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Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Some three billion base pairs make up the human genome-the floor plan of life. In 2003, the Human Genome Project announced the successful decryption of this code, a tour de force that continues to supply a stream of insights relevant to human health and disease. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
New gene-editing system holds potential for treating many genetic disorders

New gene-editing system holds potential for treating many genetic disorders

Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder caused by a single genetic mutation. [More]
Johns Hopkins neuroscientists identify cause of brain degeneration in Huntington's disease

Johns Hopkins neuroscientists identify cause of brain degeneration in Huntington's disease

Working with genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington's disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that regulates the body's immune response to CMV

Infectious disease specialists at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center have identified a protein that regulates the body's immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV), a common pathogen that causes lifelong infections and can lead to devastating illness in newborns and those with weakened immune systems. [More]
CSP analogues may attenuate S. pneumoniae virulence, resistance

CSP analogues may attenuate S. pneumoniae virulence, resistance

The spread of virulent, antibiotic-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae may be controllable through the use of competence-stimulating peptide analogues, US researchers believe. [More]
Scientists produce antibiotic whose biological activity can be controlled with light

Scientists produce antibiotic whose biological activity can be controlled with light

Scientists of the KIT and the University of Kiev have produced an antibiotic, whose biological activity can be controlled with light. Thanks to the robust diarylethene photoswitch, the antimicrobial effect of the peptide mimetic can be applied in a spatially and temporally specific manner. [More]
Chemical engineers design way to manufacture peptides in mere hours

Chemical engineers design way to manufacture peptides in mere hours

Small protein fragments, also called peptides, are promising as drugs because they can be designed for very specific functions inside living cells. Insulin and the HIV drug Fuzeon are some of the earliest successful examples, and peptide drugs are expected to become a $25 billion market by 2018. [More]
Igenica Biotherapeutics doses first patient in Phase 1 clinical trial of IGN523 in patients with AML

Igenica Biotherapeutics doses first patient in Phase 1 clinical trial of IGN523 in patients with AML

Igenica Biotherapeutics, a company focused on the discovery and development of innovative antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) for the treatment of cancer, announced today that the first patient has been dosed in a Phase 1 clinical trial of IGN523 in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Rice University technique able to analyze conformations of complex molecular machines

Rice University technique able to analyze conformations of complex molecular machines

Open, feed, cut. Such is the humdrum life of a motor molecule, the subject of new research at Rice University, that eats and excretes damaged proteins and turns them into harmless peptides for disposal. [More]
Hemp flour with decaffeinated green tea leaves could be used to develop gluten-free snack cracker

Hemp flour with decaffeinated green tea leaves could be used to develop gluten-free snack cracker

The market for gluten-free foods with functional properties is growing immensely across virtually all food categories on a global level. The need to replace wheat proteins, fibers, and minerals is very important in order to provide a better selection and more nutritious food for consumers that belong to this segment of the population. [More]
FDA grants Fast Track designation to Edison’s lead drug EPI-743

FDA grants Fast Track designation to Edison’s lead drug EPI-743

Edison Pharmaceuticals today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration granted Fast Track designation to EPI-743, the company's lead drug, for the treatment of Friedreich's ataxia. EPI-743 is being developed for pediatric and adult mitochondrial disease, including Friedreich's ataxia. [More]
New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

"I routinely call hospitals and request their yearly antibiotic susceptibility testing data," said Washington University in St. Louis' Timothy Wencewicz. "The log might say, for example, that they've treated hundreds of patients for Acinetobacter baumanni, a bacterium brought into U.S. hospitals by soldiers wounded in the Iraq war, with 30 different antibiotics. [More]
Researchers discover new target for human antibodies that holds key to vaccine for dengue

Researchers discover new target for human antibodies that holds key to vaccine for dengue

​Creating a vaccine that protects people from all four types of dengue virus has frustrated scientists for decades. But researchers at the University of North Carolina have discovered a new target for human antibodies that could hold the key to a vaccine for the world's most widespread mosquito-borne disease. [More]
Study demonstrates impact of vitamin D on social behavior linked with ASD

Study demonstrates impact of vitamin D on social behavior linked with ASD

A new study by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI) demonstrates the impact that Vitamin D may have on social behavior associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). [More]

Biochrom launches EZ Nin Reagent for use in ion exchange chromatography systems

Biochrom Ltd, a manufacturer of quality scientific instruments for applications in the life science, clinical, and analytical markets, announced today the commercial launch of its EZ Nin ReagentTM, a ready-to-use ninhydrin formulation for use in ion exchange chromatography systems with post-column derivatisation for improved amino acid analysis. [More]
Women who drink alcohol during early stages of pregnancy might affect development of placenta

Women who drink alcohol during early stages of pregnancy might affect development of placenta

Women who drink alcohol at moderate or heavy levels in the early stages of their pregnancy might damage the growth and function of their placenta - the organ responsible for supplying everything that a developing infant needs until birth - research at The University of Manchester shows. [More]
Research findings have important implications for personalized treatment of alcohol abuse

Research findings have important implications for personalized treatment of alcohol abuse

Heavy drinking is common in the United States and takes a personal and societal toll, with an annual estimated cost of $223.5 billion due to losses in workplace productivity, health care and criminal justice expenses. [More]
Topiramate reduces drinking in patients committed to abstinence from alcohol

Topiramate reduces drinking in patients committed to abstinence from alcohol

Heavy drinking alcohol consumption is common in the United States and takes a personal and societal toll, with an annual estimated cost of $223.5 billion due to losses in workplace productivity, and health care and criminal justice expenses. [More]