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Anemia is a decrease in normal number of red blood cells (RBCs) or less than the normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood. However, it can include decreased oxygen-binding ability of each hemoglobin molecule due to deformity or lack in numerical development as in some other types of hemoglobin deficiency. The three main classes of anemia include excessive blood loss (acutely such as a hemorrhage or chronically through low-volume loss), excessive blood cell destruction (hemolysis) or deficient red blood cell production (ineffective hematopoiesis). Anemia is the most common disorder of the blood. There are several kinds of anemia, produced by a variety of underlying causes. Anemia can be classified in a variety of ways, based on the morphology of RBCs, underlying etiologic mechanisms, and discernible clinical spectra, to mention a few.
Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

Scientists sequence genome of hookworm

In an advance that may potentially lead to new treatments for parasitic hookworms, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and Cornell University have sequenced the genome of the hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum. [More]
Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune licenses anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody from Amgen

Celimmune LLC, a clinical development-stage immunotherapy company focused on treating and preventing autoimmune diseases, announced today that it has licensed a Phase 2-stage, anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody (AMG 714) from Amgen. [More]
Minihepcidin reverses iron overload of hemochromatosis, stops susceptibility to infections

Minihepcidin reverses iron overload of hemochromatosis, stops susceptibility to infections

Hemochromatosis (HH) is the most common genetic disorder in the western world, and yet is barely known. Only in the US 1 in 9 people carry the mutation (although not necessarily the disease). [More]
Blood tests in heart surgery patients can lead to anemia, blood transfusions

Blood tests in heart surgery patients can lead to anemia, blood transfusions

Laboratory testing among patients undergoing cardiac surgery can lead to excessive bloodletting, which can increase the risk of developing hospital-acquired anemia and the need for blood transfusion, according to an article in the March 2015 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

A study published recently in the IBD Journal found significant differences in hospital readmissions, medication usage, and both medical and surgical complications of children with Crohn's disease related to race. In the study, black children had a 1.5 times higher frequency of hospital readmissions because of Crohn's disease compared to white children. [More]
Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted orphan drug designation for alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Eliglustat drug improves liver, spleen size and hemoglobin level in adults with Gaucher disease type 1

Eliglustat drug improves liver, spleen size and hemoglobin level in adults with Gaucher disease type 1

Among previously untreated adults with Gaucher disease type 1, a genetic disease in which there is improper metabolism due to a defect in an enzyme, treatment with the drug eliglustat resulted in significant improvements in liver and spleen size hemoglobin level, and platelet count, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
DaVita HealthCare Partners announces financial results for fourth quarter 2014

DaVita HealthCare Partners announces financial results for fourth quarter 2014

DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. today announced results for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2014. Income from continuing operations attributable to DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc. for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2014 was $208 million and $723 million, or $0.96 and $3.33 per share, respectively. [More]
Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Longer donor leukocyte telomere length linked to improved survival following HCT

Among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor, longer leukocyte (white blood cells) telomere length (a structure at the end of a chromosome) was associated with increased overall survival at 5 years, according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study shows low-dose oral iron supplementation after blood donation reduces hemoglobin recovery time

Study shows low-dose oral iron supplementation after blood donation reduces hemoglobin recovery time

Among blood donors with normal hemoglobin levels, low-dose oral iron supplementation, compared with no supplementation, reduced the time to recovery of the postdonation decrease in hemoglobin concentration in donors with low or higher levels of a marker of overall iron storage (ferritin), according to a study in the February 10 issue of JAMA. [More]
Readmissions after surgery associated with new postdischarge complications, shows study

Readmissions after surgery associated with new postdischarge complications, shows study

In a study that included readmission information from nearly 350 hospitals, readmissions the first 30 days after surgery were associated with new postdischarge complications related to the surgical procedure and not a worsening of any medical conditions the patient already had while hospitalized for surgery, according to a study in the February 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

FDA accepts Sangamo BioSciences' IND for SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. announced today that an Investigational New Drug (IND) application for the company's SB-BCLmR-HSPC genome editing approach, which is designed to provide a one-time lasting therapy for beta-thalassemia, has been accepted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is now active. [More]
Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen's biosimilar Phase 3 rheumatoid arthritis study meets primary and secondary endpoints

Amgen today announced a Phase 3 study evaluating the efficacy and safety of biosimilar candidate ABP 501 compared with Humira® (adalimumab) in patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis met its primary and key secondary endpoints. [More]
Study examines why hydroxyurea yields mixed results in children with sickle cell disease

Study examines why hydroxyurea yields mixed results in children with sickle cell disease

Electronic medication monitoring caps may help physicians put together the puzzle of why children taking a medicine that promises to curb sickle cell disease are showing mixed, confusing results. [More]
Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Some genetic features associated with modern diseases are ancient

Psoriasis, a chronic skin condition, can cause rashes that itch and sting. So why would a genetic susceptibility to this and other ailments persist for hundreds of thousands of years, afflicting our ancient ancestors, and us? [More]
SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

SCCA's Fred Hutch Bone Marrow Transplant Program achieves higher survival rates

The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance was recently recognized for outperforming its anticipated one-year survival rate for allogeneic transplant patients. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center has earned the coveted Baby-Friendly designation. This verifies that the hospital has implemented the ten steps to help new mothers successfully breastfeed. [More]
Researchers reveal key factor in understanding elevated cancer risk linked to gene therapy

Researchers reveal key factor in understanding elevated cancer risk linked to gene therapy

National Institutes of Health researchers have uncovered a key factor in understanding the elevated cancer risk associated with gene therapy. They conducted research on mice with a rare disease similar to one in humans, hoping their findings may eventually help improve gene therapy for humans. Researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute, part of NIH, published their research in the Jan. 20, 2015, online issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. [More]
Researchers find genetic mutation that causes glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit

Researchers find genetic mutation that causes glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit

A team of Canadian and Japanese researchers has identified the genetic mutation responsible for glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit in northern Quebec, Canada, in a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
John H. Postlethwait selected to receive GSA's George W. Beadle Award

John H. Postlethwait selected to receive GSA's George W. Beadle Award

The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce that John H. Postlethwait, PhD (University of Oregon) has been selected to receive the Society's George W. Beadle Award for outstanding contributions to the community of genetics researchers. [More]
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