Alzheimer's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Alzheimer's Disease News and Research Twitter

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Basic cell biology research into neurodegeneration may fuel understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Basic cell biology research into neurodegeneration may fuel understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Clinical trials and translational medicine have certainly given people hope and rapid pathways to cures for some of mankind's most troublesome diseases, but now is not the time to overlook the power of basic research, says UC Santa Barbara neuroscientist Kenneth S. Kosik. [More]
Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

Scientists devise new route to synthesize insecticide in 15 steps

For chemists like Sarah Reisman, professor of chemistry at Caltech, synthesizing molecules is like designing your own jigsaw puzzle. You know what the solved puzzle looks like--the molecule--and your job is to figure out the best pieces to use to put it together. [More]
Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes

Stiff arteries can negatively impact memory and vital brain processes

As we age, our arteries gradually become less flexible, making it harder for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. [More]
Western dietary pattern linked to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Western dietary pattern linked to risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer's disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer's disease are rising worldwide. [More]
People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers may have increased risk for stroke

People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the August 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model

Raising brain protein alleviates symptoms of Alzheimer's disease in mouse model

Boosting levels of a specific protein in the brain alleviates hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease in a mouse model of the disorder, according to new research published online August 25, 2016 in Scientific Reports. [More]
Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Avoiding foods high in AGEs could help protect from developing diabetes

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

HMS study reveals key instigator of nerve cell damage in ALS patients

Scientists from Harvard Medical School have identified a key instigator of nerve cell damage in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
Multivariate approach helps improve MMSE test for Alzheimer's disease

Multivariate approach helps improve MMSE test for Alzheimer's disease

Currently, cognitive impairment of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is measured using the 'Mini-Mental State Examination' (MMSE) test, which involves monitoring answers to five types of questions and using an algorithm to score patients. [More]
Novel scaffolds may open new avenues in stem and cancer cell manipulation

Novel scaffolds may open new avenues in stem and cancer cell manipulation

A discovery in the field of biomaterials may open new frontiers in stem and cancer cell manipulation and associated advanced therapy development. [More]
New MRI method detects low zinc levels to help identify healthy prostate tissue from cancer

New MRI method detects low zinc levels to help identify healthy prostate tissue from cancer

A novel MRI method that detects low levels of zinc ion can help distinguish healthy prostate tissue from cancer, UT Southwestern Medical Center radiologists have determined. [More]
Salk researchers identify new mechanism for Alzheimer's risk gene

Salk researchers identify new mechanism for Alzheimer's risk gene

For decades, scientists have known that people with two copies of a gene called apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) are much more likely to have Alzheimer's disease at age 65 than the rest of the population. [More]
MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

Maintaining appropriate levels of proteins within cells largely relies on a cellular component called the proteasome, which degrades unneeded or defective proteins to recycle the components for the eventual assembly of new proteins. [More]
Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer’s

Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer’s

A study by researchers at UCLA's Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior has found that a healthy diet, regular physical activity and a normal body mass index can reduce the incidence of protein build-ups that are associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

There's a reason it's called a gut feeling. The brain and the gut are connected by intricate neural networks that signal hunger and satiety, love and fear, even safety and danger. These networks employ myriad chemical signals that include dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter most famous for its role in reward and addiction. [More]
Commonly used anti-inflammatory drug shows potential to treat Alzheimer's disease

Commonly used anti-inflammatory drug shows potential to treat Alzheimer's disease

A research project has shown that an experimental model of Alzheimer's disease can be successfully treated with a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. [More]
Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
Early treatment of multiple sclerosis may offer long-lasting effect on disease activity

Early treatment of multiple sclerosis may offer long-lasting effect on disease activity

Starting medication for multiple sclerosis (MS) in people who show the beginning signs of the disease is associated with prolonging the time before the disease is definitively diagnosed, according to a long-term study published in the August 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
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