Alzheimer's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Alzheimer's Disease News and Research Twitter

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Transcranial alternating current stimulation during sleep can enhance memory in healthy people

Transcranial alternating current stimulation during sleep can enhance memory in healthy people

When you sleep, your brain is busy storing and consolidating things you learned that day, stuff you'll need in your memory toolkit tomorrow, next week, or next year. For many people, especially those with neurological conditions, memory impairment can be a debilitating symptom that affects every-day life in profound ways [More]
Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect

Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect

An updated recommendation from the American Academy of Neurology states that catheter-based closure should not be routinely recommended for people who have had a stroke and also have a heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO), a channel between the top two chambers in the heart. [More]
Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer's patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. [More]
New research elucidates details about architecture of synaptic transmission

New research elucidates details about architecture of synaptic transmission

For more than a century, neuroscientists have known that nerve cells talk to one another across the small gaps between them, a process known as synaptic transmission. [More]
New consensus statement recommends transition of care for adolescents with neurologic disorders

New consensus statement recommends transition of care for adolescents with neurologic disorders

A new consensus statement provides recommendations for transitioning adolescents and young adults with neurologic disorders to adult care. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers identify new mechanisms capable of suppressing propagation of HCV

Researchers at Osaka University, Japan uncovered the mechanisms that suppress the propagation of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the potential of improving pathological liver conditions. [More]
Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Two studies involving University of Waterloo researchers presented this week at the 2016 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto highlight a new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms as well as the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario. [More]
Study examines efficacy of two treatments for mild cognitive impairment

Study examines efficacy of two treatments for mild cognitive impairment

A randomized controlled study has evaluated the effects of two treatments for mild cognitive impairment. [More]
Researchers discover pathway linking oxidative stress and cysteine in Huntington's disease

Researchers discover pathway linking oxidative stress and cysteine in Huntington's disease

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified a biochemical pathway linking oxidative stress and the amino acid cysteine in Huntington's disease. [More]
Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease

Odor identification test may help detect early-stage Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, New York State Psychiatric Institute, and NewYork-Presbyterian reported that an odor identification test may prove useful in predicting cognitive decline and detecting early-stage Alzheimer's disease. [More]
First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

First confirmed case of Alzheimer’s disease in HIV-positive patient to be presented at AAIC 2016

The first case of Alzheimer's disease diagnosed in an HIV-positive individual will be presented in a poster session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2016 in Toronto July 27. [More]
Embryonic stem cell gene Nanog holds potential for reversing effects of aging

Embryonic stem cell gene Nanog holds potential for reversing effects of aging

The fountain of youth may reside in an embryonic stem cell gene named Nanog. [More]
Duke to lead early-stage clinical trials for promising new neurological therapies

Duke to lead early-stage clinical trials for promising new neurological therapies

Duke University could receive up to $19 million to lead early-stage clinical trials for new drugs to treat neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and neuropathy. [More]
New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

New neuroprotective compounds may prevent development of epilepsy

A team led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence, has developed neuroprotective compounds that may prevent the development of epilepsy. [More]
New protein may help scientists understand role of Abeta in Alzheimer's disease

New protein may help scientists understand role of Abeta in Alzheimer's disease

A new protein which will help scientists to understand why nerve cells die in people with Alzheimer's disease has been designed in a University of Sussex laboratory. [More]
Cinnamon treatment turns poor-learning mice into good ones, research shows

Cinnamon treatment turns poor-learning mice into good ones, research shows

If Dr. Kalipada Pahan's research pans out, the standard advice for failing students might one day be: Study harder and eat your cinnamon! [More]
Long-term antibiotic treatment slows progression of Alzheimer's disease through changes in gut bacteria

Long-term antibiotic treatment slows progression of Alzheimer's disease through changes in gut bacteria

Long-term treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics decreased levels of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and activated inflammatory microglial cells in the brains of mice in a new study by neuroscientists from the University of Chicago. [More]
TSRI study reveals new approach to intervene in deadly disease

TSRI study reveals new approach to intervene in deadly disease

In a new study, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified drug candidates that can boost a cell's ability to catch the "typos" in protein production that can cause a deadly disease called amyloidosis. [More]
NYU Langone launches Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Family Support Program for caregivers

NYU Langone launches Alzheimer's and Related Dementias Family Support Program for caregivers

Two new grants from the New York State Department of Health will enable New Yorkers with Alzheimer's diseaseand dementia, and their families, to get the most comprehensive care and support services available in the New York City area. [More]
Discriminating remembrance may be marker for early stages of memory loss in older adults

Discriminating remembrance may be marker for early stages of memory loss in older adults

People who selectively recalled positive information over neutral and negative information performed worse on memory tests conducted by University of California, Irvine neurobiologists, who said the results suggest that this discriminating remembrance may be a marker for early stages of memory loss in the elderly. [More]
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