Anti Inflammatory News and Research RSS Feed - Anti Inflammatory News and Research

Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer's, but in a counterintuitive finding reported in a new paper, University of Florida researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease. [More]
AHS provides updated assessment of treatments for acute migraine

AHS provides updated assessment of treatments for acute migraine

The January issue of the American Headache Society journal Headache provides an updated assessment of the best treatments to use when a migraine attack occurs. The assessment will form the basis of new AHS treatment guidelines. [More]
QMUL researchers develop new 'microcapsule' method to treat osteoarthritis

QMUL researchers develop new 'microcapsule' method to treat osteoarthritis

A new 'microcapsule' treatment delivery method developed by researchers at Queen Mary University of London could reduce inflammation in cartilage affected by osteoarthritis and reverse damage to tissue. The research was funded by Arthritis Research UK and the AO Foundation. [More]
Study: Stem cells derived from human female amnion have anti-inflammatory effects

Study: Stem cells derived from human female amnion have anti-inflammatory effects

Stem cells derived from human amnion have for some time been considered promising for cell therapies because of their ease of access, ability to differentiate, and absence of ethical issues. [More]
Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

A natural protein made by immune cells may limit fibrosis and scarring in colitis, according to research published in the inaugural issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
GSU researchers discover how steroids use a novel 'trick' to suppress inflammation

GSU researchers discover how steroids use a novel 'trick' to suppress inflammation

A new "trick" steroids use to suppress inflammation, which could be used to make new anti-inflammatory drugs without the harmful side effects of steroids, has been discovered by researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
TSRI researchers identify enzyme that produces inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain

TSRI researchers identify enzyme that produces inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has identified an enzyme that produces a class of inflammatory lipid molecules in the brain. Abnormally high levels of these molecules appear to cause a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, and that disorder now may be treatable if researchers can develop suitable drug candidates that inhibit this enzyme. [More]
Some medicines can make skin sun-sensitive, says NPS MedicineWise clinical adviser

Some medicines can make skin sun-sensitive, says NPS MedicineWise clinical adviser

Some medicines can make your skin more sensitive to the sun and this summer season NPS MedicineWise advises Australians to check their medicines packaging for warnings to avoid excessive skin exposure to sunlight and sunlamps. [More]
Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo receives FDA approval for SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets

Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved SAVAYSA (edoxaban) Tablets, an oral, once-daily selective factor Xa-inhibitor, to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism (SE) in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]
Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Improving headache treatment could reduce health care spending, new study suggests

Each year more than 12 million Americans visit their doctors complaining of headaches, which result in lost productivity and costs of upward of $31 billion annually. A new study by researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests some of that cost could be offset by physicians ordering fewer tests and an increased focus on counseling about lifestyle changes. [More]
FDA approves Hospira's Dyloject (diclofenac sodium) Injection for pain management

FDA approves Hospira's Dyloject (diclofenac sodium) Injection for pain management

Hospira, Inc., the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, and a global leader in biosimilars, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Dyloject (diclofenac sodium) Injection, a proprietary nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) analgesic. [More]
Study: Fear of terrorism, existential anxiety increase pulse rate and risk of death

Study: Fear of terrorism, existential anxiety increase pulse rate and risk of death

A new study of over 17,000 Israelis has found that long-term exposure to the threat of terrorism can elevate people's resting heart rates and increase their risk of dying. [More]
Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

Study: Inactivating polymorphism may influence progression of ovarian and luminal breast cancer

A common polymorphism - a variation in a person's DNA sequence that is found with regularity in the general population - can lead to a chain of events that dictates how a tumor will progress in certain types of cancer, including a form of breast cancer as well as ovarian cancer, according to new research from The Wistar Institute that was published online by the journal Cancer Cell. [More]
Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

Gene variations predispose mestizo Mexican population to develop severe form of COPD

A study by Ramcés Falfán-Valencia, researcher at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases, found that the mestizo Mexican population has a number of variations in certain genes that predispose them to develop the most severe form of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
ARA 290 drug reduces neuropathic pain in type 2 diabetic patients

ARA 290 drug reduces neuropathic pain in type 2 diabetic patients

Molecular Medicine, a peer-reviewed biomedical journal published by the Feinstein Institute Press, published the results of a new study reporting clinically significant pain reduction in type 2 diabetic patients. In an exploratory study conducted by Araim Pharmaceuticals, a biotech company developing novel treatments for chronic diseases, investigators also observed improvements in metabolic control in patients administered ARA 290. [More]
Dr. Shirin Towfigh reveals possible symptoms that may help identify sports hernias

Dr. Shirin Towfigh reveals possible symptoms that may help identify sports hernias

When playing sports that involve rapid bursts, twists, and movements, a variety of groin injuries, including hernias, can occur. No matter how strong or flexible someone is, their lower abdominal wall can still weaken because of constant or particularly straining rapid movement. [More]
Crealta publishes review of post-hoc safety analysis completed for Krystexxa

Crealta publishes review of post-hoc safety analysis completed for Krystexxa

Crealta Pharmaceuticals LLC, today announced that the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology published a comprehensive review of a post-hoc safety analysis that was completed for Krystexxa (pegloticase), including data from the two pivotal randomized Phase III trials and one open-label extension trial. [More]
Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Brunel scientists find way to target hard-to-reach cancers using 'Trojan horse' nanoparticles

Scientists at Brunel University London have found a way of targeting hard-to-reach cancers and degenerative diseases using nanoparticles, but without causing the damaging side effects the treatment normally brings. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate Orally Disintegrating Tablets

Mylan announces U.S. launch of Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate Orally Disintegrating Tablets

Mylan Inc. today announced the U.S. launch of its Prednisolone Sodium Phosphate Orally Disintegrating Tablets, 10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg. This product is the first generic version of Shionogi's Orapred ODT. [More]