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Researchers identify potential drug target in skin for itchy feeling

Researchers identify potential drug target in skin for itchy feeling

No matter the trigger -- bug bites, a medication side-effect or an itchy wound -- the urge to scratch can be a real pain. Researchers at the Duke University Medical Center have identified a potential drug target in the skin for that itchy feeling. [More]
Neck pain more common in women than in men, Loyola study finds

Neck pain more common in women than in men, Loyola study finds

Women are 1.38 times more likely than men to report neck pain due to cervical degenerative disc disease, according to a study of adult patients treated at Loyola Medicine's Pain Management Center. [More]
New study sheds light on challenges in addressing post-operative bleeding in newborns

New study sheds light on challenges in addressing post-operative bleeding in newborns

A new study finds significant differences between the blood clot structure in adults and newborns, helping researchers better understand the challenges in addressing post-operative bleeding in neonatal patients. [More]
New pain management technique can reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients

New pain management technique can reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients

Anesthesiologists can significantly reduce loss of muscle strength in ACL knee surgery patients using a new pain management technique, a new study has found. [More]
New review suggests solutions that can help ease chronic pain in women

New review suggests solutions that can help ease chronic pain in women

Women often suffer silently when in pain, whether it's caused by pregnancy discomfort or creaky knees. Yet there are a variety of solutions that can help relieve women of chronic pain, from exercise to identifying triggers, suggests a new review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Study may lead to potential drug targets for tumor formation in pulmonary tuberous sclerosis complex

Study may lead to potential drug targets for tumor formation in pulmonary tuberous sclerosis complex

In a new study published in the American Association of Cancer Research's journal Cancer Research, a pair of investigators at Rutgers and Columbia universities has identified a gene that may provide a new source of potential drug targets for tumors that arise in pulmonary tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). [More]
Aerobic exercise may prevent alcohol-related liver damage

Aerobic exercise may prevent alcohol-related liver damage

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, excessive alcohol use is responsible for more than 80,000 deaths in the United States each year. Over time, excessive drinking can lead to several chronic conditions, such as fatty liver disease and cirrhosis. [More]
New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes. [More]
Noninvasive FMRI may help evaluate effectiveness of new pain medications

Noninvasive FMRI may help evaluate effectiveness of new pain medications

New research may allow new, more effective and safer pain medications to reach patients who suffer from chronic pain sooner. According to a recent study published in Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI), to measure the brain's neural response to pain, may be a viable tool for evaluating the effectiveness of new pain medications during the early stages of human drug development - providing the needed objective evidence to prevent the premature discarding of potentially beneficial therapies. [More]
Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Depending on which hospital you go to for your low-risk surgical procedure, you may be 2.4 times more or less likely to be sent for unnecessary blood tests. This is among the findings of a study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Women's College Hospital Institute for Health Systems Solutions and Virtual Care. [More]
Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program releases new standards document

Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program releases new standards document

The Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program, a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, has released its latest standards document, Optimal Resources for Children's Surgical Care. [More]
Genetics play vital role in knee pain sensitivity

Genetics play vital role in knee pain sensitivity

Genetics play a key role in knee pain sensitivity, according to a team of researchers studying knee osteoarthritis patients. [More]
New UTMB study reveals link between traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease

New UTMB study reveals link between traumatic brain injury and Alzheimer's disease

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston fills an important gap in understanding the link between traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Physician-researchers find link between 'dry eye' and chronic pain syndromes

Physician-researchers find link between 'dry eye' and chronic pain syndromes

Physician-researchers with Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of UHealth--the University of Miami Health System, have found a link between "dry eye" and chronic pain syndromes -- a finding that suggests that a new paradigm is needed for diagnosis and treatment to improve patient outcomes. [More]

UAB announces ASA endorsement of MOCA simulation course

The UAB Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine has announced American Society of Anesthesiology endorsement of the UAB simulation program. [More]
Discovery Life's new unscripted docudrama series highlights lifesaving work by SOM and Shock Trauma caregivers

Discovery Life's new unscripted docudrama series highlights lifesaving work by SOM and Shock Trauma caregivers

Discovery Life's new unscripted docudrama series Shock Trauma: Edge of Life follows a team of medical professionals at the world-renown R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland ("Shock Trauma"). [More]
Toronto researchers reveal how opioids interfere with breathing mechanism

Toronto researchers reveal how opioids interfere with breathing mechanism

University of Toronto researchers on a quest to make opioid drugs less lethal have discovered a window of opportunity: a tiny channel in the brain where opioids interfere with the breathing mechanism. [More]
Stanford study finds that overprescription of opioids goes beyond ‘pill mill’ prescribers

Stanford study finds that overprescription of opioids goes beyond ‘pill mill’ prescribers

Most prescriptions for opioid painkillers are made by the broad swath of U.S. general practitioners, not by a limited group of specialists, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
BD announces launch of BD FACSCelesta flow cytometer during ASCB annual meeting

BD announces launch of BD FACSCelesta flow cytometer during ASCB annual meeting

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today announced the launch of the BD FACSCelesta flow cytometer during the 2015 American Society for Cell Biology annual meeting. Uniquely designed to leverage the broad BD Horizon Brilliant reagent portfolio, this new system offers simultaneous measurement of up to 14 different single cell characteristics. [More]
Study: Spanish-speaking Hispanic women less likely to use neuraxial analgesia during labor

Study: Spanish-speaking Hispanic women less likely to use neuraxial analgesia during labor

Why do Hispanic women have reduced rates of epidural or spinal (neuraxial) analgesia during labor? Language barriers may be a key factor, according to a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
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