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Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Johns Hopkins has demonstrated in animals that applying a pacemaker's mild electrical shocks to push the heart in and out of normal synchronized contraction for part of each day may be an effective way to slow down the progression of heart failure, a disorder that afflicts millions of Americans. [More]
Brain regions cause PTSD patients to generalize non-threatening events

Brain regions cause PTSD patients to generalize non-threatening events

Regions of the brain function differently among people with post-traumatic stress disorder, causing them to generalize non-threatening events as if they were the original trauma, according to new research from Duke Medicine and the Durham VA Medical Center. [More]
Larger crystals of bacteriorhodopsin protein grow by consuming smaller crystals around them

Larger crystals of bacteriorhodopsin protein grow by consuming smaller crystals around them

A group of biophysicists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their international colleagues have studied the crystallization of molecules of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. The scientists have demonstrated that the larger crystals of the protein grow by "consuming" smaller crystals around them and creating "depletion zone" around themselves. [More]
A unique perspective on health and exercise

A unique perspective on health and exercise

For over 30 years, Terrie Williams has been studying exercise physiology in wild animals: African lions and wild dogs, dolphins and whales, coyotes and mountain lions, as well as a few human athletes. [More]
Epinephrine delay decreases survival for children with in-hospital, nonshockable cardiac arrest

Epinephrine delay decreases survival for children with in-hospital, nonshockable cardiac arrest

Among children with in-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial nonshockable heart rhythm who received epinephrine (adrenaline), delay in administration of epinephrine was associated with a decreased chance of 24-hour survival and survival to hospital discharge, according to a study in the August 25 issue of JAMA. [More]
Adolescent e-cigarette users more likely to start smoking

Adolescent e-cigarette users more likely to start smoking

As e-cigarette usage among high school students continues to climb, a recent study from The Journal of the American Medical Association reveals an unsettling trend: that adolescent e-cigarette users are more likely than their non-vaping peers to initiate use of combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes, cigars and hookahs. The reason may lie in a common denominator between e-cigarettes and their combustible counterparts: nicotine. [More]
U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

U-M microbiome research may lead to new ways to prevent, fight lung infections in patients

With every breath you take, microbes have a chance of making it into your lungs. But what happens when they get there? And why do dangerous lung infections like pneumonia happen in some people, but not others? Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have started to answer these questions by studying the microbiome of the lungs - the community of microscopic organisms that are in constant contact with our respiratory system. [More]
Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the European Commission (EC) has granted Marketing Authorisation for Unituxin (dinutuximab) for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients aged 12 months to 17 years, who have previously received induction chemotherapy and achieved at least a partial response, followed by myeloablative therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). [More]
Research reveals how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms during exercise

Research reveals how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms during exercise

University of Manchester research presented today at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference has revealed how a faulty gene can cause fatal abnormal heart rhythms that are brought on by exercise. [More]
Important tips to prevent food allergies

Important tips to prevent food allergies

Food allergies affect over 1.4 million Canadians, and this number is increasing. Allergic reactions to a food can happen quickly and without warning. [More]
Study: Mutated ATRX gene may serve as much-needed biomarker for rare neuroendocrine tumors

Study: Mutated ATRX gene may serve as much-needed biomarker for rare neuroendocrine tumors

A somatic mutation in the ATRX gene has recently been shown as a potential molecular marker for aggressive brain tumors, such as gliomas, neuroblastomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Now, for the first time, researchers at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center have found that the same mutated gene may serve as a much-needed biomarker for the pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) that become malignant. [More]
Edison announces initiation of full coverage on ADRs of DBV Technologies

Edison announces initiation of full coverage on ADRs of DBV Technologies

Edison Investment Research, a leading international investment research firm, announces the initiation of full coverage on the US-listed ADRs of DBV Technologies, the French allergy company focused on peanut allergy. [More]
Study suggests that beta blockers may benefit patients suffering from HFPEF

Study suggests that beta blockers may benefit patients suffering from HFPEF

A novel registry study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden suggests that beta blockers may benefit also patients suffering from a relatively unknown form of heart failure called HFPEF, which today lacks well-established treatment. [More]
Stimulating nerves in ear could improve heart health

Stimulating nerves in ear could improve heart health

Stimulating nerves in your ear could improve the health of your heart, researchers have discovered. A team at the University of Leeds used a standard TENS machine like those designed to relieve labour pains to apply electrical pulses to the tragus, the small raised flap at the front of the ear immediately in front of the ear canal. [More]
Urge incontinence therapy may relieve stress incontinence

Urge incontinence therapy may relieve stress incontinence

Anticholinergic medication appears to be effective as a treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence, results of a small clinical trial indicate. [More]
Required dose of saline solutions can prevent common injuries in football players

Required dose of saline solutions can prevent common injuries in football players

Some of the most common injuries in football players are violent joint sprains and muscle strains in the legs, which are sometimes caused by anxiety and fatigue accumulated after several games in a few weeks. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal molecular secret behind short, intense exercise

TSRI scientists reveal molecular secret behind short, intense exercise

In the last few years, the benefits of short, intense workouts have been extolled by both researchers and exercise fans as something of a metabolic panacea capable of providing greater overall fitness, better blood sugar control and weight reduction-all of it in periods as short as seven minutes a few times a week. [More]
Endocrine Society publishes Clinical Practice Guideline for treatment of rare adrenal tumors

Endocrine Society publishes Clinical Practice Guideline for treatment of rare adrenal tumors

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for the diagnosis and treatment of two types of rare adrenal tumors - pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas - that can raise the risk of cardiovascular disease and even death if left untreated. [More]
Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Adrenaline does not boost long-term survival rates in heart attack patients, says study

Giving patients adrenaline after they suffer a cardiac arrest outside of a hospital does not increase their prospects of surviving long-term, according to new research conducted at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Study links broken heart syndrome to natural disasters

Study links broken heart syndrome to natural disasters

Dramatic spikes in cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also called broken heart syndrome, were found in two states after major natural disasters, suggesting the stress of disasters as a likely trigger, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]
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