Alzheimer's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Alzheimer's Disease News and Research Twitter

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

Experimental drug may prevent development of multiple sclerosis in mice

The experimental drug laquinimod may prevent the development or reduce the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to research published in the September 21, 2016, online issue of Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
MR Solutions receives order for cryogen-free 7T simultaneous PET-MR preclinical imaging system

MR Solutions receives order for cryogen-free 7T simultaneous PET-MR preclinical imaging system

MR Solutions has received an order for a high-powered 7T, cryogen-free, preclinical PET-MRI multi-modality imaging system from the newly formed pre-clinical imaging resource at the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute (ZNI) at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Texas A&M research shows nicotine could help protect brain aging

Texas A&M research shows nicotine could help protect brain aging

Everyone knows that tobacco products are bad for your health, and even the new e-cigarettes may have harmful toxins. [More]
CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment

CHOP researchers exploit gene discovery in severe epilepsy to identify precision treatment

An international team of researchers who discovered a new gene disorder that causes severe childhood epilepsy leveraged that finding to reduce seizures in two children. [More]
Researchers identify genetic switch that may be potential target for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers identify genetic switch that may be potential target for Alzheimer's disease

A team at the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, based at Imperial College London, has found an important part of the machinery that switches on a gene known to protect against Alzheimer's Disease. [More]
Study of classical Chinese medical literature finds references similar to Alzheimer's disease

Study of classical Chinese medical literature finds references similar to Alzheimer's disease

A new study of classical Chinese medical texts identifies references to age-related memory impairment similar to modern-day Alzheimer's disease, and to several plant-based ingredients used centuries ago -- and still in use today -- to treat memory impairment. [More]
Researchers reveal presence of toxic protein aggregates in the human brain

Researchers reveal presence of toxic protein aggregates in the human brain

The following factors facilitate the formation of putatively toxic structures in the neuronal nuclei of Alzheimer's patients. [More]
Women, minorities less likely to receive stroke treatment, study finds

Women, minorities less likely to receive stroke treatment, study finds

Women and minorities may be less likely to receive treatment for stroke, according to a study published in the September 14, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Wayne State receives NIH funding to advance brain aging research

Wayne State receives NIH funding to advance brain aging research

Wayne State University has received a $3.6 million grant from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health for a project that will advance knowledge of brain aging, its relation to cognitive performance and the role of common vascular and metabolic risk factors in shaping the trajectories of aging. [More]
Mood stabilizers may decrease negative symptoms in psychiatric patients with specific genotype

Mood stabilizers may decrease negative symptoms in psychiatric patients with specific genotype

A drug prescribed to many patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may decrease negative symptoms for people with a certain variant of the COMT gene, suggests a new study from researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country's most significant health care challenge is cancer. [More]
Online articles about preventing Alzheimer's disease offer poor advice, research finds

Online articles about preventing Alzheimer's disease offer poor advice, research finds

New UBC research finds that many online resources for preventing Alzheimer's disease are problematic and could be steering people in the wrong direction. [More]
Memory loss symptoms not sufficient to diagnose other forms of Alzheimer's

Memory loss symptoms not sufficient to diagnose other forms of Alzheimer's

Relying on clinical symptoms of memory loss to diagnose Alzheimer's disease may miss other forms of dementia caused by Alzheimer's that don't initially affect memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Moderately vigorous physical activity in midlife linked to better cognition at old age

Moderately vigorous physical activity in midlife linked to better cognition at old age

A new study of 3050 twins finds moderately vigorous physical activity - i.e., more strenuous than walking - to be associated with better cognition in a 25-year follow-up. [More]
International conference on longevity to be held in Brussels for 3 days

International conference on longevity to be held in Brussels for 3 days

The Eurosymposium on Healthy Ageing is an international event that provides a unique opportunity for researchers, government officials, biotech executives, entrepreneurs, and non-governmental institutions from around the world to meet, network, and forge new scientific collaborations. [More]
Different types of stroke have diverse risk profiles in overweight or obese women

Different types of stroke have diverse risk profiles in overweight or obese women

According to new research, women who are overweight or obese may have an increased risk of the most common kind of stroke, called ischemic stroke, but a decreased risk of a more often deadly stroke, called hemorrhagic stroke. [More]
Scientists outline criteria for assessing vascular cognitive impairment in post-mortem brain tissue

Scientists outline criteria for assessing vascular cognitive impairment in post-mortem brain tissue

New research, led by academics at the University of Bristol, has outlined the first validated set of pathological criteria for assessing the likelihood that cognitive impairment was caused by vascular disease. [More]
New PET scan can detect prostate cancer earlier than MRIs and CT scans

New PET scan can detect prostate cancer earlier than MRIs and CT scans

Loyola Medicine is the first center in the Midwest to offer the first effective PET/CT scan for prostate cancer patients. [More]
Scientists developing virtual reality-based early diagnosis system for neurodegenerative disorders

Scientists developing virtual reality-based early diagnosis system for neurodegenerative disorders

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University and Siberian State Medical University are developing an early diagnosis system for neurodegenerative disorders. [More]
Predictive testing of Alzheimer's disease may have major psychological impact on patients

Predictive testing of Alzheimer's disease may have major psychological impact on patients

What are the expectations of persons who decide to have their risk of Alzheimer's Disease tested? What should doctors pay attention to when ascertaining individual risks? What is the benefit of risk determination for patients and their close others, while options to treat the disease remain insufficient? [More]
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