Anesthesiology News and Research RSS Feed - Anesthesiology News and Research

Screening and treating OSA patients prior to surgery reduce risk of cardiovascular complications

Screening and treating OSA patients prior to surgery reduce risk of cardiovascular complications

Scheduled for surgery? New research suggests that you may want to get screened and treated for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) before going under the knife. According to a first-of-its-kind study in the October issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists-, patients with OSA who are diagnosed and treated for the condition prior to surgery are less likely to develop serious cardiovascular complications such as cardiac arrest or shock. [More]
Desaturation 'area under the curve' may help in monitoring patient safety during procedures

Desaturation 'area under the curve' may help in monitoring patient safety during procedures

The "area under the curve of oxygen desaturation" (AUCDesat) may provide a more sophisticated approach to monitoring blood oxygen levels during procedures using sedation, according to a study published in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
New evidence-based guidelines for prevention, treatment of POAF

New evidence-based guidelines for prevention, treatment of POAF

The American Association for Thoracic Surgery has released new evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and treatment of perioperative and postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) and flutter for thoracic surgical procedures. [More]
University of Michigan Health System becomes one of best places for young doctors to train

University of Michigan Health System becomes one of best places for young doctors to train

Doctors nationwide rate the University of Michigan Health System as one of the best places for young doctors to train in their chosen field, across 20 medical specialties, according to a new ranking released today. [More]
Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

The understanding of how long-duration space flight affects the human body has come on quite considerably in recent years, and in large part, we owe that to programs of research that have taken place aboard the International Space Station and the Mir Space Station. [More]
Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

A gene crucial for brain and heart development may also be associated with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the most common cause of early mortality in epilepsy patients. [More]
Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Although scientists know the basic neural circuits involved in sensing and responding to such painful stimuli, they are still sorting out the molecular players. [More]
Review of clinical trials based on administering antidepressants for chronic postsurgical pain

Review of clinical trials based on administering antidepressants for chronic postsurgical pain

After a systematic review of clinical trials based on administering antidepressants for acute and chronic postsurgical pain, researchers have concluded that more trials are needed to determine whether these drugs should be prescribed for postsurgical pain on a regular basis. [More]
New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

New UCLA study finds that oxidized lipids may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension

Oxidized lipids are known to play a key role in inflaming blood vessels and hardening arteries, which causes diseases like atherosclerosis. A new study at UCLA demonstrates that they may also contribute to pulmonary hypertension, a serious lung disease that narrows the small blood vessels in the lungs. [More]
Studies support clinical use of antidepressants for treatment of postoperative pain

Studies support clinical use of antidepressants for treatment of postoperative pain

Antidepressants are known to provide effective pain relief for various chronic pain conditions; however, the jury is still out on their use in treating the millions of patients who suffer from acute or chronic pain following surgery. [More]
New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

New therapeutic drug may prevent respiratory depression in patients taking opioid medication

People taking prescription opioids to treat moderate to severe pain may be able to breathe a little easier, literally. [More]
Penn researchers analyze clinical practice guidelines

Penn researchers analyze clinical practice guidelines

The common thought in the medical community is that the randomized, controlled trial is the gold standard in medical research. [More]
Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher surgical risk

Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher surgical risk

Patients with low blood levels of vitamin D are at increased risk of death and serious complications after noncardiac surgery, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Elsevier launches new open access journal, Neurobiology of Stress

Elsevier launches new open access journal, Neurobiology of Stress

Elsevier, world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the launch of a new open access journal: Neurobiology of Stress. [More]
Dentist educates patients about sedation dentistry

Dentist educates patients about sedation dentistry

The American Dental Association estimates that as much as 10 percent of the American population have dental phobia. Dental phobia is a severe anxiety or dread of making a trip to the dentist. [More]
New anesthesia procedure demonstrates cause of obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea

New anesthesia procedure demonstrates cause of obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea

A simplified anesthesia procedure may enable more widespread use of preoperative testing to demonstrate the cause of airway obstruction in patients with severe sleep apnea, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Study provides potential drug targets for transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

Study provides potential drug targets for transient cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

Mitochondria play an important role in neuronal apoptosis caused by cerebral ischemia. Researchers at the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, China discovered transient ischemia led to cell apoptosis in the hippocampus and changes in memory and cognition of aged rats. [More]
Health care organizations partner to improve patient care, health care delivery and reduce costs

Health care organizations partner to improve patient care, health care delivery and reduce costs

The American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-) today announced the launch of its ASA Perioperative Surgical Home Learning Collaborative, a national initiative designed to improve the patient experience before, during and after surgery. More than 40 leading health care organizations from across the country will participate in the collaborative, which will convene for the first time at the ASA's PSH Learning Collaborative Launch, July 25-26, in Schaumburg, Ill. [More]

Two ASA-affiliated organizations win ASAE's 2014 Power of A Award

The American Society of Association Executives announced its 2014 Power of A Award winners, including two affiliated organizations of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Stimulating specific brain pathway may induce active emergence from anesthesia

Researchers may be one step closer to better understanding how anesthesia works. A study in the August issue of Anesthesiology, the official medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists- (ASA-), found stimulating a major dopamine-producing region in the brain, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), caused rats to wake from general anesthesia, suggesting that this region plays a key role in restoring consciousness after general anesthesia. [More]