Alzheimer's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Alzheimer's Disease News and Research Twitter

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Lewy body dementia: 10 things people need to know

Lewy body dementia: 10 things people need to know

The recent news that the brain of actor/comedian Robin Williams showed signs of diffuse Lewy body disease has created more interest and coverage in this widely under-diagnosed condition than ever before. [More]
Protein that awakens brain from sleep may fight against Alzheimer's disease

Protein that awakens brain from sleep may fight against Alzheimer's disease

A protein that stimulates the brain to awaken from sleep may be a target for preventing Alzheimer's disease, a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests. [More]
New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

A new, enhanced MRI diagnostic approach was, for the first time, able to identify significant damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of professional football players following "unreported" trauma or mild concussions. Published in the current issue of JAMA Neurology, this study could improve decision making on when an athlete should "return to play." [More]
Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. [More]
Researchers identify way to improve memory by manipulating molecule linked to Alzheimer's

Researchers identify way to improve memory by manipulating molecule linked to Alzheimer's

In a new study conducted by the Sagol Department of Neurobiology at the University of Haifa and published recently in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers report that they've found a way to improve memory by manipulating a specific molecule that is known to function poorly in old age and is closely linked to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
University of Texas student receives Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship

University of Texas student receives Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship

Veronica Garcia, a student at The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, has been awarded a Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Special receptor signalling mediates astrocytic hyperactivity in  Alzheimer's disease mouse model

Special receptor signalling mediates astrocytic hyperactivity in Alzheimer's disease mouse model

It has long been known that astrocytes change their shapes as a consequence of Alzheimer's. Cells located near the "plaques", as the protein deposits typical for this disease are called, grow in size and form additional extensions. [More]
People who handle complex jobs may have longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities

People who handle complex jobs may have longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities

People whose jobs require more complex work with other people, such as social workers and lawyers, or with data, like architects or graphic designers, may end up having longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities compared to people who do less complex work, according to research published in the November 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

Changes in one gene can influence person's cholesterol levels from midlife through late life

It's known that cholesterol levels typically rise as people age and that high cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. What's less known is that cholesterol levels begin to decline the more a person ages. Recently, researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and the University of Kentucky found that differences in one gene can influence a person's cholesterol levels from midlife to late life. [More]
Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University. [More]
RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

RI-MUHC-led study identifies new player in brain function and memory

Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

Researchers identify molecular switch that controls inflammatory processes in aging-related disorders

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified what appears to be a molecular switch controlling inflammatory processes involved in conditions ranging from muscle atrophy to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Focusing on comorbidity and disabilities can reduce healthcare costs in aging population

Focusing on comorbidity and disabilities can reduce healthcare costs in aging population

As our society ages, a University of Montreal study suggests the health system should be focusing on comorbidity and specific types of disabilities that are associated with higher health care costs for seniors, especially cognitive disabilities. [More]
Multi-institutional study establishes new criteria for Alzheimer's-related memory disorder

Multi-institutional study establishes new criteria for Alzheimer's-related memory disorder

A multi-institutional study has defined and established criteria for a new neurological disease closely resembling Alzheimer's disease called primary age-related tauopathy (PART). [More]
Study defines, establishes criteria for primary age-related tauopathy

Study defines, establishes criteria for primary age-related tauopathy

A multi-institutional study has defined and established criteria for a new neurological disease closely resembling Alzheimer's disease called primary age-related tauopathy (PART). Patients with PART develop cognitive impairment that can be indistinguishable from Alzheimer's disease, but they lack amyloid plaques. Awareness of this neurological disease will help doctors diagnose and develop more effective treatments for patients with different types of memory impairment. [More]
Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]
Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced the award of NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants valued at $1.5 million to 15 scientists, who are full professors or the equivalent, conducting innovative projects in diverse areas of neurobiological and behavioral research. [More]
Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Synapses are the sites that connect neurons – sites where information is passed from one neuron to another. They are highly specialized structures and synaptic function is crucial for normal brain function. [More]
Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

Anxiety can accelerate conversion to Alzheimer's disease for people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at increased risk of converting to Alzheimer's disease within a few years, but a new study warns the risk increases significantly if they suffer from anxiety. [More]