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Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

Poverty has detrimental effects on child's brain development

An alarming 22 percent of U.S. children live in poverty, which can have long-lasting negative consequences on brain development, emotional health and academic achievement. A new study, published July 20 in JAMA Pediatrics, provides even more compelling evidence that growing up in poverty has detrimental effects on the brain. [More]
Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

Binghamton University researchers creating 3-D printing process to help treat incurable diseases

A team of Binghamton University researchers are creating a 3-D printing process to build implantable tissues and organs to treat otherwise incurable diseases. [More]
New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

Cannabis -- marijuana, hashish -- was used as a go-to medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. But the therapeutic use of marijuana was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to a growing awareness of the dangers of addiction. The significant medical benefits of marijuana in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's, cancer, and multiple sclerosis have only recently been reinvestigated. [More]
Gene therapy provides life-long protection to photoreceptor cells in animal model of retinitis pigmentosa

Gene therapy provides life-long protection to photoreceptor cells in animal model of retinitis pigmentosa

A collaboration between scientists in the UK and the USA has shown that gene therapy can give life-long protection to the light-sensitive photoreceptor cells responsible for colour vision in a mouse model of the most common inherited eye disorder. [More]
Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Transplanted MSCs slow progression of lupus nephritis by suppressing Tfh cells in SLE animal model

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that produces autoantibodies and subsequent immune reactions that can lead to a variety of symptoms, including inflammation of the kidneys, or nephritis. When researchers transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow into mice modeled with SLE, they found that inflammation was reduced and nephritis "attenuated." [More]
ReWalk Robotics unveils latest edition of Personal powered exoskeleton system

ReWalk Robotics unveils latest edition of Personal powered exoskeleton system

ReWalk Robotics Ltd., the leading global exoskeleton manufacturer, unveiled today the latest edition of its Personal powered exoskeleton system—the ReWalk Personal 6.0—marking the company's sixth generation community use product. The ReWalk Personal 6.0 offers those in the spinal cord injured community the most functional exoskeleton system with the fastest walking speed and the most precise fit, among many other key benefits. [More]
Smith & Nephew to distribute Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew to distribute Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew plc, the global medical technology business, today announces a partnership with ScopisGmbH, the German developer and manufacturer of surgical navigation systems, as the exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium from 1 July. [More]
Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the School of Medicine have found that the three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex - the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation - strongly correlates with ancestral background. [More]
Edwards Lifesciences agrees to acquire CardiAQ Valve Technologies

Edwards Lifesciences agrees to acquire CardiAQ Valve Technologies

Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, the global leader in the science of heart valves and hemodynamic monitoring, today announced that it has agreed to acquire CardiAQ Valve Technologies, Inc., a privately held company and developer of a transcatheter mitral valve replacement system. [More]
Smith & Nephew becomes exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS system in UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew becomes exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS system in UK, Ireland and Belgium

Smith & Nephew plc, the global medical technology business, today announces a partnership with ScopisGmbH, the German developer and manufacturer of surgical navigation systems, as the exclusive distributor of Scopis TGS Target Guided Surgery system in the UK, Ireland and Belgium from 1 July. [More]
UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

Light switches for neurons have made enormous contributions to brain research by giving investigators access to "on switches" for brain cells. But, finding "off switches" has been much more challenging. [More]
UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

UCLA cardiologists use less invasive approach to replace heart valve

Last summer, after a long career as a successful entrepreneur and a brief retirement, Richard Whitaker was helping to start another new company. Unfortunately, a serious health concern caused a couple of interruptions in his work on the new venture. One of Whitaker's heart valves wasn't working properly, which caused congestive heart failure and led to two hospitalizations within several months. [More]
Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

While there is good understanding of how bone mass, and more recently bone architecture, affects fracture risk, far less is known about the material properties of bone, or how these can impart resilience or fragility to the skeleton. [More]
FDA Grants clearance to MXO's dynaMX Compression Staple featuring Malleable Nitinol Technology

FDA Grants clearance to MXO's dynaMX Compression Staple featuring Malleable Nitinol Technology

MX Orthopedics, Corp., a leader in superelastic technologies for orthopedic implants, announces the recent FDA clearance (K143622) of its patent-pending dynaMX™ Compression Staple featuring Malleable Nitinol Technology. [More]
Kay E. Davies named recipient of ASHG's 2015 William Allan Award

Kay E. Davies named recipient of ASHG's 2015 William Allan Award

The American Society of Human Genetics has named Kay E. Davies, DPhil, Dr. Lee's professor of anatomy, associate head of the medical sciences division; and director of the Medical Research Council Functional Genomics Unit in the department of physiology, anatomy and genetics at the University of Oxford, the 2015 recipient of the annual William Allan Award. [More]
Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Helen DeVos Children's Hospital uses two imaging techniques to produce hybrid 3D model of a patient's heart

Congenital heart experts from Spectrum Health Helen DeVos Children's Hospital have successfully integrated two common imaging techniques to produce a three-dimensional anatomic model of a patient's heart. [More]
Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles are providing new hope for babies with short bowel syndrome (SBS) by developing a novel model of SBS in zebrafish, described in a paper published online on June 18 by the American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. [More]
Research finding could help develop artificial retinas for people with vision loss

Research finding could help develop artificial retinas for people with vision loss

Driving a car at 40 mph, you see a child dart into the street. You hit the brakes. Disaster averted. But how did your eyes detect that movement? It's a question that has confounded scientists. Now, studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have an answer: A neural circuit in the retina at the back of the eye carries signals that enable the eye to detect movement. [More]
Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

A U.S. patent has been awarded to a Kansas State University technology that quickly detects the early stages of cancer before physical symptoms ever appear. [More]
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