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Anthocyanins are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that may appear red, purple, or blue according to pH. They belong to a parent class of molecules called flavonoids synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway. Anthocyanins occur in all tissues of higher plants, including leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Anthoxanthins are their clear, white to yellow counterparts occurring in plants. Anthocyanins are derivatives of anthocyanidins which include pendant sugars.

Anthocyanins are powerful antioxidants in vitro. This antioxidant property may be conserved even after the plant which produced the anthocyanin is consumed by another organism, possibly explaining why fruits and vegetables with colorful skins and pulp are considered nutritious. Research continues to be underway as to the potential range of health benefits from anthocyanins.

Comprehensive analysis of anthocyanin in regional and global markets

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Anthocyanin (CAS 13329-14-1) Market Research Report" report to their offering. [More]
Antioxidant in strawberries may help control cholesterol in blood, says study

Antioxidant in strawberries may help control cholesterol in blood, says study

A team of volunteers ate half a kilo of strawberries a day for a month to see whether it altered their blood parameters in any way. At the end of this unusual treatment, their levels of bad cholesterol and triglycerides reduced significantly, according to the analyses conducted by Italian and Spanish scientists. [More]
Look to heart shaped foods to protect heart

Look to heart shaped foods to protect heart

The crumbs from the Christmas cookies are gone and black-eyed peas, eaten on New Year to bring luck, are a distant memory. Declared American Heart Month with Valentine's Day smack dab in the middle, February is here. What to eat to keep your heart healthy? [More]
Prairie fruits hold promise as important source of nutrients for local and global populations

Prairie fruits hold promise as important source of nutrients for local and global populations

​Researchers working at the University of Saskatchewan have discovered new potential in prairie fruits, in particular, buffaloberry, chokecherry and sea buckthorn, according to a new study published today in the Canadian Journal of Plant Science. [More]

Tomatoes made more tasty and longer-lasting with purple GM varieties

Tomatoes, said to be the world's most popular fruit, can be made both better-tasting and longer-lasting thanks to UK research with purple GM varieties. [More]
Eight ways to say ‘I love you’ from Loyola dietitian

Eight ways to say ‘I love you’ from Loyola dietitian

If you want to keep your true love's heart beating strong, Susan Ofria, clinical nutrition manager at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, said the real food of love is dark chocolate and red wine. In moderation, red wine and dark chocolate are good health choices not just on Valentine's Day, but for any occasion. [More]
Berries help women beat heart attack risk

Berries help women beat heart attack risk

Regular consumption of anthocyanin-rich strawberries and blueberries may help prevent heart attacks in young women, suggest study findings. [More]
Berry wines may help people with diabetes decrease their blood sugar

Berry wines may help people with diabetes decrease their blood sugar

In evaluating the bioactive compounds of Illinois blueberry and blackberry wines, University of Illinois scientists have found compounds that inhibit enzymes responsible for carbohydrate absorption and assimilation. And that could mean a tasty way to help people with diabetes decrease their blood sugar. [More]

Study determines why blood oranges develop anthocyanin pigments

The anthocyanin pigments that provide the "blood" color of blood oranges are not produced in significant amounts unless the fruit is exposed to cold conditions during its development or post-harvest. No cold exposure means poor anthocyanin production and the loss of the entire crop. This means that blood oranges can be grown in many areas of the world, but they are most likely to be exposed to the correct temperature conditions in only a few regions, including their major area of production in Sicily. [More]
New research could make it easier to grow health-promoting blood oranges

New research could make it easier to grow health-promoting blood oranges

For the red pigmentation to develop, blood oranges normally require a period of cold as they ripen. The only place to reliably grow them on a commercial scale is in the Sicilian area of Italy around Mount Etna. Here, the combination of sun and cold/sunny days and warm nights provides ideal growing conditions. [More]

Red wine and dark chocolate are the real food of love

Forget the oysters and the champagne this Valentine's Day. If you want to keep your true love's heart beating strong, Susan Ofria, clinical nutrition manager at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, said the real food of love is dark chocolate and red wine. [More]
Spoonful of black rice bran contains more health promoting anthocyanin antioxidants than blueberries

Spoonful of black rice bran contains more health promoting anthocyanin antioxidants than blueberries

Health conscious consumers who hesitate at the price of fresh blueberries and blackberries, fruits renowned for high levels of healthful antioxidants, now have an economical alternative, scientists reported here today at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. It is black rice, one variety of which got the moniker "Forbidden Rice" in ancient China because nobles commandeered every grain for themselves and forbade the common people from eating it. [More]
Research report: Development of Chinese blueberry extract industry

Research report: Development of Chinese blueberry extract industry

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Research Report of Chinese Blueberry Extract Market, 2009-2010 [More]

Specially bred purple sweet potato with anti-cancer components

A Kansas State University researcher is studying the potential health benefits of a specially bred purple sweet potato because its dominant purple color results in an increased amount of anti-cancer components. [More]

Black raspberries have chemopreventive potential

A study published in Cancer Prevention Research , a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, identifies components of black raspberries with chemopreventive potential. [More]
Purple tomatoes the latest in the arsenal against cancer

Purple tomatoes the latest in the arsenal against cancer

British scientists have developed purple tomatoes which they believe may possibly help fight cancer. [More]

A polyphenols-rich diet keeps the heart younger

This finding comes out from a study by the University of Grenoble in collaboration with the other Centres participating to the FLORA Project, a European Commission funded research studying the effects of flavonoids, a variety of polyphenols, on human health. [More]

New proposed monographs for dietary supplements

The U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) is pleased to announce 11 new proposed monographs for dietary supplements for public notice and comment. [More]

Red and blue fruits and veggies the best for fighting cancer

A new study by scientists in the U.S. has found that red and blue foods are the best when it comes to fighting cancer. [More]

Compound found in elderberry could give a natural boost to skin

Forget expensive moisturisers and cosmetic surgery, a compound found in the humble elderberry could give a natural boost to skin. [More]