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GW scientist awarded $2.8 million NIH grant to continue research on corneal wound healing

GW scientist awarded $2.8 million NIH grant to continue research on corneal wound healing

George Washington University researcher Mary Ann Stepp, Ph.D., received a $2.8 million, five-year R01 grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue her 27 years of research on corneal wound healing. [More]
Scientists find way to predict weight loss success based on the brain volume

Scientists find way to predict weight loss success based on the brain volume

If you're trying to lose weight, what are your chances of success? Your brain may hold the key. [More]
University of Limerick professor identifies mesentery as one continuous structure

University of Limerick professor identifies mesentery as one continuous structure

A University of Limerick professor has identified an emerging area of science having reclassified part of the digestive system as an organ. [More]
Allen Institute for Brain Science maps the mouse cortex in 3-D

Allen Institute for Brain Science maps the mouse cortex in 3-D

The Allen Institute for Brain Science has completed the three-dimensional mapping of the mouse cortex as part of the Allen Mouse Common Coordinate Framework (CCF): a standardized spatial coordinate system for comparing many types of data on the brain from the suite of Allen Brain Atlas resources. [More]
K2M announces U.S. launch of innovative 3D-printed CASCADIA product portfolio at 2016 NASS meeting

K2M announces U.S. launch of innovative 3D-printed CASCADIA product portfolio at 2016 NASS meeting

K2M Group Holdings, Inc., a global medical device company focused on designing, developing and commercializing innovative and proprietary complex spine and minimally invasive spine technologies and techniques, today announced the U.S. launch of its award-winning CASCADIA Interbody Systems, featuring Lamellar 3D Titanium Technology, during the 31st North American Spine Society (NASS) Annual Meeting, Oct. 26-29, 2016, in Boston at Booth #1615. [More]
Scientists find way to produce realistic sensations of touch in human amputees

Scientists find way to produce realistic sensations of touch in human amputees

Scientists at the University of Chicago and Case Western Reserve University have found a way to produce realistic sensations of touch in two human amputees by directly stimulating the nervous system. [More]
Pelican Feminine Healthcare to exhibit latest technologies at MEDICA 2016

Pelican Feminine Healthcare to exhibit latest technologies at MEDICA 2016

A leading UK manufacturer of single-use medical devices for women’s health, Pelican Feminine Healthcare will be showcasing the latest technologies at MEDICA 2016. [More]
Scientists discover new receptors for stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori

Scientists discover new receptors for stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori

A research group led by Prof. Markus Gerhard of the Technical University of Munich and Assistant Professor Dr. Bernhard B. Singer of the Institute for Anatomy at the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Duisburg-Essen at Essen University Medical Centre has discovered a completely new approach to preventing or treating infections with this bacterium as well as secondary complications. [More]
How could emerging technologies impact cancer care?

How could emerging technologies impact cancer care?

The major innovations in cancer diagnosis, therapy/palliative care and surgical intervention are too numerous to list here. But enormous strides have taken place in stem cell therapy, monoclonal antibody therapy and genetic screening. [More]
Predominance of testosterone in males may explain sex difference in ACL injury rates

Predominance of testosterone in males may explain sex difference in ACL injury rates

In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees. [More]
Researchers to explore potential roles of tumor-suppressor gene in kidney cancer

Researchers to explore potential roles of tumor-suppressor gene in kidney cancer

Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer, and African-Americans and males appear most at risk for this disease that can be asymptomatic until it has spread and become highly lethal, said Dr. Vinata B. Lokeshwar, cancer researcher and chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Study offers promise for therapeutic management of fetal and congenital genetic diseases in utero

Study offers promise for therapeutic management of fetal and congenital genetic diseases in utero

A breakthrough study by research teams at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science and Oregon Health & Science University offers promise for therapeutic management of congenital diseases in utero using designer nucleotide sequences that can simply be injected into the fluid surrounding the developing fetus to potentially treat disabling-to-lethal genetic defects. [More]
Patient education involving use of multiple senses improves understanding of anticipated care

Patient education involving use of multiple senses improves understanding of anticipated care

Patient education involving the use of multiple senses (sight, hearing and touch) during a physician-patient conversation about treatment, also known as "informed consent," improves understanding of anticipated care and possible outcomes, according to a new study appearing in today's issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. [More]
NCCN publishes new resources to help patients understand treatment options for stomach cancer

NCCN publishes new resources to help patients understand treatment options for stomach cancer

This year, it is estimated that more than 26,000 people will be diagnosed with Stomach Cancer in the United States, with nearly one million new cases diagnosed worldwide each year. [More]
Non-contrast MRA can be viable diagnostic alternative for patients with chronic kidney disease

Non-contrast MRA can be viable diagnostic alternative for patients with chronic kidney disease

Patients with diabetes or renal failure are at high risk for deadly and debilitating vascular diseases, however, the most common imaging tool to evaluate the blood vessels uses a contrast agent that can further damage the kidneys. [More]
Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal lenses: the best chance of true spectacle independence?

Trifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) represent the latest in premium lens technology. They are tiny, artificial lenses that are implanted into the eye during a cataract or lens replacement procedure. [More]
Training during first two weeks of menstrual cycle can have more effect on muscular strength

Training during first two weeks of menstrual cycle can have more effect on muscular strength

Research at Umeå University provides new insights into when during the menstrual cycle it is advantageous to periodise your strength training. [More]
Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women

Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women

In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees. [More]
Orlando Health to bring benefits of MRI-guided radiation therapy to Central Florida

Orlando Health to bring benefits of MRI-guided radiation therapy to Central Florida

Orlando Health will soon begin providing a new therapy that allows oncologists to see the tumor they are treating continuously during radiation therapy. [More]
Revolutionary new scanning technique creates 3D images of bones with unparalleled resolution

Revolutionary new scanning technique creates 3D images of bones with unparalleled resolution

Chemists from Trinity College Dublin in collaboration with RCSI have devised a revolutionary new scanning technique that produces extremely high-res 3D images of bones -- without exposing patients to X-ray radiation. [More]
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