Amino Acid News and Research RSS Feed - Amino Acid News and Research

Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
Research findings could pave way for synthesis of biologically active oligopeptides

Research findings could pave way for synthesis of biologically active oligopeptides

The research community and pharmaceutical industry have had a long-standing interest in developing peptide-based therapeutics owing to their high target specificity, potent activity, and small size relative to protein-based biologics. [More]
Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

Auditory deficits in people with schizophrenia linked to dysfunctional brain receptors

The inability to hear subtle changes in pitch, a common and debilitating problem for people with schizophrenia, is due to dysfunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) brain receptors, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers. [More]
Researchers find way to make changes to enzyme-driven assembly line to improve antibiotics

Researchers find way to make changes to enzyme-driven assembly line to improve antibiotics

Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a way to make pinpoint changes to an enzyme-driven "assembly line" that will enable scientists to improve or change the properties of existing antibiotics as well as create designer compounds. [More]
Scientists develop safe, highly efficient method to improve searching of new germicides

Scientists develop safe, highly efficient method to improve searching of new germicides

Scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University in cooperation with colleagues have worked out a safe, not that expensive and highly efficient method, which allows to speed up and improve searching of new germicides. [More]
TUM scientists uncover molecular mechanisms of inhibitors that can selectively thwart immunoproteasome

TUM scientists uncover molecular mechanisms of inhibitors that can selectively thwart immunoproteasome

The immunoproteasome dismantles proteins and the resulting fragments are displayed on the surface of cells. This helps the immune system to recognize abnormal cells. However, in chronic inflammations and autoimmune diseases this “information channel” is overactive. [More]
New self-regulating smart patch releases blood-thinning drugs when necessary

New self-regulating smart patch releases blood-thinning drugs when necessary

An interdisciplinary team of researchers has developed a smart patch designed to monitor a patient's blood and release blood-thinning drugs as needed to prevent the occurrence of dangerous blood clots - a condition known as thrombosis. [More]
Editing preferences of enzymes may play role in infertility and cancer

Editing preferences of enzymes may play role in infertility and cancer

To "turn off" particular regions of genes or protect them from damage, DNA strands can wrap around small proteins, called histones, keeping out all but the most specialized molecular machinery. [More]
Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer

Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer

Cancer rewires the metabolism of tumor cells, converting them into lean, mean, replicating machines. [More]
Food restriction may be potential treatment strategy for certain types of cancers, research suggests

Food restriction may be potential treatment strategy for certain types of cancers, research suggests

Could limiting food intake be a valid treatment strategy for certain types of cancers? New research in The FASEB Journal suggests "maybe." [More]
Rice University scientists uncover new clues to cause of Huntington's disease

Rice University scientists uncover new clues to cause of Huntington's disease

Rice University scientists have uncovered new details about how a repeating nucleotide sequence in the gene for a mutant protein may trigger Huntington's and other neurological diseases. [More]
Elucidating IDP behaviour on crowded membranes

Elucidating IDP behaviour on crowded membranes

IDPs are proteins that contain stretches of amino-acid sequence that are flexible and do not comprise stable structure in isolation. This is in contrast with a more traditional view of proteins as largely occupying a stable native structure that correlates with functions such as enzyme activity or binding. [More]
Researcher develops nature-inspired adhesive that stays sticky when wet

Researcher develops nature-inspired adhesive that stays sticky when wet

Even the strongest glues collapse when soaked. Just watch a band-aid slide ungracefully off a finger or toe while in the shower. However, with support from the Office of Naval Research, one researcher has developed a nature-inspired adhesive that stays sticky when wet. [More]
Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. [More]
TSRI scientists develop useful technique to unmask new functional features of human proteins

TSRI scientists develop useful technique to unmask new functional features of human proteins

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a broadly useful method to unmask new functional features of human proteins. [More]
Benefit and harm of tandem mass spectrometry screening for tyrosinaemia type 1 remain unclear

Benefit and harm of tandem mass spectrometry screening for tyrosinaemia type 1 remain unclear

Tyrosinaemia type 1 is a rare, hereditary metabolic disease that, if left untreated, can already lead to serious liver and kidney damage in infancy. [More]
Breakthrough Award supports research on role of chronic stress in breast cancer development

Breakthrough Award supports research on role of chronic stress in breast cancer development

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey resident research member Wenwei Hu, PhD, has received a $596,250 Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense through its Breast Cancer Research Program to study the role of chronic stress in breast cancer development. [More]
Researchers design small compounds with potential to correct mitochondrial dysfunction

Researchers design small compounds with potential to correct mitochondrial dysfunction

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is an inherited disorder that leads to a gradual loss of motor neurons and, eventually, paralysis. The condition is caused by genetic mutations that disrupts cells' energy factories, called mitochondria. [More]
TSRI scientists discover reason for lack of successful HCV vaccine design

TSRI scientists discover reason for lack of successful HCV vaccine design

Researchers have been trying for decades to develop a vaccine against the globally endemic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Now scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered one reason why success has so far been elusive. [More]
Scientists identify novel strategy to treat pancreatic cancer

Scientists identify novel strategy to treat pancreatic cancer

Researchers have found that a protein called SLC6A14 is overexpressed by several fold in pancreatic tumors taken from patients and in cancerous pancreatic cells lines compared with normal pancreatic tissue or normal pancreatic cells. [More]
Scientists find how selenium gets integrated into protein molecules

Scientists find how selenium gets integrated into protein molecules

Humans need eight essential trace elements for good health, and one of them is selenium - a powerful antioxidant that is important for thyroid and brain function as well as metabolism. [More]
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