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New research sheds light on brain aneurysm

New research sheds light on brain aneurysm

New research by an international consortium, including a researcher from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, may help physicians better understand the chronological development of a brain aneurysm. [More]
Finnish study: Size of aneurysm does not impact risk of brain aneurysms rupture

Finnish study: Size of aneurysm does not impact risk of brain aneurysms rupture

Approximately one third of all brain aneurysms rupture during a patient's lifetime, resulting in a brain haemorrhage. A recent Finnish study demonstrates that, unlike what was previously assumed, the size of the aneurysm does not significantly impact the risk of rupture. [More]
Amsel Medical files 510(K) Pre-Marketing Notification with FDA for Amsel Occluder Device

Amsel Medical files 510(K) Pre-Marketing Notification with FDA for Amsel Occluder Device

Amsel Medical Corporation today announced that it has successfully completed filing of a Pre-Marketing Notification (510(k)) with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Amsel Occluder Device. [More]
ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
UT Southwestern launches telemedicine program to extend stroke care to patients in rural areas

UT Southwestern launches telemedicine program to extend stroke care to patients in rural areas

UT Southwestern Medical Center has launched a state-of-the-art telemedicine program that will extend immediate access to UT Southwestern's nationally recognized stroke care during the crucial time period when treatment is needed for a patient of an ischemic stroke, or clot in one of the brain's blood vessels. [More]
Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single people

People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. [More]
Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Marriage is criticized for many things — justly and unjustly — but not heart disease, according to findings of a recent study conducted by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Marital status affects risk of heart disease, survey shows

Analysis of surveys of more than 3.5 million American men and women, administered at some 20,000 health centers across the country - believed to be the largest analysis of its kind ever performed - found that married people, regardless of age, sex, or even cardiovascular risk factors, had significantly less chances of having any kind of cardiovascular disease than those who were single, divorced or widowed. [More]

NYSS affiliates with International Journal of Surgery to access important research

The New York Surgical Society (NYSS) has decided to affiliate with the International Journal of Surgery in an agreement that gives members of the Society easy access to the important research published by the journal and marks the growth in the journal's international reach. [More]
Loyola surgeon successfully performs operation on patient suffering from rare disorder

Loyola surgeon successfully performs operation on patient suffering from rare disorder

Jarely Sanchez is an affectionate, energetic little girl who loves ballet. "Everyone she meets, she connects with," said her father, Jose Angel Ulloa. "She's like a magnet." But for more than a week, the three-year-old girl wasn't herself. [More]
Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Angry outbursts increase heart attack risk

Call it what you will - getting red in the face, hot under the collar, losing your cool, blowing your top - we all experience anger. And while we know that anger is a normal, sometimes even beneficial emotion, we're also aware of the often harmful connection between anger and health. New research from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical shows an even more compelling reason to think about getting anger in check - a nearly fivefold increase in risk for heart attack in the two hours following outbursts of anger. [More]
New imaging technique can predict common congenital heart abnormality

New imaging technique can predict common congenital heart abnormality

A new imaging technique for measuring blood flow in the heart and vessels can diagnose a common congenital heart abnormality, bicuspid aortic valve, and may lead to better prediction of complications. [More]
New AAA screening program reduces number of undiagnosed at-risk men by more than 50%

New AAA screening program reduces number of undiagnosed at-risk men by more than 50%

A screening program for abdominal aortic aneurysms, integrated into an electronic health record, dramatically reduced the number of unscreened at-risk men by more than 50 percent within 15 months, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of Vascular Surgery. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a balloon-like bulge in the aorta, which - if ruptured - can result in death. [More]
Beaumont Health System use new balloon ablation technology to treat atrial fibrillation

Beaumont Health System use new balloon ablation technology to treat atrial fibrillation

Beaumont Health System is the first center outside of Japan to use a new balloon ablation technology to treat atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder that affects about 3 million people in the U.S. [More]
Temple University Hospital to test multilayer stent in patients suffering from aortic aneurysm

Temple University Hospital to test multilayer stent in patients suffering from aortic aneurysm

Temple University Hospital (TUH) could be among the first U.S.-based hospitals to test a new device known as a multilayer stent in patients suffering from aortic aneurysm, a condition characterized by the formation of a potentially life-threatening bulge in the aorta. [More]
ASA's recommendations to help patients avoid unnecessary tests for chronic pain

ASA's recommendations to help patients avoid unnecessary tests for chronic pain

Not prescribing opioids first or as a long-term therapy for chronic, non-cancer pain and avoiding MRIs, CTs and X-rays for low-back pain are among the tests and treatments identified by ASA that are commonly ordered but not always necessary. [More]
THRIL could be novel biomarker for immune activation, potential target for inflammatory diseases

THRIL could be novel biomarker for immune activation, potential target for inflammatory diseases

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute scientists have discovered a new molecule that forms when certain white blood cells-macrophages-are stimulated in response to pathogens. [More]

Patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome at increased risk for aortic aneurysm

Patients with the connective tissue disorder Loeys-Dietz syndrome are at high risk for aortic aneurysm. LDS results in the presence of missense mutations within either of the genes encoding receptors for TGF-β. LDS-associated mutations are predicted to reduce TGF-β signaling; however, aortic tissue samples from LDS patients indicate that TGF-β signaling may be enhanced. [More]
Reverse Medical's BARREL Vascular Reconstruction Device gets CE Mark approval

Reverse Medical's BARREL Vascular Reconstruction Device gets CE Mark approval

Reverse Medical Corporation today announced CE Mark approval for European commercialization of their BARREL Vascular Reconstruction Device and the first European clinical case. The BARREL Vascular Reconstruction Device is intended for use with occlusive devices in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. [More]