Anemia News and Research RSS Feed - Anemia News and Research

Anemia is a decrease in normal number of red blood cells (RBCs) or less than the normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood. However, it can include decreased oxygen-binding ability of each hemoglobin molecule due to deformity or lack in numerical development as in some other types of hemoglobin deficiency. The three main classes of anemia include excessive blood loss (acutely such as a hemorrhage or chronically through low-volume loss), excessive blood cell destruction (hemolysis) or deficient red blood cell production (ineffective hematopoiesis). Anemia is the most common disorder of the blood. There are several kinds of anemia, produced by a variety of underlying causes. Anemia can be classified in a variety of ways, based on the morphology of RBCs, underlying etiologic mechanisms, and discernible clinical spectra, to mention a few.

Genetic basis of hereditary disease causes severe brain atrophy in Jews of Moroccan ancestry

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers have unraveled the genetic basis of a hereditary disease that causes severe brain atrophy, mental retardation and epilepsy in Jews of Moroccan ancestry, according to a study published this week online in the Journal of Medical Genetics. [More]
First Edition: March 10, 2014

First Edition: March 10, 2014

Today's headlines include reports about how the Virginia Assembly's impasse on Medicaid expansion is playing out. [More]
CIBMTR recognizes SCCA's Fred Hutchinson Bone Marrow Transplant Program

CIBMTR recognizes SCCA's Fred Hutchinson Bone Marrow Transplant Program

The Fred Hutchinson Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance was recently recognized by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research for outperforming its expected one-year survival rate for allogeneic transplant patients. The results published by the CIBMTR, analyzed the National Marrow Donor Program's (NMDP) registry of 168 U.S. transplant centers over a three-year period for its 2013 Transplant Center-Specific Survival Report. [More]
Iron deficiency predicts lower IQ scores in children adopted from institutional settings

Iron deficiency predicts lower IQ scores in children adopted from institutional settings

Iron deficiency predicts lower IQ scores and poor higher-order thinking skills in children adopted from institutional settings like orphanages, according to a new longitudinal study. [More]
Report highlights benefits of different access approach to treat uterine fibroids

Report highlights benefits of different access approach to treat uterine fibroids

Interventional radiologists have devised a new way to access a woman's fibroids-by flipping her wrist and treating via an arm not groin artery-to nonsurgically shrink noncancerous growths in the muscular wall of the uterus. Researchers found this to be less painful and traumatic for women, allowing them to immediately sit up and move after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE)-with no overnight stay, according to a March article in the Society of Interventional Radiology's flagship publication, the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. [More]
Washington Hospital recognized as 'Baby-Friendly Hospital'

Washington Hospital recognized as 'Baby-Friendly Hospital'

Washington Hospital has earned the distinction as a "Baby-Friendly Hospital" from the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative, a global program launched by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund. The designation recognizes hospitals and birthing centers that offer an optimal level of care for infant feeding and mother/baby bonding. Fewer than 175 hospitals in the U.S. are "Baby-Friendly." [More]
GTx provides clinical updates, reports financial results for fourth quarter and full year 2013

GTx provides clinical updates, reports financial results for fourth quarter and full year 2013

GTx, Inc. today provided a Company update and reported financial results for the fourth quarter and full year 2013. [More]
AbbVie's PEARL-III study meets primary, secondary endpoints in patients with chronic GT1b HCV infection

AbbVie's PEARL-III study meets primary, secondary endpoints in patients with chronic GT1b HCV infection

The first detailed results from AbbVie's pivotal phase III study, PEARL-III, were presented today as part of the 21st Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) press conference and will also be presented as a late-breaker at the conference on March 4. [More]
Cell Therapeutics initiates Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate pacritinib in patients with myelofibrosis

Cell Therapeutics initiates Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate pacritinib in patients with myelofibrosis

Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (CTI) (NASDAQ and MTA: CTIC) today announced the initiation of a Phase 3 clinical trial, known as PERSIST-2, which will evaluate pacritinib, a novel, investigational JAK2/FLT3 inhibitor, in patients with myelofibrosis whose platelet counts are less than or equal to 100,000 per microliter (uL). [More]
Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

Indonesia's commitment, investment in eliminating NTDs could lift millions of people out of poverty

The control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is one of the most cost-effective ways Indonesia can sustain economic growth and reduce inequality, said scientists today in an analysis published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. [More]

Penn research team discovers new cost-effective way to fight rare blood disorder

A University of Pennsylvania research team has defined a possible new way to fight a disease that is currently treatable only with the most expensive drug available for sale in the United States. [More]

Penn researchers identify possible new way to fight rare blood disorder

A University of Pennsylvania research team has defined a possible new way to fight a disease that is currently treatable only with the most expensive drug available for sale in the United States. In a study published this month in Blood, the Penn team describes the strategy, based on the oldest part of the human immune system - called "complement" -- that could turn out to be less costly and more effective for the majority of patients with a rare blood disorder. [More]
Pharmacyclics total revenue for fourth quarter 2013 increases 113% to $123.6 million

Pharmacyclics total revenue for fourth quarter 2013 increases 113% to $123.6 million

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today reported financial results and recent developments for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Discovery could lead to improved early detection, prevention strategies for sudden cardiac death

Discovery could lead to improved early detection, prevention strategies for sudden cardiac death

UC Irvine researchers have found a specific genetic flaw that is connected to sudden death due to heart arrhythmia - a leading cause of mortality for adults around the world. [More]
FDA grants full approval of SYNRIBO for injection

FDA grants full approval of SYNRIBO for injection

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted full approval of SYNRIBO (omacetaxine mepesuccinate) for injection. This oncology portfolio product received an accelerated approval in October, 2012 with additional clinical trial data required to fulfill post marketing requirements set forth by the FDA. [More]

Researchers discover pre-leukemic stem cell that triggers relapse in patients with AML

Cancer researchers led by stem cell scientist Dr. John Dick have discovered a pre-leukemic stem cell that may be the first step in initiating disease and also the culprit that evades therapy and triggers relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]

Ligand Pharmaceuticals' total revenues for Q4 2013 increase 8% to $14.7 million

Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated today reported financial results for the three and 12 months ended December 31, 2013, and provided an operating forecast and program updates. [More]

FDA grants Breakthrough Therapy designation to GSK's Promacta/Revolade for treatment of cytopenias

Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted its partner GlaxoSmithKline plc Breakthrough Therapy designation for Promacta/Revolade (eltrombopag) for the treatment of cytopenias in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) who have had insufficient response to immunosuppressive therapy. [More]
CTI announces initiation of pacritinib Phase 2 trial in AML patients with FLT3 mutations

CTI announces initiation of pacritinib Phase 2 trial in AML patients with FLT3 mutations

Cell Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the initiation of an international cooperative group Phase 2 clinical trial of pacritinib in adult patients with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mutations of the FLT3 gene. Mutation of the FLT3 gene is found in approximately one-third of AML patients and is an independent risk factor for poor prognosis. [More]

Researchers reveal how genetic susceptibility plays large role in cancer risk

In laboratory experiments conducted on human cell lines at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, scientists have shown that people carrying certain mutations in two hereditary cancer genes, BRCA2 and PALB2, may have a higher than usual susceptibility to DNA damage caused by a byproduct of alcohol, called acetaldehyde. [More]