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Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
Study reveals new epigenetic mechanism underlying progression of cancer tumors

Study reveals new epigenetic mechanism underlying progression of cancer tumors

Aggressive cancer growth and alterations in gene activity without changes in DNA sequence (epigenetics) are associated with mutant p53 proteins, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

People who eat high protein foods have lower blood pressure and arterial stiffness

Eating foods rich in amino acids could be as good for your heart as stopping smoking or getting more exercise - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Researchers design online database to help researchers identify cancer gene mutations

Many clinical trials use genome sequencing to learn which gene mutations are present in a patient's tumor cells. The question is important because targeting the right mutations with the right drugs can stop cancer in its tracks. But it can be difficult to determine whether there is evidence in the medical literature that particular mutations might drive cancer growth and could be targeted by therapy, and which mutations are of no consequence. [More]
GMP protein can improve gastrointestinal health by protecting digestive system from pathogens

GMP protein can improve gastrointestinal health by protecting digestive system from pathogens

The protein glycomacropeptide (GMP) is derived from whey, the liquid by-product of the cheese-making process. GMP contains low amounts of the amino acid phenylalanine. Individuals who suffer from phenylketonuria—a metabolic disorder that causes cognitive impairment when phenylalanine level is too high—can use GMP as an alternative protein source. GMP supplementation has also been observed to improve gastrointestinal health by protecting the digestive system from pathogens and by having an anti-inflammatory effect. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Intrexon, Synthetic Biologics form ECC to develop and commercialize novel biotherapeutics for phenylketonuria

Intrexon, Synthetic Biologics form ECC to develop and commercialize novel biotherapeutics for phenylketonuria

Intrexon Corporation, a leader in synthetic biology, and Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the microbiome while targeting pathogen-specific diseases, today announced an Exclusive Channel Collaboration (ECC) to pursue the development and commercialization of novel biotherapeutics for the treatment of patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), a serious and debilitating metabolic disorder. [More]
Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Study may lead to effective antimicrobial treatment strategies for people with uncontrolled diabetes

Case Western Reserve scientists may have uncovered a molecular mechanism that sets into motion dangerous infection in the feet and hands often occurring with uncontrolled diabetes. It appears that high blood sugar unleashes destructive molecules that interfere with the body's natural infection-control defenses. [More]
Molecular packaging enhances cancer drug’s effectiveness at destroying tumors

Molecular packaging enhances cancer drug’s effectiveness at destroying tumors

Researchers have packaged a widely used cancer drug into nanoparticles, more than doubling its effectiveness at destroying tumors. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers uncover new mechanism that p53 protein uses to trigger cell death

Researchers have identified a new mechanism that the tumor suppressor protein p53 uses to trigger cell death via apoptosis and have shown how the process could be harnessed to kill cancer cells. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears today in the scientific journal Molecular Cell. [More]
Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Researchers decode molecular mechanism of fish toxin that has potential to treat cancer

Pathogenic bacteria develop killer machines that work very specifically and highly efficiently. Scientists from the University of Freiburg have solved the molecular mechanism of a fish toxin that could be used in the future as a medication to treat cancer. The scientists have now published their research in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
SutroVax completes $22 million Series A financing

SutroVax completes $22 million Series A financing

SutroVax, a recently established biopharmaceutical vaccine company, today announced the completion of a $22 million Series A financing. SutroVax is developing vaccines for infectious disease targets, with an initial emphasis on best-in-class conjugate vaccines, using an exclusive license to Sutro Biopharma's Xpress CF and Xpress CF+ platforms for cell free protein synthesis and site-specific conjugation respectively. [More]
Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

A rare autoimmune disease creates sudden pain in the abdomen or the head, sending a patient to the emergency room with a potentially fatal condition. The pain comes from a multitude of blockages of tiny blood vessels, formed after the patient's own immune system somehow inhibits an enzyme that is vital to control clotting. [More]
Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Growing up in West Virginia, Jill Turner saw firsthand the kind of havoc that drug addiction can wreak. "I had a lot of friends who had very promising lives and promising careers ahead of them," the assistant professor in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy says, "but they ended up either overdosing or going to jail for drug-related stuff. It's one of the reasons I went into drug addiction research." [More]
Heidelberg University scientists gain new insight into cytotoxic effect of Ebola virus

Heidelberg University scientists gain new insight into cytotoxic effect of Ebola virus

In the course of basic research in membrane biochemistry scientists at Heidelberg University have gained new insight into the cytotoxic effect of the Ebola virus. Employing biochemical and cell biological methods they have shed light on the molecular relationships between the Ebola glycoprotein and its role in mediating cytotoxicity. [More]
Abingdon Health seeks distributors for newly launched Seralite - FLC diagnostic device

Abingdon Health seeks distributors for newly launched Seralite - FLC diagnostic device

Following the commercial launch of Seralite - FLC Abingdon Health is looking to appoint distributors in order to enable as many people as possible affected by multiple myeloma (a cancer arising from plasma cells) to have access to, and benefit from its rapid diagnostic capabilities. [More]
Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

Study examines how low-methionine diet may help improve outcomes in triple-negative breast cancer patients

A diet that starves triple-negative breast cancer cells of an essential nutrient primes the cancer cells to be more easily killed by a targeted antibody treatment, UW Carbone Cancer Center scientists report in a recent publication. [More]
New method could help identify 'handedness' of different molecules in mixture

New method could help identify 'handedness' of different molecules in mixture

Scientists have demonstrated for the first time the ability to rapidly, reliably and simultaneously identify the 'handedness' of different molecules in a mixture. [More]
Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a mother's vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers. [More]
New research could help reverse side effects of acetaminophen overdose

New research could help reverse side effects of acetaminophen overdose

New research could help reverse deadly side effects caused by excessive doses of the drug acetaminophen, the major ingredient in Tylenol and many other over-the-counter and prescription medicines. [More]
Finding may pave way for much-needed treatments for people with epilepsy

Finding may pave way for much-needed treatments for people with epilepsy

An amino acid whose role in the body has been all but a mystery appears to act as a potent seizure inhibitor in mice, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins. [More]
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