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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Salk Institute researchers reveal how to curb immune enthusiasm

Salk Institute researchers reveal how to curb immune enthusiasm

Normally when we think of viruses, from the common cold to HIV, we want to boost people's immunity to fight them. [More]
Tau pathology underlies deterioration of spatial cognition in Alzheimer's disease

Tau pathology underlies deterioration of spatial cognition in Alzheimer's disease

Columbia University Medical Center researchers have discovered that the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients is caused by the accumulation of tau protein in navigational nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Study identifies molecular signals that maintain nerve cell structures in the adult brain

Study identifies molecular signals that maintain nerve cell structures in the adult brain

Humans and other vertebrates depend on a portion of the brain called the hippocampus for learning, memory and their sense of location. Nerve cell structures in the adult hippocampus are sustained by factors whose identities have remained largely mysterious so far. [More]
Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Scanning a premature infant's brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain's white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study published in the January 18, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Onset of hypertension later in life linked to lower dementia risk, study finds

Onset of hypertension later in life linked to lower dementia risk, study finds

New study results published online today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association suggest that onset of high blood pressure later in life is associated with lower dementia risk after age 90, especially if hypertension is developed at age 80 or older. [More]
New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. [More]
Benzodiazepine-like drugs linked to increased stroke risk among Alzheimer's disease patients

Benzodiazepine-like drugs linked to increased stroke risk among Alzheimer's disease patients

The use of benzodiazepines and benzodiazepine-like drugs was associated with a 20 per cent increased risk of stroke among persons with Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

Concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline, research finds

New research has found concussions accelerate Alzheimer's disease-related brain atrophy and cognitive decline in people who are at genetic risk for the condition. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

Could pathogen infection really lead to Alzheimer’s?

New concepts of infectious disease are evolving with the realization that pathogens are key players in the development of progressive chronic diseases that originally were not thought to be infectious. Infection is well-known to be associated with numerous neurological diseases for which... [More]
AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline published by the American Academy of Neurology in the January 11, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Curcumin not likely to have therapeutic benefit, report reveals

Curcumin not likely to have therapeutic benefit, report reveals

Curcumin, a compound in turmeric, continues to be hailed as a natural treatment for a wide range of health conditions, including cancer and Alzheimer's disease [More]
Study identifies high levels of aluminium in the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease victims

Study identifies high levels of aluminium in the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease victims

A recently published study of the brains of familial Alzheimer's disease victims has found extremely high levels of aluminium in the tissue, announced Dr. Christopher Exley, researcher and professor at Keele University. [More]
Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

Genes implicated in rare pediatric epilepsy contribute to common forms of disorder, study finds

An international study led by Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers has found that several genes previously implicated only in rare, severe forms of pediatric epilepsy also contribute to common forms of the disorder. [More]
Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists discover gene that may open new door to developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Antidepressant use doubles hip fracture risk among elders with Alzheimer's disease

Antidepressant use doubles hip fracture risk among elders with Alzheimer's disease

Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Protein aggregation may trigger inflammatory response linked to neurodegenerative diseases

Protein aggregation may trigger inflammatory response linked to neurodegenerative diseases

A recent review article published online in The FASEB Journal points to the "trigger" for the inflammatory response, caused by the immune system, that precedes Alzheimer's disease and other neurological conditions. [More]
'Dementia gene' may offer protection against cognitive decline linked to parasitic diseases

'Dementia gene' may offer protection against cognitive decline linked to parasitic diseases

New research published online in The FASEB Journal, suggests that carriers of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele, which is the single strongest genetic predictor of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with cognitive decline and cardiovascular disease, may have a reduced risk of cognitive decline associated with parasitic diseases. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists identify key molecule that helps protect the central nervous system against sepsis

Mayo Clinic scientists identify key molecule that helps protect the central nervous system against sepsis

No effective therapy exists today for sepsis, an inflammatory storm that afflicts about 3 million Americans a year - killing up to half. [More]
Sedentary older adults likely to develop dementia as those with genetic risk factors, research finds

Sedentary older adults likely to develop dementia as those with genetic risk factors, research finds

Sedentary older adults with no genetic risk factors for dementia may be just as likely to develop the disease as those who are genetically predisposed, according to a major study which followed more than 1,600 Canadians over five years. [More]
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