Amino Acid News and Research RSS Feed - Amino Acid News and Research

Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer

Blocking key nutrient uptake may be effective way of treating triple negative breast cancer

Cancer rewires the metabolism of tumor cells, converting them into lean, mean, replicating machines. [More]
Food restriction may be potential treatment strategy for certain types of cancers, research suggests

Food restriction may be potential treatment strategy for certain types of cancers, research suggests

Could limiting food intake be a valid treatment strategy for certain types of cancers? New research in The FASEB Journal suggests "maybe." [More]
Rice University scientists uncover new clues to cause of Huntington's disease

Rice University scientists uncover new clues to cause of Huntington's disease

Rice University scientists have uncovered new details about how a repeating nucleotide sequence in the gene for a mutant protein may trigger Huntington's and other neurological diseases. [More]
Elucidating IDP behaviour on crowded membranes

Elucidating IDP behaviour on crowded membranes

IDPs are proteins that contain stretches of amino-acid sequence that are flexible and do not comprise stable structure in isolation. This is in contrast with a more traditional view of proteins as largely occupying a stable native structure that correlates with functions such as enzyme activity or binding. [More]
Researcher develops nature-inspired adhesive that stays sticky when wet

Researcher develops nature-inspired adhesive that stays sticky when wet

Even the strongest glues collapse when soaked. Just watch a band-aid slide ungracefully off a finger or toe while in the shower. However, with support from the Office of Naval Research, one researcher has developed a nature-inspired adhesive that stays sticky when wet. [More]
Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics may combat bacteria differently than previously thought

Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. [More]
TSRI scientists develop useful technique to unmask new functional features of human proteins

TSRI scientists develop useful technique to unmask new functional features of human proteins

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a broadly useful method to unmask new functional features of human proteins. [More]
Benefit and harm of tandem mass spectrometry screening for tyrosinaemia type 1 remain unclear

Benefit and harm of tandem mass spectrometry screening for tyrosinaemia type 1 remain unclear

Tyrosinaemia type 1 is a rare, hereditary metabolic disease that, if left untreated, can already lead to serious liver and kidney damage in infancy. [More]
Breakthrough Award supports research on role of chronic stress in breast cancer development

Breakthrough Award supports research on role of chronic stress in breast cancer development

Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey resident research member Wenwei Hu, PhD, has received a $596,250 Breakthrough Award from the U.S. Department of Defense through its Breast Cancer Research Program to study the role of chronic stress in breast cancer development. [More]
Researchers design small compounds with potential to correct mitochondrial dysfunction

Researchers design small compounds with potential to correct mitochondrial dysfunction

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is an inherited disorder that leads to a gradual loss of motor neurons and, eventually, paralysis. The condition is caused by genetic mutations that disrupts cells' energy factories, called mitochondria. [More]
TSRI scientists discover reason for lack of successful HCV vaccine design

TSRI scientists discover reason for lack of successful HCV vaccine design

Researchers have been trying for decades to develop a vaccine against the globally endemic hepatitis C virus (HCV). Now scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered one reason why success has so far been elusive. [More]
Scientists identify novel strategy to treat pancreatic cancer

Scientists identify novel strategy to treat pancreatic cancer

Researchers have found that a protein called SLC6A14 is overexpressed by several fold in pancreatic tumors taken from patients and in cancerous pancreatic cells lines compared with normal pancreatic tissue or normal pancreatic cells. [More]
Scientists find how selenium gets integrated into protein molecules

Scientists find how selenium gets integrated into protein molecules

Humans need eight essential trace elements for good health, and one of them is selenium - a powerful antioxidant that is important for thyroid and brain function as well as metabolism. [More]
Study finds decreased cysteine/cystine ratio could serve as accurate redox biomarker for epilepsy

Study finds decreased cysteine/cystine ratio could serve as accurate redox biomarker for epilepsy

Approximately 2.9 million people in the United States suffer from epilepsy, according to the CDC. [More]
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

CIRM approves $5.2 million for research on life-long treatment for rare childhood disease

Cystinosis is a rare disease that usually strikes children before they are two years old and can lead to end stage kidney failure before their tenth birthday. [More]
KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers

KIT researchers use high-resolution microscopy to uncover how scavenger cells repair muscle fibers

Everybody knows the burning sensation in the legs when climbing down a steep slope for a long time. It is caused by microruptures in the cell membrane of our muscle fibers. [More]
Researchers reveal presence of toxic protein aggregates in the human brain

Researchers reveal presence of toxic protein aggregates in the human brain

The following factors facilitate the formation of putatively toxic structures in the neuronal nuclei of Alzheimer's patients. [More]
Mood stabilizers may decrease negative symptoms in psychiatric patients with specific genotype

Mood stabilizers may decrease negative symptoms in psychiatric patients with specific genotype

A drug prescribed to many patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder may decrease negative symptoms for people with a certain variant of the COMT gene, suggests a new study from researchers at Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
Oral antidiabetic drug modulates the body's nitrogen and urea metabolism

Oral antidiabetic drug modulates the body's nitrogen and urea metabolism

The most frequently prescribed oral antidiabetic drug metformin significantly affects metabolic pathways. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement