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In angioplasty procedures, a balloon is fed through a catheter and used to prop open an artery that has become narrowed or blocked. In cases where stenting is appropriate, a stent mounted on a balloon is inserted and inflation of the balloon expands the stent against the blocked artery wall to hold the vessel open. The balloon is then deflated and the catheter is withdrawn. Stent treatment of arteries holds them open and improves blood flow to the heart. In cases where post-dilatation is needed, a high-pressure balloon is inflated inside a stent to help better place the stent against the vessel wall.
Type 2 diabetes screening followed by treatment could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, death

Type 2 diabetes screening followed by treatment could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, death

Screening to identify Type 2 diabetes followed by early treatment could result in substantial health benefits, according to new research published today in Diabetes Care that combined large scale clinical observations and innovative computer modelling. [More]
Elderly cardiac patients receive less evidence-based treatment compared to younger patients

Elderly cardiac patients receive less evidence-based treatment compared to younger patients

People in their 80s and 90s are more likely to develop acute coronary syndrome than their younger counterparts. Despite this, they receive less therapy and diagnostic procedures. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has explored the topic. [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS collaborate to improve quality of care for Michiganians

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS collaborate to improve quality of care for Michiganians

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and the University of Michigan Health System will collaborate with emergency physicians at participating hospitals across the state to develop best practices to improve the experience and outcomes of patients receiving care in emergency departments. [More]
Contego Medical announces completion of $5.6 million Series B financing round

Contego Medical announces completion of $5.6 million Series B financing round

Contego Medical, the first and only provider of the Integrated Embolic Protection filter platform for angioplasty balloon and stent delivery catheters, announces the completion of a $5.6 million Series B financing round led by Hatteras Venture Partners, an early stage venture firm with a focus on medical devices, biopharmaceuticals, diagnostics and related opportunities in human medicine. [More]
VIVA physician selected as new Fellows in the Society of Interventional Radiology

VIVA physician selected as new Fellows in the Society of Interventional Radiology

Dr. John D. Statler, a board-certified, fellowship-trained Interventional Radiologist with Virginia Interventional & Vascular Associates, is one of only 23 physicians nationwide selected this year as new Fellows in the Society of Interventional Radiology. [More]
Use of balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy increases stroke risk

Use of balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy increases stroke risk

Among patients with symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis (narrowing of an artery inside the brain), the use of a balloon-expandable stent compared with medical therapy (clopidogrel and aspirin) resulted in an increased of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), according to a study in the March 24/31 issue of JAMA. [More]
Anticoagulant drug bivalirudin shows mixed results in MATRIX trial

Anticoagulant drug bivalirudin shows mixed results in MATRIX trial

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing angioplasty who received the anticoagulant drug bivalirudin did not show significant improvements in either of two co-primary endpoints--a composite of rate of death, heart attack or stroke at 30 days, or a composite of those events plus major bleeding--as compared to patients receiving standard anticoagulation therapy, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Using arm as access point for catheter-based heart procedures lowers risk of major bleeding, death

Patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary angiogram, a procedure used to assess blockages in the heart's arteries, had a significantly lower risk of major bleeding and death if their interventional cardiologist accessed the heart through an artery in the arm rather than the groin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

New anti-clotting therapy no better than established anticoagulants

A novel therapy that would allow doctors to turn the body's blood-clotting ability off and on in a more controlled way was about as effective as established anticoagulants in patients undergoing angioplasty but was associated with higher rates of moderate to severe bleeding, according to an analysis of data from a terminated Phase III trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Patients who experience deadliest form of heart attack may benefit from angioplasty

Patients who experience the deadliest form of heart attack--ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)--and suffer from substantial narrowing in multiple heart arteries may benefit from receiving angioplasty in constricted arteries not affected by the heart attack, thereby reducing the need for future angioplasty, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

New drug fails to prevent irreversible injury to the heart after angioplasty

Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Routine use of thrombectomy in heart attack patients may increase risk of stroke

Routine use of thrombectomy in heart attack patients may increase risk of stroke

The largest study ever of its kind, led by researchers from McMaster University and the University of Toronto, has found that a routine strategy of blood clot removal during treatment for heart attacks was not beneficial and was associated with an increased risk of stroke. [More]
Study: Remote ischemic preconditioning not effective in improving heart bypass outcomes

Study: Remote ischemic preconditioning not effective in improving heart bypass outcomes

Patients who underwent a simple conditioning procedure involving the inflation and deflation of a blood pressure cuff on the upper arm before coronary artery bypass grafting, known as heart bypass surgery, had no better long-term health outcomes than bypass patients who did not receive the conditioning, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego. [More]
Patients with multiple narrowed arteries have better outcomes with CABG than with PCI

Patients with multiple narrowed arteries have better outcomes with CABG than with PCI

Despite the advent of a new generation of stents, patients with multiple narrowed arteries in the heart who received coronary artery bypass grafting fared better than those whose arteries were opened with balloon angioplasty and stents in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Loyola gets AHA grant for cardiac research

Loyola gets AHA grant for cardiac research

The American Heart Association awarded Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine $735,516 in 2014 in new and continuing grants for cardiac research. [More]
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS announce new initiative to enhance genetic testing practices

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS announce new initiative to enhance genetic testing practices

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and the University of Michigan Health System are collaborating with physicians and laboratories across the state as part of a new initiative to improve genetic testing practices. [More]
Duke researchers find major shift in treatments for peripheral artery disease

Duke researchers find major shift in treatments for peripheral artery disease

Federal efforts to curb Medicare costs for unclogging blood vessels in the limbs slowed the growing use of the treatments, but also coincided with a marked increase in doctors using a more expensive approach, according to an analysis by Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

Decades of progress save countless lives, but biggest research challenges lie ahead

The 2015 Heart and Stroke Foundation Report on the Health of Canadians looks back on 60 years of life-saving, ground-breaking research, revealing astonishing improvements in diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. [More]
Scripps Green Hospital treats peripheral artery disease patient using new drug-coated balloon

Scripps Green Hospital treats peripheral artery disease patient using new drug-coated balloon

A doctor at Scripps Green Hospital this week became the first in California to use a new drug-coated balloon to treat peripheral artery disease in a patient since regulatory approval of the IN.PACT Admiral device in January by the Food and Drug Administration. [More]
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