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Study compares new cardiopulmonary resuscitation with standard CPR in cardiac arrest

Study compares new cardiopulmonary resuscitation with standard CPR in cardiac arrest

Continuous chest compression, touted as the new way to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, was not an improvement over standard CPR, according to findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine today. The University of Alabama at Birmingham was one of eight United States and Canadian universities involved in the study, the largest such study of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest ever conducted. [More]
Combatting viral and bacterial lung infections with volatile anesthetics: an interview with Dr Chakravarthy

Combatting viral and bacterial lung infections with volatile anesthetics: an interview with Dr Chakravarthy

Inhaled anesthetics are fairly common all over the world for minor and extensive surgical procedures in patients of all age groups. In the olden days when anesthesia was first developed, ether was the first inhaled anesthetic. That has been replaced, with the more recent discoveries of sevoflurane, isoflurane, and desflurane. [More]
CareFusion to display new respiratory solutions at AARC Congress

CareFusion to display new respiratory solutions at AARC Congress

CareFusion, a BD company, will be displaying new respiratory solutions that are designed to put patients first, whether ventilated or breathing on their own, at the American Association for Respiratory Care Congress being held Nov. 7-10 in Tampa, Fla. [More]
UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece to be honored with 2015 David E. Rogers Award

UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece to be honored with 2015 David E. Rogers Award

The Association of American Medical Colleges announced today that University of Maryland School of Medicine Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, will receive the 2015 David E. Rogers Award, which honors a medical school faculty member who has made major contributions to improving the health and health care of the American people. He will be presented the Award on November 8, 2015 at the AAMC's Annual Awards Event. [More]
BD reports quarterly adjusted revenues of $3.067 billion for fourth fiscal quarter 2015

BD reports quarterly adjusted revenues of $3.067 billion for fourth fiscal quarter 2015

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, today reported quarterly adjusted revenues of $3.067 billion for the fourth fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2015, an increase of 39.3 percent over the prior-year period as reported, or 49.1 percent on a currency-neutral basis. [More]
Penn Medicine study shows that married people fare better following heart surgery

Penn Medicine study shows that married people fare better following heart surgery

Patients who are divorced, separated or widowed had an approximately 40 percent greater chance of dying or developing a new functional disability in the first two years following cardiac surgery than their married peers, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published in this week's JAMA Surgery. [More]

Amount of anesthetic needed for general anesthesia during surgery varies widely

The amount of anesthetic required for general anesthesia during surgery varies widely from patient to patient and some may be able to receive a lower dose than typically administered, suggests a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Conversational hypnosis may do better job than pills for relaxing patients before surgery

Conversational hypnosis may do better job than pills for relaxing patients before surgery

Anxious patients heading into surgery often receive medication to ease their fears, but a few calming words from their physicians might actually be more effective medicine. In fact, "conversational hypnosis" as the approach is known, may do a better job than pills for relaxing patients before anesthesia and surgery, suggests research being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Multimodal non-invasive neurological monitoring reduces postoperative delirium in older cardiac patients

Multimodal non-invasive neurological monitoring reduces postoperative delirium in older cardiac patients

Patients undergoing cardiac surgery are at an increased risk of developing delirium and other changes in cognitive function in the days following surgery. However, new research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting, found using monitors to track depth of anesthesia and oxygenation levels in older patients' brains during cardiac surgery significantly reduced their incidence of postoperative delirium and associated cognitive decline. [More]
Stopping cholesterol medications before surgery may increase risk of death during recovery

Stopping cholesterol medications before surgery may increase risk of death during recovery

Patients who stop taking cholesterol medications before surgery are following outdated recommendations, and significantly increasing their risk of death if they don't resume taking the medications within two days after surgery, according to a study of more than 300,000 patients being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Brief exposure to general anesthesia during infancy does not affect neurological development

Brief exposure to general anesthesia during infancy does not affect neurological development

Although the medical community has raised concerns about the safety of anesthesia on the developing brains of young children, new research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting, found brief exposure to general anesthesia during infancy did not impair neurological development. This is the first prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial to assess the long-term, neurological effects of anesthesia in children. [More]
Limited use of general anesthesia does not cause developmental problems for children

Limited use of general anesthesia does not cause developmental problems for children

An international team of researchers that includes a pediatric anesthesiologist from the University of Colorado School of Medicine and Children's Hospital Colorado is reporting that limited use of general anesthesia with an infant does not cause developmental problems for the child. [More]
CareFusion, AAM Healthcare sign exclusive distribution agreement for APA video laryngoscope

CareFusion, AAM Healthcare sign exclusive distribution agreement for APA video laryngoscope

CareFusion, a BD company, today announced its Vital Signs anesthesia delivery and patient monitoring business has entered into an exclusive agreement with AAM Healthcare to distribute its APA video laryngoscope in the U.S. and 12 other countries. [More]
Study: Pediatric patients prescribed more opioid medication than necessary following surgery

Study: Pediatric patients prescribed more opioid medication than necessary following surgery

Although it is not uncommon for pediatric patients to be prescribed opioids to treat certain types of moderate to severe pain, new research suggests these patients may be prescribed more opioids than necessary following surgery. A study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting found nearly 60 percent of opioids dispensed to pediatric patients following surgery remained unused, which could lead to the unused medication being abused by other adolescents in the household. [More]
Magnesium sulfate has protective effect on maternal fever during labor

Magnesium sulfate has protective effect on maternal fever during labor

Women who received magnesium sulfate during labor were less likely to develop maternal fever, a condition that can lead to a variety of complications in newborns including difficulty breathing, seizures, cerebral palsy and a condition known as "floppy baby syndrome," characterized by inadequate muscle tone, according to a retrospective study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting in San Diego. [More]
Hispanic, Medicaid patients less likely to receive regional anesthesia during hip and knee replacement surgery

Hispanic, Medicaid patients less likely to receive regional anesthesia during hip and knee replacement surgery

Patients who are black, Hispanic, on Medicaid or are uninsured may be less likely to receive regional anesthesia during hip and knee replacement surgery, possibly putting them at greater risk of serious complications, according to a study of more than 1 million orthopedic surgeries being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Common steroid medication does not reduce risk of long-term pain after heart surgery

Common steroid medication does not reduce risk of long-term pain after heart surgery

A common steroid medication does not ease long-term pain at the incision site made during open-heart surgery, according to results of a large multicenter randomized controlled trial being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Nitrous oxide shows promise in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Nitrous oxide shows promise in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease

Nitrous oxide, an effective and inexpensive anesthetic, is safe for surgical patients who have or are at risk for cardiovascular disease, according to results of a large randomized controlled trial being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. [More]
Decision aids help patients talk about their anesthesia and pain relief options

Decision aids help patients talk about their anesthesia and pain relief options

"Decision aids" in the form of informational brochures help get patients talking about their anesthesia and pain relief options, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting. Shared decision making is critical to a more patient-centered process, as well as helping patients take an active role in their medical decisions. [More]
Taking blood pressure level before a patient enters O.R. may produce more accurate measurements

Taking blood pressure level before a patient enters O.R. may produce more accurate measurements

When a patient arrives in the operating room (O.R.) for surgery, one of the first things a physician will do is take his or her blood pressure, a "baseline" measurement used throughout the procedure. However, a new study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2015 annual meeting found blood pressure taken before the patient enters the O.R. may produce more accurate measurements and should be used to determine baseline blood pressure. [More]
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