was associated with a decreased chance of 24-hour survival and survival to hospital discharge, according to a study in the August 25 issue of JAMA. [More]
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