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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of US population can't be transported by ambulance to stroke center within one hour

One-third of the US population does not have access to a primary stroke center within one hour by ambulance, and even under optimal conditions, a large proportion of the US would be unable to access a stroke center within this window, according to a new study published in the March 4, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study shows how mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease lead to neurodegeneration, dementia

Study shows how mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease lead to neurodegeneration, dementia

A study from researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital reveals for the first time exactly how mutations associated with the most common form of inherited Alzheimer's disease produce the disorder's devastating effects. [More]
Researchers discover retina protein crucial for vision

Researchers discover retina protein crucial for vision

Research led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of the LSU Health New Orleans Neuroscience Center of Excellence, discovered a protein in the retina that is crucial for vision. The paper reports, for the first time, the key molecular mechanisms leading to visual degeneration and blindness. [More]
Resverlogix, Emerald Logic complete collaborative research program

Resverlogix, Emerald Logic complete collaborative research program

Resverlogix Corp. today announced that it has completed a collaborative research program with Emerald Logic, a leader in quantitative analytics. Using Fast Collective Evolution Technology (FACET), Emerald Logic analyzed Resverlogix's complete clinical dataset including all measurements obtained from each of 798 patients who participated in the Company's Phase 2 clinical trials ASSERT, SUSTAIN and ASSURE. [More]
Grifols, Alkahest sign definitive agreements

Grifols, Alkahest sign definitive agreements

Grifols, a global healthcare company and leading producer of plasma therapies, and Alkahest, a Redwood City, California based, privately held biopharmaceutical company founded upon the pioneering work of Dr. Tony Wyss-Coray and other leading scientists at Stanford University, today announced that they have signed definitive agreements whereby Grifols will make a major equity investment in Alkahest, and the companies will work together to develop novel plasma-based products for the treatment of cognitive decline in aging and disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), including Alzheimer's. [More]
Non-drug approaches work better in people with Alzheimer's disease, dementia

Non-drug approaches work better in people with Alzheimer's disease, dementia

Doctors write millions of prescriptions a year for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. But non-drug approaches actually work better, and carry far fewer risks, experts conclude in a new report. [More]
UCLA life scientists develop new method to find genetic markers for many diseases

UCLA life scientists develop new method to find genetic markers for many diseases

UCLA life scientists have created an accurate new method to identify genetic markers for many diseases -- a significant step toward a new era of personalized medicine, tailored to each person's DNA and RNA. [More]
Study associates heart function with development of Alzheimer's disease

Study associates heart function with development of Alzheimer's disease

A healthier heart could prevent Alzheimer's disease, according to new research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]
TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. [More]
Toning down TREM2 receptor's activity may help prevent neurodegeneration in AD patients

Toning down TREM2 receptor's activity may help prevent neurodegeneration in AD patients

Tackling brain inflammation ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]
People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes more prone to depression, anxiety

People with diabetes are more prone to anxiety and depression than those with other chronic diseases that require similar levels of management. The reasons for this aren't well understood, but Joslin Diabetes Center researchers have discovered one potential explanation. [More]
Transition completes enrolment of patients in ELND005 Phase 2 study for treatment of AD patients

Transition completes enrolment of patients in ELND005 Phase 2 study for treatment of AD patients

Transition Therapeutics Inc. announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, Transition Therapeutics Ireland Limited completed enrolment of the Phase 2 clinical study evaluating neuropsychiatric drug candidate ELND005 as a treatment for agitation and aggression in patients with mild, moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease ("AD"). [More]
Scientists discover amyloid accumulation in young human brains

Scientists discover amyloid accumulation in young human brains

Amyloid -- an abnormal protein whose accumulation in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease -- starts accumulating inside neurons of people as young as 20, a much younger age than scientists ever imagined, reports a surprising new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities for TBI

New technology being introduced at NYU Langone Medical Center could help researchers advance blood biomarker capabilities that show changes in low concentrations of specific proteins present following a neurological injury. [More]
New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

New pharmacological compounds block nerve cell damage in mouse models of MS

A newly characterized group of pharmacological compounds block both the inflammation and nerve cell damage seen in mouse models of multiple sclerosis, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this week in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Intrinsically disordered proteins have ability to alter their configuration

Intrinsically disordered proteins have ability to alter their configuration

Like the shape-shifting robots of "Transformers" fame, a unique class of proteins in the human body also has the ability to alter their configuration. These so-named intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a fixed or ordered three-dimensional structure, which can be influenced by exposure to various chemicals and cellular modifications. [More]
New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]