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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Researchers working to develop simple blood test to predict onset of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers working to develop simple blood test to predict onset of Alzheimer's disease

A research team, led by Cardiff University, has made a significant step towards the development of a simple blood test to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
SAGA funding initiative aims to advance understanding of potential sex differences in Alzheimer's

SAGA funding initiative aims to advance understanding of potential sex differences in Alzheimer's

The first-ever Alzheimer's Association Sex and Gender in Alzheimer's research grant awards will provide $2.2 million to nine projects to advance understanding of the disproportionate effect of Alzheimer's disease on women. [More]
Study shows how caffeine counteracts age-related cognitive deficits in animals

Study shows how caffeine counteracts age-related cognitive deficits in animals

A study published in the journal Scientific Reports from Nature publishing group, describes the mechanism by which caffeine counteracts age-related cognitive deficits in animals. [More]
Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars. [More]
Antipsychotic use linked to higher pneumonia risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Antipsychotic use linked to higher pneumonia risk in patients with Alzheimer's disease

Antipsychotic medications are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

Study examines link between PTSD and cognitive impairment in WTC responders without head injury

New research published by the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring confirms the connection between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cognitive impairment - in this case, among those who helped with search, rescue and cleanup efforts following the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks. [More]
Researchers find high levels of neurotoxins linked to Alzheimer's, ALS in fins and muscles of sharks

Researchers find high levels of neurotoxins linked to Alzheimer's, ALS in fins and muscles of sharks

In a new study, University of Miami scientists found high concentrations of toxins linked to neurodegenerative diseases in the fins and muscles of 10 species of sharks. [More]
New research finds decrease in brain blood flow after stopping exercise in healthy older adults

New research finds decrease in brain blood flow after stopping exercise in healthy older adults

We all know that we can quickly lose cardiovascular endurance if we stop exercising for a few weeks, but what impact does the cessation of exercise have on our brains? New research led by University of Maryland School of Public Health researchers examined cerebral blood flow in healthy, physically fit older adults (ages 50-80 years) before and after a 10-day period during which they stopped all exercise. [More]
Nicotinic receptors could be new therapeutic target to prevent memory loss linked to Alzheimer's

Nicotinic receptors could be new therapeutic target to prevent memory loss linked to Alzheimer's

Several scientific studies have indicated that nicotine may be beneficial for memory function. [More]
New test may help detect Parkinson's disease in early stages of illness

New test may help detect Parkinson's disease in early stages of illness

A test that can detect Parkinson's disease in the early stages of the illness has moved a step closer. [More]
Basic cell biology research into neurodegeneration may fuel understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Basic cell biology research into neurodegeneration may fuel understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Clinical trials and translational medicine have certainly given people hope and rapid pathways to cures for some of mankind's most troublesome diseases, but now is not the time to overlook the power of basic research, says UC Santa Barbara neuroscientist Kenneth S. Kosik. [More]
Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

For chemists like Sarah Reisman, professor of chemistry at Caltech, synthesizing molecules is like designing your own jigsaw puzzle. You know what the solved puzzle looks like--the molecule--and your job is to figure out the best pieces to use to put it together. [More]
Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes

Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes

As we age, our arteries gradually become less flexible, making it harder for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. [More]
Western dietary pattern linked to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Western dietary pattern linked to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer's disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer's disease are rising worldwide. [More]
People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the August 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model

Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model

Boosting levels of a specific protein in the brain alleviates hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease in a mouse model of the disorder, according to new research published online August 25, 2016 in Scientific Reports. [More]
Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
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