Anesthesiology News and Research RSS Feed - Anesthesiology News and Research

New hope for people suffering from depression

New hope for people suffering from depression

There is new hope for people suffering from depression. Researchers have identified a compound, hydroxynorketamine (HNK), that may treat symptoms of depression just as effectively and rapidly as ketamine, without the unwanted side effects associated with the psychoactive drug, according to a study in the July issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-). [More]
Five specific tests commonly performed in anesthesiology may not be necessary

Five specific tests commonly performed in anesthesiology may not be necessary

Proving that less really is more, five specific tests or procedures commonly performed in anesthesiology that may not be necessary and, in some cases should be avoided, will be published online June 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Sleep helps consolidate, strengthen new memories

Sleep helps consolidate, strengthen new memories

In study published today in Science, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center show for the first time that sleep after learning encourages the growth of dendritic spines, the tiny protrusions from brain cells that connect to other brain cells and facilitate the passage of information across synapses, the junctions at which brain cells meet. [More]
Symphony continuous glucose monitoring system study selected for presentation at ADA scientific sessions

Symphony continuous glucose monitoring system study selected for presentation at ADA scientific sessions

Echo Therapeutics, Inc., a medical device company developing its Symphony® CGM System as a non-invasive, wireless continuous glucose monitoring system, is pleased to announce that its most recently completed clinical study of Symphony was selected for poster presentation at the 74th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) which will be held June 13-17, 2014 in San Francisco, CA. [More]
Storing dantrolene can save 33 lives per year, say MH experts

Storing dantrolene can save 33 lives per year, say MH experts

MH experts say Storing dantrolene would save 33 lives per year at an incremental cost effectiveness ratio of nearly $200,000 (in 2010 dollars) per life saved, indicating that storing dantrolene at ambulatory surgical centers is very cost effective say, Malignant Hyperthermia Experts: Taiwo Aderibigbe, BS; Barbara H. Lang, BS; Henry Rosenberg, MD; Guohua Li, MD, PhD, Columbia University, New York who authored the article "Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Stocking Dantrolene in Ambulatory Surgery Centers" that was recently published in the latest official journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Anesthesiology. [More]
Son's vulnerability for alcohol use disorders could be shaped by father

Son's vulnerability for alcohol use disorders could be shaped by father

Even before conception, a son's vulnerability for alcohol use disorders could be shaped by a father who chronically drinks to excess, according to a new animal study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
SYNERA can help prevent needle stick pain associated with superficial IVs

SYNERA can help prevent needle stick pain associated with superficial IVs

Galen US Incorporated today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved a labeling change that allows SYNERA® (lidocaine and tetracaine) topical patch to be used at home. [More]
Hypertensive pregnant women who snore may have unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea

Hypertensive pregnant women who snore may have unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea

1 in 2 hypertensive pregnant women who habitually snore may have unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea, a sleeping disorder that can reduce blood oxygen levels during the night and that has been linked to serious health conditions, new University of Michigan-led research shows. [More]
AMSURG acquires Sheridan Healthcare in cash and stock transaction valued at $2.35 billion

AMSURG acquires Sheridan Healthcare in cash and stock transaction valued at $2.35 billion

AMSURG Corp. and Sheridan Healthcare, a portfolio company of Hellman & Friedman, LLC, today announced that their respective Boards of Directors have unanimously approved a definitive agreement under which AMSURG will acquire Sheridan Healthcare in a cash and stock transaction valued at approximately $2.35 billion. [More]
New antibody appears to block sensations of pain, itching in mouse model

New antibody appears to block sensations of pain, itching in mouse model

Duke University researchers have found an antibody that simultaneously blocks the sensations of pain and itching in studies with mice. [More]
Patients experience fewer postoperative complications when surgical safety checklist is used

Patients experience fewer postoperative complications when surgical safety checklist is used

Patients experience fewer postoperative complications when a surgical safety checklist is used by their surgical team, reports the first large-scale review on the subject published in the June issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists® (ASA®). [More]
Serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare

Serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare

Expectant mothers concerned about receiving an epidural, spinal or general anesthesia during childbirth can breathe a little easier. According to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, serious complications due to anesthesia during childbirth are very rare, occurring in one out of every 3,000 deliveries. [More]
EU-funded project finds way to improve patients' pain treatment after surgery

EU-funded project finds way to improve patients' pain treatment after surgery

Millions of people undergo surgery each year. Many of them suffer from moderate to severe pain afterwards. This post-operative pain may impede recovery or even lead on into chronic pain. Now, the EU-funded project PAIN-OUT, completed in 2012, may have found a way to improve patients' pain treatment after surgery. [More]
Recycling patients' red blood cells during heart surgery better than banked blood transfusion

Recycling patients' red blood cells during heart surgery better than banked blood transfusion

Patients whose own red blood cells are recycled and given back to them during heart surgery have healthier blood cells better able to carry oxygen where it is most needed compared to those who get transfusions of blood stored in a blood bank, according to results of a small study at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Mortality after cardiac surgery: an interview with Dr. Bryan G. Maxwell, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Mortality after cardiac surgery: an interview with Dr. Bryan G. Maxwell, Johns Hopkins Medicine

The last decade has seen a strong movement towards the use of various quality measurements to grade medical care. In surgery, 30-day mortality is one of the most common benchmarks. We wanted to determine if patterns of postoperative mortality showed any signs that the process of measuring medical care might actually alter how (and when) care is provided or withdrawn. [More]
Study: Depression affects more than one out of three critical care survivors

Study: Depression affects more than one out of three critical care survivors

Depression affects more than one out of three survivors of critical illness, according to a Vanderbilt study released in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, and the majority of patients experience their symptoms physically rather than mentally. [More]
Enhanced recovery approach used for colorectal surgery cut hospital stays

Enhanced recovery approach used for colorectal surgery cut hospital stays

Changes in managing patients before, during and after colorectal surgery cut hospital stays by two days and reduced readmission rates, according to researchers who led a study of the approach at Duke University Hospital. [More]
Better educated people appear to recover from traumatic brain injury

Better educated people appear to recover from traumatic brain injury

Better-educated people appear to be significantly more likely to recover from a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), suggesting that a brain's "cognitive reserve" may play a role in helping people get back to their previous lives, new Johns Hopkins research shows. [More]
New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

New tool can help doctors identify patients at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery

A new prediction tool can help doctors better identify patients who are at highest risk for respiratory failure after surgery and therefore prevent the often deadly condition, suggest data from a large multi-center study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology. [More]
Study helps physicians better identify patients at risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome

Study helps physicians better identify patients at risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. [More]