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Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
SAFit-ligands provide foundation for novel treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders

SAFit-ligands provide foundation for novel treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders

The FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51) is an established risk factor for stress-related psychiatric disorders such as major depression. Drug discovery for FKBP51 has been hampered by the inability to pharmacologically differentiate against the very similar functional counterplayer FKBP52. [More]
GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

GABA injections prevent and reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice

A chemical produced in the pancreas that prevented and even reversed Type 1 diabetes in mice had the same effect on human beta cells transplanted into mice, new research has found. [More]
TSRI study examines body’s own response against chronic protein misfolding

TSRI study examines body’s own response against chronic protein misfolding

“Protein misfolding” diseases such as cystic fibrosis and Alzheimer’s may be seriously exacerbated by the body’s own response against that misfolding, according to a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. [More]
Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]
Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Single mutation in beta-catenin gene can lead to infertility

Scientists from the RIKEN BioResource Center in Tsukuba, Japan, have discovered that a single mutation in the beta-catenin gene, which codes a protein known to be deeply involved in a number of developmental and homeostatic processes, can lead to infertility not through a disruption of the production of egg or sperm cells, but rather by leading to abnormalities in the morphology of the sexual organs, making natural reproduction impossible. [More]
Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

Researchers find potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a potential target for therapies to treat cocaine addiction. [More]
Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Intake of arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes

Associated with various types of cancer such as skin and liver, the intake of arsenic it is also linked to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. According to a long-term research conducted by experts from the Center for Research and Advanced Studies it was determined that this metalloid inhibits enzymes associated with antioxidant protection. [More]
Proteins linked to severe forms of ALS are less stable, suggests new study

Proteins linked to severe forms of ALS are less stable, suggests new study

A new study by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and other institutions suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. [More]
Researchers discover mitochondrial and nuclear tRNA-lookalikes in human genome

Researchers discover mitochondrial and nuclear tRNA-lookalikes in human genome

Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are ancient workhorse molecules and part of the cellular process that creates the proteins, critical building blocks of life that keep a cell running smoothly. [More]
MicroRNA molecule plays crucial role in managing cell survival and growth

MicroRNA molecule plays crucial role in managing cell survival and growth

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a microRNA molecule as a surprisingly crucial player in managing cell survival and growth. [More]
Overcoming chromatography separation challenges: an interview with Dr. Michael Bavand, ChromaCon, and Dr. Markus Fuchs, Knauer

Overcoming chromatography separation challenges: an interview with Dr. Michael Bavand, ChromaCon, and Dr. Markus Fuchs, Knauer

The biggest challenge in process-scale batch chromatography is how to optimize the yield and throughput at a desired purity. With high target purity in pharmaceuticals and reasonable throughput, yield is usually low and therefore chromatography is considered an expensive high-resolution separation method. [More]
TyrRS enzyme protects DNA during cellular stress

TyrRS enzyme protects DNA during cellular stress

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have found that an enzyme best known for its fundamental role in building proteins has a second major function: to protect DNA during times of cellular stress. [More]
Leicester scientists lend a helping hand in fight against Alzheimer's and cancer

Leicester scientists lend a helping hand in fight against Alzheimer's and cancer

Chemists at the University of Leicester have reported a breakthrough in techniques to develop new drugs in the fight against diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's. [More]
Newborn screening can prevent lifelong disability

Newborn screening can prevent lifelong disability

When your baby was born you likely heard a loud cry and examined your baby to make sure he/she had a full set of adorable fingers and toes. But just imagine a few days after you arrive home, your phone rings: your baby has screened positive for a genetic disorder. [More]
Epidurals and reduced postpartum depression: an interview with Dr. Zakowski

Epidurals and reduced postpartum depression: an interview with Dr. Zakowski

The “maternity blues”, which resolve within 10 days of giving birth, occurs in up to 80% of new moms. A major depressive episode, by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria, is defined as having at least a 2-week period of persistent depressed mood ... [More]
TSRI scientists devise new vancomycin-based antibiotic to rout resistant bacteria

TSRI scientists devise new vancomycin-based antibiotic to rout resistant bacteria

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised a new antibiotic based on vancomycin that is powerfully effective against vancomycin-resistant strains of MRSA and other disease-causing bacteria. [More]
Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim's insulin glargine product gets marketing approval from EC

Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim's insulin glargine product gets marketing approval from EC

The European Commission granted marketing authorisation for Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim's insulin glargine product, indicated to treat diabetes in adults, adolescents and children aged 2 years and above. [More]
Cholera against cholera: an interview with Dr Bruce Turnbull, University of Leeds

Cholera against cholera: an interview with Dr Bruce Turnbull, University of Leeds

Cholera bacteria, and other types of bacteria that cause diarrheal diseases, infect your intestines where they release AB5 protein toxins – that is they have a single toxic A-subunit that is linked to a pentamer of B-subunits that act as the delivery vehicle to transport the A-subunit into the cells. [More]
Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish "disease in a dish" models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer's disease to diabetes. [More]
Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Many patients suffer from severe spinal cord injuries after being involved in traffic accidents or accidents at work. [More]