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Anemia is a decrease in normal number of red blood cells (RBCs) or less than the normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood. However, it can include decreased oxygen-binding ability of each hemoglobin molecule due to deformity or lack in numerical development as in some other types of hemoglobin deficiency. The three main classes of anemia include excessive blood loss (acutely such as a hemorrhage or chronically through low-volume loss), excessive blood cell destruction (hemolysis) or deficient red blood cell production (ineffective hematopoiesis). Anemia is the most common disorder of the blood. There are several kinds of anemia, produced by a variety of underlying causes. Anemia can be classified in a variety of ways, based on the morphology of RBCs, underlying etiologic mechanisms, and discernible clinical spectra, to mention a few.
Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Musashi-2 protein regulates function, development of blood stem cells

Researchers at McMaster University's Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute have made significant steps forward in understanding the stem cells of the human blood system after discovering how a key protein allows for better control and regeneration of these cells. [More]
Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

Series of routine tests may not be beneficial to patients with age-related disorder

A series of tests physicians routinely order to help diagnose and follow their patients with an elevated antibody level that is a marker for cancer risk, often do not benefit the patient but do increase health care costs, pathologists report. [More]
Scientists use FAN1 knockout mice to refine detailed mechanisms involved in damaged DNA repair

Scientists use FAN1 knockout mice to refine detailed mechanisms involved in damaged DNA repair

Like jewels in a vault, our precious genetic material is stored in the nucleus of a cell--sequestered away from potentially damaging cellular components and toxins so that no harm can come to it. Yet over the course of a life moving through this world, our DNA does get damaged, and our cells have a host of complicated repair mechanisms to deal with such injuries. [More]
Inhalable form of Ambrisentan drug could offer faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema

Inhalable form of Ambrisentan drug could offer faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema

In a new study, researchers show an aerosolized, inhalable form of the drug Ambrisentan could offer a faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema, a life-threatening condition in which fluid accumulates in the lungs. Pulmonary edema is a significant risk for anyone spending time at high altitudes, and also affects people with chronic conditions including congestive heart failure and sickle cell anemia. [More]
GHIT Fund invests in two innovative malaria eradication tools

GHIT Fund invests in two innovative malaria eradication tools

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund) announced today that it’s investing US$1,383,785 in a pair of innovative malaria eradication tools—a vaccine that could block transmission of two species of the deadly disease and a rapid field test that can reveal a malaria infection in minutes. [More]
Whole genome sequencing of chimpanzee parasite reveals clues about human malaria

Whole genome sequencing of chimpanzee parasite reveals clues about human malaria

Understanding the origins of emerging diseases - as well as more established disease agents -- is critical to gauge future human infection risks and find new treatment and prevention approaches. This holds true for malaria, which kills more than 500,000 people a year. Symptoms, including severe anemia, pregnancy-associated malaria, and cerebral malaria, have been linked to the parasite's ability to cause infected red blood cells to bind to the inner lining of blood vessels. [More]
Study: Conservative care could be a reasonable choice for selected kidney failure patients

Study: Conservative care could be a reasonable choice for selected kidney failure patients

A new study found no significant survival advantage among elderly kidney failure patients who chose dialysis over conservative management. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, indicate that conservative care may be a reasonable choice for selected older patients. [More]
Clinical study finds no added benefit of using four TB drugs to save people with advanced HIV/AIDS

Clinical study finds no added benefit of using four TB drugs to save people with advanced HIV/AIDS

In a report on the so-called REMEMBER (Reducing Early Mortality and Early Morbidity by Empiric Tuberculosis Treatment) study -- a 10-nation, randomized clinical trial of adult outpatients -- investigators concluded that there was no added benefit of using four drugs for TB over just using one drug, isoniazid, to save lives in people with advanced HIV/AIDS. [More]
Consuming green tea with dietary iron may lessen health benefits of green tea

Consuming green tea with dietary iron may lessen health benefits of green tea

Green tea is touted for its many health benefits as a powerful antioxidant, but experiments in a laboratory mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease suggest that consuming green tea along with dietary iron may actually lessen green tea's benefits. [More]
Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria

Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria

Malaria killed about 440,000 people - mostly young children - last year, but a new drug candidate discovered at Rutgers may help fight the long-dreaded disease. [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Severe anemia associated with increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

Severe anemia associated with increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

A study from Emory University School of Medicine published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found that severe anemia, but not red blood cell transfusions (RBC), is associated with an increased risk for a potentially fatal intestinal condition in premature infants. [More]
Changes in use of anemia drugs affects risk of death or cardiovascular events in dialysis patients

Changes in use of anemia drugs affects risk of death or cardiovascular events in dialysis patients

A new study examines whether recent changes in the use of anemia drugs for patients on dialysis have contributed to changes in rates of death or cardiovascular events. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, indicate that these risks appear to be decreasing for patients on dialysis as well as for older adults (Medicare beneficiaries) who are not on dialysis. [More]
Kansas State researchers develop 3-D printed device that quickly detect anemia from blood

Kansas State researchers develop 3-D printed device that quickly detect anemia from blood

Identifying a blood disorder may be as easy as running a blood sample from a finger prick under a smartphone. That is the concept behind a new biomedical device being developed by Kansas State University researchers. [More]
Allergan receives FDA approval to market ACZONE (dapsone) Gel, 7.5% for acne treatment

Allergan receives FDA approval to market ACZONE (dapsone) Gel, 7.5% for acne treatment

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced that the Company has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to market ACZONE (dapsone) Gel, 7.5%, a new prescription topical treatment for acne in patients 12 years of age and older. [More]
Rigel begins fostamatinib Phase 2 trial for treatment of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia

Rigel begins fostamatinib Phase 2 trial for treatment of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia

Rigel Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced that it has initiated a Phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate fostamatinib, its oral SYK inhibitor, as a potential treatment for autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). [More]
New anti-ageing therapy may be effective against aplastic anaemia

New anti-ageing therapy may be effective against aplastic anaemia

Aplastic anaemia is a rare, and potentially fatal, disease of the blood, by which the bone marrow is unable to generate blood cells at the appropriate pace. Many forms of aplastic anaemia share an important link with the ageing process: the shortening of telomeres, structures that protect the ends of chromosomes. [More]
New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, vice chair of research in the Department of Pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center and an investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research , presented new definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis and septic shock at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's 45th Critical Care Congress in Orlando, FL. [More]
Pfizer’s IBRANCE (palbociclib) now approved for use in women with HR+, HER2- metastatic breast cancer

Pfizer’s IBRANCE (palbociclib) now approved for use in women with HR+, HER2- metastatic breast cancer

Pfizer Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new indication expanding the use of IBRANCE (palbociclib) 125mg capsules, Pfizer’s metastatic breast cancer therapy. [More]
Maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid improves fetal iron metabolism

Maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid improves fetal iron metabolism

A research has proven, for the first time, that maternal supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 essential polyunsaturated fatty acid, enhances fetal iron metabolism thanks to a greater expression of key genes regulating its transfer through the placenta. [More]
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