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Covidien launches Pipeline Flex embolization device at annual LINNC in Paris

Covidien launches Pipeline Flex embolization device at annual LINNC in Paris

Further strengthening its broad line of neurovascular products to treat unruptured brain aneurysms, Covidien plc announced the European launch of its Pipeline™ Flex embolization device at the annual Live Interventional Neuroradiology & Neurosurgery Course (LINNC), held in Paris June 23-25. This next-generation flow diversion device received CE Mark earlier this year. [More]
New study show direct link between depression and medication nonadherence

New study show direct link between depression and medication nonadherence

A new study led by Alan B. Ettinger, M.D., M.B.A., Director of the Epilepsy Center at Neurological Surgery, P.C., has found that many patients who fail to take their antiseizure medications are suffering from depression. [More]
1% of adults experience headaches associated with sexual activity, shows report

1% of adults experience headaches associated with sexual activity, shows report

About 1 percent of adults report they have experienced headaches associated with sexual activity, and that such headaches can be severe. [More]

Pulsar Vascular announces FDA approval of PulseRider IDE for intracranial bifurcation aneurysms

Pulsar Vascular, the innovator and developer of the PulseRider, a minimally invasive, aneurysm neck reconstruction device, announced today the United States Food and Drug Administration's approval of an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) for the PulseRider. [More]
Lombard Medical showcases Aorfix Endovascular Stent Graft at SVS Annual Meeting

Lombard Medical showcases Aorfix Endovascular Stent Graft at SVS Annual Meeting

Lombard Medical, Inc., a medical device company focused on Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), showcased its Aorfix Endovascular Stent Graft at the 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery Annual Meeting in Boston, June 5-7. [More]
Blood pressure has heterogeneous associations with cardiovascular diseases

Blood pressure has heterogeneous associations with cardiovascular diseases

The associations between blood pressure and cardiovascular disease are variable, reveals a large study that highlights the impact of angina and heart failure. [More]
Edge Therapeutics commences enrollment in second cohort of EG-1962 Phase 1/2 NEWTON study for aSAH

Edge Therapeutics commences enrollment in second cohort of EG-1962 Phase 1/2 NEWTON study for aSAH

Edge Therapeutics, a clinical-stage biotechnology company that discovers, develops and seeks to commercialize novel, hospital-based therapies for acute, life-threatening neurological conditions, today announced that it has initiated patient enrollment in the second cohort of the NEWTON study, a multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label, Phase 1/2 clinical trial of the company's lead product candidate, EG-1962. [More]
Systolic, diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases

Systolic, diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases

Raised systolic and diastolic blood pressures may have different effects on different types of cardiovascular diseases and at different ages, according to new research involving 1.25 million patients from primary care practices in England published in a special themed issue of The Lancet. [More]
New research sheds light on brain aneurysm

New research sheds light on brain aneurysm

New research by an international consortium, including a researcher from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, may help physicians better understand the chronological development of a brain aneurysm. [More]
Finnish study: Size of aneurysm does not impact risk of brain aneurysms rupture

Finnish study: Size of aneurysm does not impact risk of brain aneurysms rupture

Approximately one third of all brain aneurysms rupture during a patient's lifetime, resulting in a brain haemorrhage. A recent Finnish study demonstrates that, unlike what was previously assumed, the size of the aneurysm does not significantly impact the risk of rupture. [More]
Amsel Medical files 510(K) Pre-Marketing Notification with FDA for Amsel Occluder Device

Amsel Medical files 510(K) Pre-Marketing Notification with FDA for Amsel Occluder Device

Amsel Medical Corporation today announced that it has successfully completed filing of a Pre-Marketing Notification (510(k)) with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Amsel Occluder Device. [More]
ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
UT Southwestern launches telemedicine program to extend stroke care to patients in rural areas

UT Southwestern launches telemedicine program to extend stroke care to patients in rural areas

UT Southwestern Medical Center has launched a state-of-the-art telemedicine program that will extend immediate access to UT Southwestern's nationally recognized stroke care during the crucial time period when treatment is needed for a patient of an ischemic stroke, or clot in one of the brain's blood vessels. [More]
Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]
Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage is criticized for many things — justly and unjustly — but not heart disease, according to findings of a recent study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country - believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed - found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed. [More]

NYSS affiliates with International Journal of Surgery to access important research

The New York Surgical Society (NYSS) has decided to affiliate with the International Journal of Surgery in an agreement that gives members of the Society easy access to the important research published by the journal and marks the growth in the journal's international reach. [More]
Loyola surgeon successfully performs operation on patient suffering from rare disorder

Loyola surgeon successfully performs operation on patient suffering from rare disorder

Jarely Sanchez is an affectionate, energetic little girl who loves ballet. "Everyone she meets, she connects with," said her father, Jose Angel Ulloa. "She's like a magnet." But for more than a week, the three-year-old girl wasn't herself. [More]
Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Call it what you will - getting red in the face, hot under the collar, losing your cool, blowing your top - we all experience anger. And while we know that anger is a normal, sometimes even beneficial emotion, we're also aware of the often harmful connection between anger and health. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical shows an even more compelling reason to think about getting anger in check - a nearly fivefold increase in risk for heart attack in the two hours following outbursts of anger. [More]