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Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications increases in IHD but levels still suboptimal

Treatment with life-saving medications has increased over the past ten years in ischaemic heart disease but levels are still suboptimal, according to the first results of the Chronic Ischaemic Cardiovascular Disease (CICD) Pilot Registry presented today at ESC Congress 2015 and published in European Heart Journal. [More]
Dementia brain imaging is helpful but not definitive, shows new research

Dementia brain imaging is helpful but not definitive, shows new research

MRI scans and other tools to detect and diagnose dementia are helpful but not definitive - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

The first-ever two-year outcomes from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) showcased at ESC Congress 2015 expose that all-cause death was the most frequent major event in more than 17,000 newly diagnosed AF patients, far exceeding the rate of stroke or major bleeding. [More]
Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

Global urinary catheters market to expand at 4.1% CAGR between 2015 and 2021

According to a new market report published by Persistence Market Research titled "Global Market Study on Urinary Catheters: Intermittent Catheters Segment to Witness Highest Growth by 2021", the urinary catheters market is expected to be valued at US$1,377.5 Mn by the end of 2015. It is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of4.1% from 2015 to 2021, to reach US$1,755.0 Mn by 2021. [More]
Number of dementia patients stabilizing experts claim

Number of dementia patients stabilizing experts claim

Risk of dementia may be falling due to improved education and living conditions, and better prevention and treatment of vascular diseases, highlighting the need for policies to improve health across the life course. [More]
MRI scanners can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to exact target sites in the body

MRI scanners can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to exact target sites in the body

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have discovered MRI scanners, normally used to produce images, can steer cell-based, tumour busting therapies to specific target sites in the body. [More]
Researchers describe central role of mTOR in ageing and age-related diseases

Researchers describe central role of mTOR in ageing and age-related diseases

For some, TOR may bring to mind a Celtic mountain or perhaps an Internet privacy group. In the world of molecular biology it's a cellular pathway that's found in everything from yeast to mammals. [More]
Retrieving eggs at earlier stage of fertility treatment may improve pregnancy rates for older women

Retrieving eggs at earlier stage of fertility treatment may improve pregnancy rates for older women

IVF success rates for women aged 43 and above could improve by retrieving eggs from their ovaries at an earlier stage of fertility treatment, according to a new study published today in the Journal of Endocrinology. [More]
Study: Chickenpox vaccination increases incidence of shingles in younger adults

Study: Chickenpox vaccination increases incidence of shingles in younger adults

Vaccinating one-year-olds against chickenpox could temporarily nearly double the incidence of shingles in the wider population, but in younger adults than previously thought. [More]
Laser eye surgery: a glimpse into the future - An interview with Professor Dan Reinstein

Laser eye surgery: a glimpse into the future - An interview with Professor Dan Reinstein

LASIK (Laser In Situ Keratomileusis) creates a hinged flap with a microkeratome and evaporating corneal tissue under the flap with an excimer laser. However, the concept that refractive error could be corrected by sculpting corneal stromal tissue to change corneal curvature was the brainchild of Jose Ignacio Barraquer Moner in 1948. [More]
UK's first cross sector International Dementia Conference to take place in November 2015

UK's first cross sector International Dementia Conference to take place in November 2015

Taking place 3 - 4 November 2015 at Vox Birmingham, the UK's first cross sector International Dementia Conference will bring together leading figures from across the world and from a variety of different industry backgrounds to learn and share ideas on the best solutions to tackle this global issue. [More]
New fly model developed to study motor neuron degeneration

New fly model developed to study motor neuron degeneration

Researchers at the Babraham Institute and University of Massachusetts Medical School in the United States have developed a new model to study motor neuron degeneration and have used this to identify three genes involved in the neurodegeneration process. These findings could have relevance for understanding the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other forms of motor neuron disease (MND). [More]
Modern living could lead to 'hidden' epidemic of neurological brain disease

Modern living could lead to 'hidden' epidemic of neurological brain disease

Modern living could be responsible for an 'almost epidemic' increase in neurological brain disease, according to new research from Bournemouth University. [More]
Researchers closer to understanding complicated brain chemistry behind Alzheimer's disease

Researchers closer to understanding complicated brain chemistry behind Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have discovered that a protein involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease also has properties that could be helpful for human health. [More]
Redox equilibrium may help identify new diagnostic biomarkers for ageing, neurodegenerative processes

Redox equilibrium may help identify new diagnostic biomarkers for ageing, neurodegenerative processes

The question of why we age is one of the most fascinating questions for humankind, but nothing close to a satisfactory answer has been found to date. [More]

New IMA device could improve diagnosis, treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain

More than 100 million people across Europe suffer from chronic musculoskeletal pain, with an estimated 40 per cent undiagnosed. Ageing populations throughout Europe means that this only going to increase in the coming years. [More]
Scientists study role of protein oxidation in the ageing process

Scientists study role of protein oxidation in the ageing process

Research published in the journal Cell Reports challenges the most popular theory about why our bodies deteriorate in old age. Scientists know that as we grow older our cells accumulate particles, called free radicals. [More]
Possible link discovered between common medications and falls in older men

Possible link discovered between common medications and falls in older men

Serious falls are more than twice as likely in older men who take medicines with anti-cholinergic properties - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty young and promising researchers from Nijmegen - eleven from Radboud University and nine from Radboudumc - are each to receive up to 250,000. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Veni grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme. [More]
New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

New paper describes positive effects of CRAC channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis

Researchers from CalciMedica, Inc. and the University of Liverpool today announced the publication of a paper describing positive effects of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in animal models of acute pancreatitis. The paper, titled "Inhibitors of ORAI1 prevent cytosolic calcium-associated injury of human pancreatic acinar cells and acute pancreatitis in 3 mouse models" appears in the August edition of the journal Gastroenterology. [More]
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