Alzheimer's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Alzheimer's Disease News and Research Twitter

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

New class of compounds protect brain cells from traumatic brain injury

A new class of compounds has now been shown to protect brain cells from the type of damage caused by blast-mediated traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

Research gives scientists new insight into evolution of gibbon genome

A team led by an Oregon Health & Science University researcher has sequenced and annotated the genome of the only ape whose DNA had yet to be sequenced - the gibbon, an endangered small ape that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi contributes $2.5 million to CCNA for dementia research

Sanofi announced today its $2.5 million contribution to co-fund the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging, a partnership officially launched in Montreal today in the presence of The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health. [More]
New way to preserve flexibility and resilience of the brain

New way to preserve flexibility and resilience of the brain

As Alzheimer's disease progresses, it kills brain cells mainly in the hippocampus and cortex, leading to impairments in "neuroplasticity," the mechanism that affects learning, memory, and thinking. [More]
Alzheimer's disease report success in harnessing mouse's immune system to attack toxic proteins

Alzheimer's disease report success in harnessing mouse's immune system to attack toxic proteins

Alzheimer's disease experts at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere are reporting success in specifically harnessing a mouse's immune system to attack and remove the buildup of toxic proteins in the brain that are markers of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. [More]
AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. [More]
Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish "disease in a dish" models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer's disease to diabetes. [More]
Prana's PBT2 receives FDA Orphan Drug designation for treatment of Huntington disease

Prana's PBT2 receives FDA Orphan Drug designation for treatment of Huntington disease

Prana Biotechnology has today announced the US Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug designation to PBT2 for the treatment of Huntington Disease. [More]
Longer looks: Alzheimer's and a marriage; racism in medicine; abortion restrictions in Texas

Longer looks: Alzheimer's and a marriage; racism in medicine; abortion restrictions in Texas

The US, which has a mostly private health-care system, manages to spend more on its public health-care system than countries where the health-care system is almost entirely public. America's government spends more, as a percentage of the economy, on public health care than Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan or Australia. And then it spends even more than that on private health care. [More]
Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Sleep difficulties may be linked to faster rates of decline in brain volume, according to a study published in the September 3, 2014, online issue of Neurology-, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers examine risk of MCI and diabetes mellitus type 2 in middle-aged people

Researchers examine risk of MCI and diabetes mellitus type 2 in middle-aged people

In a large population-based study of randomly selected participants in Germany, researchers found that mild cognitive impairment (MCI) occurred twice more often in individuals diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2. [More]
Study for better understanding of neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory

Study for better understanding of neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory

A study just published in the prestigious Nature Neuroscience journal by, Sylvain Williams, PhD, and his team, of the Research Centre of the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University, opens the door towards better understanding of the neural circuitry and dynamic mechanisms controlling memory as well of the role of an essential element of the hippocampus - a sub-region named the subiculum. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]
Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

Bariatric surgery can provide valuable benefits to the brain

At bariatric facilities like Dr. Feiz and Associates, the life-changing benefits of bariatric surgery, including reduced risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and endocrine disorders are well established. [More]
New study reveals psychosocial health benefits for older adults who volunteer

New study reveals psychosocial health benefits for older adults who volunteer

Older adults who stay active by volunteering are getting more out of it than just an altruistic feeling - they are receiving a health boost! [More]
Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

The failing in the work of nerve cells: An international team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Chris Meisinger from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Freiburg has discovered how Alzheimer's disease damages mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. [More]
New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. [More]
THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. [More]