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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

New UCL research reveals how past events are reconstructed in the brain

When remembering something from our past, we often vividly re-experience the whole episode in which it occurred. New UCL research funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust has now revealed how this might happen in the brain. [More]
Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants may benefit people with Alzheimer's disease

Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants may benefit people with Alzheimer's disease

Here's more evidence that fish oil supplementation and antioxidants might be beneficial for at least some people facing Alzheimer's disease: A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal describes the findings of a very small study in which people with mild clinical impairment, such as those in the very early stages of the disease, saw clearance of the hallmark amyloid-beta protein and reduced inflammation in neurological tissues. [More]
New technique that mines Twitter data can help identify potentially dangerous drug interactions

New technique that mines Twitter data can help identify potentially dangerous drug interactions

A team of scientists has invented a new technique for discovering potentially dangerous drug interactions and unknown side-effects — before they show up in medical databases, like PubMed, or even before doctors and researchers have heard of them at all. [More]
Axovant Sciences accepts two presentations at Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015

Axovant Sciences accepts two presentations at Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015

Axovant Sciences Ltd., a leading clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the treatment of dementia, today announced the acceptance of two presentations at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 (AAIC) being held in Washington, D.C. from July 18-23, 2015. [More]
Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two of the nation's leading physician-scientists in the search to better understand and treat Alzheimer's disease - William Mobley, MD, PhD, and Michael Rafii, MD, PhD - have been named interim co-directors of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a major initiative formed in 1991 as a cooperative agreement between the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the University of California, San Diego. [More]
Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem's HK532-IGF-1 neural stem cells therapy for Alzheimer's disease presented at ISSCR Annual Meeting

Neuralstem, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company using neural stem cell technology to develop small molecule and cell therapy treatments for central nervous system diseases, announced that the poster "Human Neural Stem Cells Expressing IGF-1: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease" was presented yesterday at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden. [More]
Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

Study: High blood pressure linked to lower risk for Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with a genetic predisposition to high blood pressure have a lower risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Hartmuth Kolb named recipient of 2015 Alzheimer Award

Hartmuth Kolb named recipient of 2015 Alzheimer Award

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is proud to announce that Hartmuth Kolb, PhD, Head of Neuroscience Biomarkers, Johnson & Johnson, San Diego, CA, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2015 Alzheimer Award presented by the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease in recognition of his outstanding work on the importance and imaging of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

Different neurobiological pathways lead to expression of Alzheimer's disease

The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) posits that sticky aggregations or plaques of amyloid-beta peptides accumulate over time in the brain, triggering a series of events that ultimately result in the full-blown neurodegenerative disorder. The hypothesis has been a major driver of AD research for more than 20 years. [More]
Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed. The research is published in the June 24, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study reveals differences in the way brain inflammation is expressed in people with Down syndrome, AD

Study reveals differences in the way brain inflammation is expressed in people with Down syndrome, AD

Researchers at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging have completed a study that revealed differences in the way brain inflammation -- considered a key component of AD-- is expressed in different subsets of patients, in particular people with Down syndrome (DS) and AD. [More]
University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the fourth Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, professor of surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The award is in recognition of his research in organ transplantation and alloengraftment mechanisms. [More]
Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. Based on language impairments caused by stroke, scientists believed a single area of the brain -- a hotdog shaped section in the temporal lobe of the left hemisphere called Wernicke's region -- was the center of language comprehension. [More]
Digital map of ageing brain could aid diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, other neurodegenerative disorders

Digital map of ageing brain could aid diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, other neurodegenerative disorders

A digital map of the ageing brain could aid the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders in older people, a study suggests. [More]
High-fat, high-sugar diet can cause bacterial changes that appear related to loss of 'cognitive flexibility'

High-fat, high-sugar diet can cause bacterial changes that appear related to loss of 'cognitive flexibility'

A study at Oregon State University indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations. [More]
Drug discovery experts receive £3m to find new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Drug discovery experts receive £3m to find new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Funding worth nearly half a million pounds will unite academics at the University of Southampton with drug discovery experts at the medical research charity MRC Technology, to target the immune system in the hunt for new treatments for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
WSU research provides new strategies for prevention, treatment of obesity

WSU research provides new strategies for prevention, treatment of obesity

Washington State University scientists have shown that berries, grapes and other fruits convert excess white fat into calorie-burning "beige" fat, providing new strategies for the prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Professor Tiago H. Falk receives CMBES Early Career Achievement Award

Professor Tiago H. Falk receives CMBES Early Career Achievement Award

Professor Tiago H. Falk of the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre has received the Canadian Medical and Biological Engineering Society (CMBES) Early Career Achievement Award in recognition of the outstanding scientific contributions the young researcher has made over the past five years. [More]
Discovery provides clue to long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses function

Discovery provides clue to long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses function

A team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has identified the first sensor of the Earth's magnetic field in an animal, finding in the brain of a tiny worm a big clue to a long-held mystery about how animals' internal compasses work. [More]
Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Men with an elevated, genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer could be routinely identified with a simple blood or urine test, scientists at UC San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente Northern California have concluded, potentially paving the way to better or earlier diagnosis. [More]
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