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Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks of daily living. In most people with AD, symptoms first appear after age 60. AD is the most common cause of dementia among older people, but it is not a normal part of aging. Dementia refers to a decline in cognitive function that interferes with daily life and activities. AD starts in a region of the brain that affects recent memory, then gradually spreads to other parts of the brain. Although treatment can slow the progression of AD and help manage its symptoms in some people, currently there is no cure for this devastating disease.
Study shows epilepsy drug can protect vision of MS patients

Study shows epilepsy drug can protect vision of MS patients

A drug commonly taken to prevent seizures in epilepsy may surprisingly protect the eyesight of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

Aspirin use continues to surge among older adults in US

A national survey suggests that slightly more than half of the older adults in the United States are now taking a daily dose of aspirin, even though its use is not recommended by the Food and Drug Administration for most people who have not yet had a heart attack or stroke. [More]
New research links sleep apnea, heavy snoring with premature cognitive decline

New research links sleep apnea, heavy snoring with premature cognitive decline

Heavy snoring and sleep apnea may be linked to memory and thinking decline at an earlier age, according to a new study published in the April 15, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

Autophagy: A new approach to fighting tuberculosis

A new approach to combatting tuberculosis would take advantage of a complex, natural process called autophagy that the human body uses to recycle nutrients, remove damaged cell components, eliminate invading bacteria, and respond to inflammation. [More]
Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Novel findings may hold promise for children, adults with mitochondrial disorders

Rooted in malfunctions in the tiny power plants that energize our cells, mitochondrial disorders are notoriously complex and variable, with few effective treatments. Now, novel findings in microscopic worms may hold great promise for children and adults with mitochondrial disorders [More]
Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai, Arena complete two Phase 1 registrational trials for once-daily formulation of lorcaserin

Eisai Inc. and Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the completion of two Phase 1 registrational clinical trials that Eisai and Arena believe demonstrate bioequivalence of an investigational once-daily extended release formulation of lorcaserin, as compared to the twice-daily immediate release formulation approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and marketed as BELVIQ. [More]
Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers explore influence of low-frequency magnetic fields on neurodegenerative disorders

Researchers explore influence of low-frequency magnetic fields on neurodegenerative disorders

Low-frequency alternating magnetic fields such as those generated by overhead power lines are considered a potential health risk because epidemiological studies indicate that they may aggravate, among other things, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
U-M's Taubman Institute receives $3 million gift to support next generation of medical research

U-M's Taubman Institute receives $3 million gift to support next generation of medical research

A $3 million gift from noted business and philanthropic leaders Leslie and Abigail Wexner will support the next generation of medical research trailblazers at the University of Michigan through grants from the A. Alfred Taubman Medical Research Institute. [More]
A new amyloid-targeting treatment for Alzheimer's disease

A new amyloid-targeting treatment for Alzheimer's disease

With each new amyloid-targeting treatment for Alzheimer's disease that has been developed, there has been a corresponding concern. For example, antibodies targeting amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) produce inflammation in the brain in some patients. [More]

Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

In work that reconciles two competing views of brain structures involved in memory and spatial perception, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conducted experiments that suggest the hippocampus - a small region in the brain's limbic system - is dedicated largely to memory formation and not to spatial skills, such as navigation. [More]
ImmunoClin receives controlled drug license to supply, produce schedule 1 drugs in UK

ImmunoClin receives controlled drug license to supply, produce schedule 1 drugs in UK

ImmunoClin Corporation, a healthcare company specialized in personalized medicine, announces that its wholly owned subsidiary, ImmunoClin Ltd., received a controlled drug license from the UK government to possess, supply and produce schedule 1 drugs in its UK laboratory. [More]
Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

Study suggests possible role for caffeine in AD treatment

The proposed link between caffeine and reductions in the beta amyloid plaque accumulation characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggest a possible role for caffeine in AD treatment. The latest evidence linking beta amyloid protein to Alzheimer's disease and exploring the relationship between caffeine and beta amyloid are featured in a review article in Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Complete review of amyloid-beta protein behind Alzheimer's disease

Complete review of amyloid-beta protein behind Alzheimer's disease

"It will still take many years to understand the mechanisms leading to the formation of the characteristic plaques seen in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease", explains Alessandro Laio, SISSA professor. "We know they are mostly a build-up of amyloid-beta peptide, the protein that research is currently focusing on". And, as of today, all those involved in biomolecular research on Alzheimer's will have access to a new and important instrument: an extensive and complete review of all scientific knowledge about this "killer protein" has in fact just been published in the journal Chemical Reviews. [More]
Study finds link between brain alterations and functional decline in women at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Study finds link between brain alterations and functional decline in women at risk for Alzheimer's disease

In their latest brain imaging study on women at risk for Alzheimer's disease, York University researchers have found deterioration in the pathways that serve to communicate signals between different brain regions needed for performing everyday activities such as driving a car or using a computer. [More]
Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Patient with severe Alzheimer's shows promising benefits during treatment with Bryostatin drug

Researchers at the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute and the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine announced their findings from a new study entitled, "PSEN1 Variant in a Family with Atypical AD." An Alzheimer patient with very severe disease, genetically confirmed to have a known variant of PSEN1, showed promising benefits during treatment with the drug Bryostatin 1. [More]
Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data: It's a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists at Washington University in St. Louis' School of Engineering & Applied Science tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. [More]
Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't. [More]
Discovery opens new drug development avenues for treating multiple diseases

Discovery opens new drug development avenues for treating multiple diseases

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a control switch for the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular stress relief mechanism drawing major scientific interest because of its role in cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disorders and several neural degenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), otherwise known as Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Study: Blood test may help diagnose Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women

Study: Blood test may help diagnose Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women

A blood test may shed new light on Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women, according to a new study published in the March 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Fragile X is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the most frequent genetic cause of autism. [More]
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