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Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

Preclinical Magnetic Particle Imaging: an interview with Professor Jeff Bulte, Johns Hopkins

I'm Jeff Bulte, professor of Radiology and Director of Cellular Imaging at the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland in the United States. I lead a group of about 20 to 25 people who focus their research on imaging cells. [More]
CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

CHLA researchers provide new hope for infants with short bowel syndrome

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles are providing new hope for babies with short bowel syndrome (SBS) by developing a novel model of SBS in zebrafish, described in a paper published online on June 18 by the American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. [More]
Research finding could help develop artificial retinas for people with vision loss

Research finding could help develop artificial retinas for people with vision loss

Driving a car at 40 mph, you see a child dart into the street. You hit the brakes. Disaster averted. But how did your eyes detect that movement? It's a question that has confounded scientists. Now, studying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have an answer: A neural circuit in the retina at the back of the eye carries signals that enable the eye to detect movement. [More]
Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

Nanoplatform technology that detects early stages of cancer receives U.S. patent

A U.S. patent has been awarded to a Kansas State University technology that quickly detects the early stages of cancer before physical symptoms ever appear. [More]
Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

One mouse with weak bones appears to have a strong metabolism, even on a high-fat diet, scientists report. While weaker bones are clearly not a good thing, scientists suspect that, somewhere in the conversation between the genetically engineered mouse's skeleton and the rest of its body, there may be an answer that helps obese individuals avoid some of the worst ravages of this health epidemic. [More]
Researchers find lymphatic vessels in the central nervous system

Researchers find lymphatic vessels in the central nervous system

In a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers working at the Wihuri Research Institute and the University of Helsinki report a surprising finding that challenges current anatomy and histology textbook knowledge: Lymphatic vessels are found in the central nervous system where they were not known to exist. [More]
Philips introduces new Anatomically Intelligent Ultrasound tool

Philips introduces new Anatomically Intelligent Ultrasound tool

Royal Philips today announced the introduction of HeartModelA.I., a new Anatomically Intelligent Ultrasound (AIUS) tool that brings advanced quantification, automated 3D views and robust reproducibility to cardiac ultrasound imaging. [More]
Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

On Friday, May 22, an 18-member team of physicians and nurses from Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led an international collaboration to separate a pair of six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins, the first such operation ever performed on Haitian soil. [More]
Duke Medicine scientists produce 3-D map of human brain stem using MRI technology

Duke Medicine scientists produce 3-D map of human brain stem using MRI technology

Scientists at Duke Medicine have produced a 3-D map of the human brain stem at an unprecedented level of detail using MRI technology. [More]

Research findings challenge the model of memory forming in hippocampus

The hippocampus plays a crucial role in memory formation. However, it is not yet fully understood in what way that brain structure's individual regions are involved in the formation of memories. Neuroscientists at the Collaborative Research Center 874 at RUB have recreated this process with the aid of computer simulations. [More]
Zinc levels linked to formation of kidney stone

Zinc levels linked to formation of kidney stone

New research on kidney stone formation reveals that zinc levels may contribute to kidney stone formation, a common urinary condition that can cause excruciating pain. The research found that zinc may be the core by which stone formation starts. [More]
Centinel Spine achieves milestone implantation of 20,000 STALIF C cervical integrated interbody devices

Centinel Spine achieves milestone implantation of 20,000 STALIF C cervical integrated interbody devices

Centinel Spine, Inc., the pioneer of spinal Stand-Alone, No-Profile®, Integrated Interbody™ devices has now implanted 20,000 STALIF C cervical Integrated Interbody devices. The STALF C device is implanted during cervical fusion procedures to treat degenerative spinal disorders. [More]
Innovative mini hybrid gamma ray camera improves removal of tumours and lymph nodes

Innovative mini hybrid gamma ray camera improves removal of tumours and lymph nodes

Universities of Leicester and Nottingham to develop mini hybrid gamma ray camera to revolutionise identification and removal of tumours and lymph nodes [More]
DDW 2015: Experts explore efficacy of Stretta therapy for treating chronic GERD patients

DDW 2015: Experts explore efficacy of Stretta therapy for treating chronic GERD patients

A special presentation at Digestive Disease Week 2015 featured GERD experts weighing in on their successful experience using Stretta therapy to treat challenging patient populations suffering from GERD. [More]
New study examines best practices in teaching medical students to better detect skin lesions

New study examines best practices in teaching medical students to better detect skin lesions

Each year, thousands of Canadians are given the news: they have skin cancer. It is the most common form of cancer in Canada and around the world, but if detected early, survival rates are extremely high. According to Liam Rourke, it doesn't happen nearly as often as it could. [More]
Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way. [More]
Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

Researchers map out surgical anatomy, approaches for auditory brainstem implant placement

A technique called auditory brainstem implantation can restore hearing for patients who can't benefit from cochlear implants. A team of US and Japanese experts has mapped out the surgical anatomy and approaches for auditory brainstem implantation in the June issue of Operative Neurosurgery, published on behalf of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

Scripps Proton Therapy Center reports exceptional results in treating patients with pencil-beam scanning

The nation's first and only proton therapy center to treat patients exclusively with pencil-beam scanning is reporting exceptional results in delivering cancer treatment since opening for patient care just more than a year ago. [More]
Nerve cells guide each other during embryonic development

Nerve cells guide each other during embryonic development

When nerve cells form in an embryo they do not start off in the right place but have to be guided to their final position by navigating a kind of molecular and cellular "map" in order to function properly. In a recent research study published in Nature Communications neurobiologist Sara Wilson, Umeå University, found that during embryonic development different parts of the nerve cell are important for guiding other nerve cells into their physical positions. [More]
New work challenges long-held beliefs about link between hippocampus and improved memory function

New work challenges long-held beliefs about link between hippocampus and improved memory function

New work by the Douglas Mental Health University Institute (CIUSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'île-de-MontréalI) computational neuroscientist Mallar Chakravarty, PhD, and in collaboration with researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health challenges in a thrilling way the long-held belief that a larger hippocampus is directly linked to improved memory function. [More]
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