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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Novel combination therapy may help provide clinically successful treatment for AD

Novel combination therapy may help provide clinically successful treatment for AD

Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenolic phytochemical produced in several plants, especially grapes skin and seeds. One epidemiological study reported a positive association between moderate red wine consumption and a low incidence of cardiovascular disease, known as the "French Paradox." [More]
Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

A new grant to the Indiana University Center for Aging Research from the National Institute on Aging funds the first study to assess the potential benefits and harms to family members of early dementia screening of older adults. [More]
University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and occurs in all ethnic and racial groups. It affects more than 5 million people age 65 and older in the United States alone and there is currently no effective treatment or cure. [More]
Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. [More]
Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

More people may have the potential to develop Huntington's disease than previously thought, according to a study published in the June 22, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
SORLA protein makes fat cells oversensitive to insulin

SORLA protein makes fat cells oversensitive to insulin

SORLA is a protein that influences the balance of metabolic processes in adipose tissue, a particular form of fat. Too much of it makes fat cells overly sensitive to insulin, which leads them to break down less fat. SORLA was previously known for its protective role in Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Drugs used to treat diabetes could also be used to treat Alzheimer's disease, and vice versa, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen. [More]
Scientific paper supports concept of CarThera's intracranial ultrasound implant to disrupt blood-brain barrier

Scientific paper supports concept of CarThera's intracranial ultrasound implant to disrupt blood-brain barrier

CarThera, a French company based at the Brain and Spine Institute, that designs and develops innovative ultrasound-based medical devices to treat brain disorders, today announces the publication in Science Translational Medicine of a scientific paper on initial successes in disrupting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with the use of ultrasound. [More]
Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their demonstrated role in processes underlying cognition such as synaptic facilitation, and theta and gamma wave activity. [More]
Epilepsy in immediate family member may increase person’s chances of being diagnosed with autism

Epilepsy in immediate family member may increase person’s chances of being diagnosed with autism

Having a first-degree relative with epilepsy may increase a person's risk of being diagnosed with autism, according to a study published in the June 15, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk

Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk

Cerebral vessel disease may be an under-recognised risk factor for Alzheimer's disease dementia, say researchers. [More]
Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging. [More]
Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Women live longer than men. This simple statement holds a tantalizing riddle that Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham explore in a perspective piece published in Cell Metabolism on June 14. [More]
New UCLA study reveals strategy to fight against pesticide-associated Parkinson’s disease

New UCLA study reveals strategy to fight against pesticide-associated Parkinson’s disease

Exposure to a group of common pesticides, called dithiocarbamates, has long been associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, although the mechanism by which the compounds exert their toxicity on the brain has not been completely understood. [More]
Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers find new method to replicate one of earliest changes in Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers at the Babraham Institute have found a way to replicate one of the earliest changes in Alzheimer's disease in a dish. This means that it should now be possible to find out a lot more about why it happens - and how to stop it. The new findings are published in the journal Molecular Neurodegeneration and supported by the charity Alzheimer's Research UK. [More]
Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that strategy-based reasoning training can improve the cognitive performance for those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical stage of those at risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. [More]
New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease

New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease

Much of the research on Alzheimer's disease has focused on the amyloid beta protein, which clumps together into sticky fibrils that form deposits in the brains of people with the disease. [More]
New drug for chronic migraine may reduce headache hours in few days

New drug for chronic migraine may reduce headache hours in few days

A new drug to prevent migraine was associated with fewer headache hours for people with chronic migraine within three to seven days after the first injection, according to a study published in the June 8, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
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