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Amino Acid is one of several molecules that join together to form proteins. There are 20 common amino acids found in proteins.
Researchers discover how metal beryllium triggers deadly immune response in the lungs

Researchers discover how metal beryllium triggers deadly immune response in the lungs

Using exquisitely detailed maps of molecular shapes and the electrical charges surrounding them, researchers at National Jewish Health have discovered how the metal beryllium triggers a deadly immune response in the lungs. [More]
Scientists report first successful step toward vaccine that targets mutation in brain cancer

Scientists report first successful step toward vaccine that targets mutation in brain cancer

Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are subtypes of a brain cancer called 'glioma'. These incurable brain tumors arise from glial cells, a type of support cell found in the central nervous system. [More]
University of Maryland School of Medicine receives NIH grant to establish neuroscience research center

University of Maryland School of Medicine receives NIH grant to establish neuroscience research center

The University of Maryland School of Medicine's Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, a research center in the School's Department of Psychiatry, was awarded a $10.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a Silvio O. Conte Neuroscience Research Center that will examine the causes of schizophrenia and search for possible new treatments. [More]
Failing dopamine pump damages brain cells of patients with Parkinson's disease

Failing dopamine pump damages brain cells of patients with Parkinson's disease

A study group at the Medical University of Vienna's Centre for Brain Research has investigated the function of an intracellular dopamine pump in Parkinson's patients compared to a healthy test group. [More]
Progress in constructing protein nanomachines

Progress in constructing protein nanomachines

A route for constructing protein nanomachines engineered for specific applications may be closer to reality. [More]
New research shows how misfolded proteins are precisely selected for degradation

New research shows how misfolded proteins are precisely selected for degradation

It's almost axiomatic that misfolded proteins compromise how cells normally function and cause debilitating human disease, but how these proteins are detected and degraded within the body is not well understood. [More]
New approach could lead to more effective HIV vaccine

New approach could lead to more effective HIV vaccine

Using a genetically modified form of the HIV virus, a team of University of Nebraska-Lincoln scientists has developed a promising new approach that could someday lead to a more effective HIV vaccine. [More]
GSA announce winners of GSA Poster Awards at 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

GSA announce winners of GSA Poster Awards at 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) and the Drosophila research community are pleased to announce the winners of GSA Poster Awards at the 55th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, which took place in San Diego, March 26-30, 2014. [More]
USPTO grants two additional patents to SeroVital-hgh formula

USPTO grants two additional patents to SeroVital-hgh formula

SeroVital®-hgh, the "Fountain of Youth" Formula everyone's talking about, has been making headlines ever since a group of some of the most renowned researchers in the world revealed that this oral compound is actually capable of increasing mean, endogenous, serum (blood) human growth hormone (hGH) levels by 682%. Experts everywhere — from dermatologists and obesity researchers to women's healthcare providers and even the famed Dr. Oz himself — began paying attention to this groundbreaking formula. [More]
Shark antibodies reveal evolutionary principles of immunoglobulins

Shark antibodies reveal evolutionary principles of immunoglobulins

Custom-tailored antibodies are regarded as promising weapons against a multitude of serious illnesses. Since they can accurately recognize specific structures on the surface of viruses, bacteria or cancer cells, they are already being deployed successfully in cancer diagnostics and therapy, as well as against numerous other diseases. The stability of the sensitive antibodies is a decisive factor in every step, from production and storage to therapeutic application. [More]
Study reveals how ovarian cancer metabolism changes between early, late stages

Study reveals how ovarian cancer metabolism changes between early, late stages

A Rice University-led analysis of the metabolic profiles of hundreds of ovarian tumors has revealed a new test to determine whether ovarian cancer cells have the potential to metastasize, or spread to other parts of the body. The study also suggests how ovarian cancer treatments can be tailored based on the metabolic profile of a particular tumor. [More]
Scientists receive $2.3M grant to develop new technology to diagnose cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and colitis

Scientists receive $2.3M grant to develop new technology to diagnose cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and colitis

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been awarded a $2.3 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to develop new technology to diagnose cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and colitis. [More]
Blend of soy-dairy proteins may prolong muscle building after resistance exercise, says study

Blend of soy-dairy proteins may prolong muscle building after resistance exercise, says study

A new study published online in the Journal of Applied Physiology shows additional benefits of consuming a blend of soy and dairy proteins after resistance exercise for building muscle mass. [More]
MSU research pushes promising molecule toward clinical trials for treatment of neurological disorders

MSU research pushes promising molecule toward clinical trials for treatment of neurological disorders

The most effective way to tackle debilitating diseases is to punch them at the start and keep them from growing. [More]
Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma, today announced the completion of an agreement between Analytical Testing Laboratories (ATL), a Lebanon based company that specializes in drug testing services and inborn errors of metabolism, for the exclusive distribution of the company's amino acid based products to physicians and pharmacies throughout the Middle East. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Some three billion base pairs make up the human genome-the floor plan of life. In 2003, the Human Genome Project announced the successful decryption of this code, a tour de force that continues to supply a stream of insights relevant to human health and disease. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
New gene-editing system holds potential for treating many genetic disorders

New gene-editing system holds potential for treating many genetic disorders

Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder caused by a single genetic mutation. [More]
Johns Hopkins neuroscientists identify cause of brain degeneration in Huntington's disease

Johns Hopkins neuroscientists identify cause of brain degeneration in Huntington's disease

Working with genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington's disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine. [More]