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Patients using public health insurance more likely to experience high pain levels in PACU, study finds

Patients using public health insurance more likely to experience high pain levels in PACU, study finds

Patients using public health insurance were more likely to experience high pain levels in the post anesthesia care unit following surgery to remove their tonsils and/or adenoids, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
ERAS programs help patients better prepare for surgery and recover faster, studies reveal

ERAS programs help patients better prepare for surgery and recover faster, studies reveal

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs, an important component of the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH), are helping patients better prepare for surgery and recuperate faster afterward, according to two new studies being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
PSH model of care provides better outcomes and decreases length of hospital stay

PSH model of care provides better outcomes and decreases length of hospital stay

Decreasing the number of tests, blood transfusions and length of time in the hospital, while improving patients' pain management and communication with physicians were the results of implementing the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH) model of care at TEAMHealth Anesthesia at Tampa General Hospital in Tampa, Fla., according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Research finds rise in number of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia outside of O.R.

Research finds rise in number of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia outside of O.R.

More than one-third of Americans who undergo procedures involving anesthesia now have them outside of the operating room (O.R.), an increase of 27 percent in five years, according to an analysis of a large registry being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Many back pain patients taking opioids get limited relief and worry about side effects, study finds

Many back pain patients taking opioids get limited relief and worry about side effects, study finds

Millions of people take opioids for chronic back pain, but many of them get limited relief while experiencing side effects and worrying about the stigma associated with taking them, suggests research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
Preoperative anxiety may be huge problem among Latinos, new research suggests

Preoperative anxiety may be huge problem among Latinos, new research suggests

Latinos may be more anxious than Caucasian patients about having surgery and also want more detailed information before having a procedure, suggests research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
U-M investigators awarded $7.5 million NIH grant to expand chronic pain research

U-M investigators awarded $7.5 million NIH grant to expand chronic pain research

In order to better understand the disparity between identifiable damage and chronic pain, the National Institutes of Health has awarded $7.5 million over five years to physician-scientists at the University of Michigan Health System. [More]
Exposure to general anesthesia in young children not linked to long-term effects on brain development

Exposure to general anesthesia in young children not linked to long-term effects on brain development

Children who are exposed to general anesthesia from birth to age 2 have developmental testing results in kindergarten that are similar to those of children who have not been exposed, according to a new study published in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Surgically implanted neurostimulator system helps alleviate chronic pain

Surgically implanted neurostimulator system helps alleviate chronic pain

When the damaged nerves in Anthony Newberry's foot healed incorrectly after a workplace accident, it left him feeling "like my foot was exploding for hours at a time," he says. [More]
Penn researchers develop computer model for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers

Penn researchers develop computer model for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers

A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has developed a computer model that will aid in the design of nanocarriers, microscopic structures used to guide drugs to their targets in the body. [More]
Sleep researchers call for new diagnostic criteria to treat OSA in pregnant women

Sleep researchers call for new diagnostic criteria to treat OSA in pregnant women

Recent studies reveal that approximately one quarter of pregnant women may suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), the recurrent cessation or limitation of normal breathing during sleep. [More]
Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers identify how sensory nerve receptors work together to transmit itch signals

Researchers have found how sensory nerve cells work together to transmit itch signals from the skin to the spinal cord, where neurons then carry those signals to the brain. Their discovery may help scientists find more effective ways to make itching stop. [More]
Combination approach could be more effective to treat fibromyalgia pain

Combination approach could be more effective to treat fibromyalgia pain

Queen's University researcher Ian Gilron has uncovered a more effective way of treating fibromyalgia, a medical condition characterized by chronic widespread pain typically accompanied by fatigue, as well as sleep, mood and memory problems. [More]
ASA recommends parents to ask seven questions to child's physician anesthesiologist prior to surgery

ASA recommends parents to ask seven questions to child's physician anesthesiologist prior to surgery

Millions of children have surgery every year - for everything from tonsil removal to correction of a heart defect - and understandably parents are often anxious about their child's safety and comfort. [More]
Study finds preoperative falls common among adults of all age groups

Study finds preoperative falls common among adults of all age groups

In a large study of 15,000 adults undergoing elective surgery, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that falling up to six months before an operation is common and often causes serious injuries — not only in elderly patients but across all age groups. Surprisingly, the frequency of falls among middle-aged patients was slightly higher than those who were age 65 or older. [More]
Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Most people recoil at the thought of ingesting E. coli. But what if the headline-grabbing bacteria could be used to fight disease? [More]
Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest study of the topic to date. [More]
Researchers receive grant to improve quality of donor limb, tissue for transplant

Researchers receive grant to improve quality of donor limb, tissue for transplant

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine faculty member has received $998,500 from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a new approach to improve the quality and quantity of limbs and tissues obtained from brain dead organ donors. [More]
Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a condition mostly observed in older patients following surgery under general anesthesia, is characterized by impaired memory and concentration. The impairment may be temporary or permanent and incapacitating. [More]
Novel adaptive mechanisms in hibernating animals may provide clues to mitigate cardiac injury

Novel adaptive mechanisms in hibernating animals may provide clues to mitigate cardiac injury

Novel adaptations discovered in hibernating animals may reveal ways to mitigate injuries associated with strokes, heart attacks and organ transplants, according to researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Duke University. [More]
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