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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Iron may underlie effect of Alzheimer’s risk allele

Iron may underlie effect of Alzheimer’s risk allele

Ferritin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the APOE ε4 risk allele and predicts cognitive outcomes, a study shows. [More]
People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with cognitive impairment have altered responses to pain

People with dementia and other forms of cognitive impairment (CI) have altered responses to pain, with many conditions associated with increased pain sensitivity, concludes a research review in PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]
Main culprit of Alzheimer's disease causes memory loss

Main culprit of Alzheimer's disease causes memory loss

The study, published May 29 in the open access Nature Publishing Group journal Scientific Reports, reveals a direct link between the main culprit of Alzheimer's disease and memory loss. [More]
RI-MUHC researchers receive $1.5 million to develop glutamate biosensor platform for brain diseases

RI-MUHC researchers receive $1.5 million to develop glutamate biosensor platform for brain diseases

In the human brain and retina, glutamate is an important messenger that carries information from one neuron to another. The level of glutamate transmitted between neurons is crucial to cell communication: too high and neurons die, too low and the information is not communicated properly. In either case this can contribute to neurological diseases including stroke, glaucoma, and Alzheimer's. [More]
People with MS have much greater risk of dying younger compared to people without MS

People with MS have much greater risk of dying younger compared to people without MS

New research suggests people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have double the risk of dying early compared to people without MS, with those younger than 59 at a three times higher risk. The study is published in the May 27, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Data supporting anti-cancer potential of Biscayne’s GHRH antagonist to be discussed at ASCO Annual Meeting

Data supporting anti-cancer potential of Biscayne’s GHRH antagonist to be discussed at ASCO Annual Meeting

Biscayne Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced that data supporting the anti-cancer potential of its growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) technology will be discussed in a poster presentation at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting. [More]
Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

CQDM, Brain Canada and the Ontario Brain Institute award close to $8.5M to six (6) multi-disciplinary and multi-provincial research teams across Canada to address unmet needs in neuroscience within their Focus on Brain strategic initiative. To this amount, $1.5M is added from the various research entities involved as in-kind contributions. [More]
New in vitro system could become important tool in search for potential drugs against Alzheimer’s

New in vitro system could become important tool in search for potential drugs against Alzheimer’s

A typical characteristic of the brain of an Alzheimer sufferer is the presence of insoluble Tau protein aggregates. Scientists at VIB, KU Leuven and Janssen Pharmaceutica have demonstrated that the distribution of these aggregates through the brain is facilitated by synaptic connections between brain cells. [More]
Previous motherhood alters cognition, neuroplasticity in response to hormone therapy

Previous motherhood alters cognition, neuroplasticity in response to hormone therapy

Hormone therapy (HT) is prescribed to alleviate some of the symptoms of menopause in women. Menopausal women are more likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease but not other forms of dementia, and HT has been prescribed to treat cognitive decline in post-menopausal women with variable degrees of effectiveness. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]

Decreased removal of toxic peptides causes onset of Alzheimer's disease

Jens Pahnke and his team at the University of Oslo has recently published results in the prestigious scientific journal 'BRAIN' showing that decreased removal of toxic peptides in the brain causes the onset and first clinical signs of Alzheimer's disease, rather than overproduction as has previously been assumed. This information can now be used to target specific genes to enhance their function in the brain of elderly or people at risk. [More]
Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer's disease

Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by Alzheimer's disease, according to a groundbreaking Iowa State University study. [More]
Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support the contention that athletes are uniquely at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) or other neurodegenerative disorders, according to a review in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids improve cognitive flexibility in older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease

A study of older adults at risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease found that those who consumed more omega-3 fatty acids did better than their peers on tests of cognitive flexibility -- the ability to efficiently switch between tasks -- and had a bigger anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region known to contribute to cognitive flexibility. [More]
vTv Therapeutics enrolls first patients in azeliragon Phase 3 trial for treatment of mild Alzheimer's disease

vTv Therapeutics enrolls first patients in azeliragon Phase 3 trial for treatment of mild Alzheimer's disease

vTv Therapeutics LLC today announced enrollment of the first patients into STEADFAST (Single Trial Evaluating Alzheimer's Disease Following Addition to Symptomatic Therapy), vTv's Phase 3 placebo controlled trial of azeliragon, an oral antagonist of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) for treatment of mild Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Study: Air pollution, impaired lung function independently affect cognition

Studies have shown that both air pollution and impaired lung function can cause cognitive deficits, but it was unclear whether air pollution diminishes cognition by reducing breathing ability first or whether air pollution represents an independent risk factor for cognitive deficit. [More]
Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions

Grass plants can bind, uptake and transport infectious prions, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Research leads way for noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer

Led by Georgia State University, researchers have developed the first robust and noninvasive detection of early stage liver cancer and liver metastases, in addition to other liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and liver fibrosis. [More]
Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the research arm of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and SetPoint Medical Inc., a biomedical technology company, today released the results of research on the therapeutic potential of vagus nerve stimulation. In a paper published by Bioelectronic Medicine, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, and his colleagues at the Feinstein Institute, explore how low-level electrical stimulation interacts with the body's nerves to reduce inflammation, a fundamental goal of bioelectronic medicine. [More]
Denali launched to discover, develop effective medicines for neurodegenerative diseases

Denali launched to discover, develop effective medicines for neurodegenerative diseases

Denali Therapeutics Inc., a new biotechnology company focused on developing effective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, announced today that it has launched with an initial investment commitment of $217 million. [More]
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