Alzheimer's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Alzheimer's Disease News and Research Twitter

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Scientists devise new radiation-free probe for imaging molecules in the brain

Scientists devise new radiation-free probe for imaging molecules in the brain

Scientists hoping to get a glimpse of molecules that control brain activity have devised a new probe that allows them to image these molecules without using any chemical or radioactive labels. [More]
IUPUI scientists develop new synthetic method to shorten drug discovery and development process

IUPUI scientists develop new synthetic method to shorten drug discovery and development process

Synthesizing useful new compounds is what pharmaceutical discovery and development is all about. Researchers at the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis have devised a method to substantially speed up the process. [More]
OHSU scientists identify potential target for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease

OHSU scientists identify potential target for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease

A new scientific discovery may provide a future avenue for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at NEOMED have just identified a major connection between areas of the brainstem - the ancient area that controls mood, sleep and metabolism - and detrimental changes to bone in a preclinical model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Babies born with low levels of vitamin D may be more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life than babies with higher levels of vitamin D, according to a study published in the November 30, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers find differences in use of prescription analgesics between people with and without Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers find differences in use of prescription analgesics between people with and without Alzheimer’s disease

Approximately one third of persons with Alzheimer’s disease use prescription medicines for pain after their diagnosis, reports a recent study conducted at the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Aerobic activity offers greater preservation of brain volume, improves cognitive performance

Aerobic activity offers greater preservation of brain volume, improves cognitive performance

Using a new MRI technique, researchers found that adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who exercised four times a week over a six-month period experienced an increase in brain volume in specific, or local, areas of the brain, but adults who participated in aerobic exercise experienced greater gains than those who just stretched. [More]
Problems linked to gait can predict decline in memory and thinking

Problems linked to gait can predict decline in memory and thinking

Walking is a milestone in development for toddlers, but it's actually only one part of the complex cognitive task known as gait that includes everything from a person's stride length to the accompanying swing of each arm. [More]
Research aims to incorporate cardiorespiratory fitness measurements into clinical practice

Research aims to incorporate cardiorespiratory fitness measurements into clinical practice

A new Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association led by Queen's University professor Robert Ross provides unequivocal evidence to confirm that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), a reflection of overall cardiovascular health, should be measured in clinical practice to provide additional information for patient management. [More]
Study finds abnormally low blood flow in the brain of marijuana users

Study finds abnormally low blood flow in the brain of marijuana users

As the U.S. races to legalize marijuana for medicinal and recreational use, a new, large scale brain imaging study gives reason for caution. [More]
Research identifies presence of neuron-producing stem cells in meninges

Research identifies presence of neuron-producing stem cells in meninges

A multidisciplinary research, conceived by Dr. Francesco Bifari, Department of Medical Biotechnology and Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Italy and Dr. Ilaria Decimo University of Verona, Italy, found that meninges - the protective membranes that enclose the brain - contain of a pool of neural stem cells. [More]
Understanding nucleation process could be critical for treating Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes

Understanding nucleation process could be critical for treating Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes

Whether it is clouds or champagne bubbles forming, or the early onset of Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes, a common mechanism is at work: nucleation processes. [More]
New study finds downward trend in dementia prevalence among American seniors

New study finds downward trend in dementia prevalence among American seniors

In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation's brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds. [More]
Researchers call sun avoidance as emerging health problem in the U.S.

Researchers call sun avoidance as emerging health problem in the U.S.

A landmark study published Friday in the Journal Dermato-Endocrinology has world-renowned researchers calling insufficient sun exposure an emerging health problem in the United States. [More]
Research provides new insight into possible causes of AMD among older people

Research provides new insight into possible causes of AMD among older people

Research from the University of Southampton gives new insight into possible causes of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss among people aged 50 and older. [More]
Study compares risk of pneumonia linked to using different antidementia drugs

Study compares risk of pneumonia linked to using different antidementia drugs

A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that among users of antidementia drugs, persons using memantine have the highest risk of pneumonia. The use of rivastigmine patches is associated with an increased risk as well. [More]
Study finds way to detect early signs of AD by looking at retina of patients' eyes

Study finds way to detect early signs of AD by looking at retina of patients' eyes

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston offers important insight into how Alzheimer's disease begins within the brain. [More]
Scientists map reorganization of genetic material in cells using 3-D imaging technique

Scientists map reorganization of genetic material in cells using 3-D imaging technique

Scientists have mapped the reorganization of genetic material that takes place when a stem cell matures into a nerve cell. [More]
Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

A new study shows a link between mothers with rheumatoid arthritis and children with epilepsy. [More]
Atrial fibrillation patients treated with anticoagulant drug have higher risk of developing dementia

Atrial fibrillation patients treated with anticoagulant drug have higher risk of developing dementia

Atrial fibrillation patients who use the drug, warfarin, to prevent harmful blood clots from forming in their hearts to lower risk of stroke are at higher risk of developing dementia than patients who use warfarin for non-atrial fibrillation conditions, according to a new study from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute. [More]
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