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Migraine increases vascular disease risk in women

Migraine increases vascular disease risk in women

Women with migraine have a 50% increased risk of major cardiovascular disease, suggests a cohort study of Nurses' Health Study II participants. [More]
Vital compound in common anti-inflammatory drugs can combat cancer, inflammation

Vital compound in common anti-inflammatory drugs can combat cancer, inflammation

Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have identified a new pathway by which salicylic acid--a key compound in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and diflunisal--stops inflammation and cancer. [More]
Organic chemists succeed in synthesizing 3,6-Dihydro-2H-pyran derivatives with high enantiomeric purity

Organic chemists succeed in synthesizing 3,6-Dihydro-2H-pyran derivatives with high enantiomeric purity

The pyran ring is present in so many useful compounds, such as pharmaceuticals (antibiotics, anti-infectives, cardiovascular agents, neurological modulators, anti-allergic, anti-asthmatic, anti-inflammatory agents, reproductive and genitourinary agents, growth promoters and antidiabetic agents), veterinary products, agrochemicals, toxins, polymers and additives, photosensitizers and photoinitiators, surfactants, food products, dyes and pigments. [More]
Common pain and anti-inflammation drugs may slow cancer growth

Common pain and anti-inflammation drugs may slow cancer growth

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have found that one of the most widely prescribed pain and anti-inflammation drugs slows the growth rate of a specific kind of cancer in animal models and suggests the medication could have the same effect on other types of tumors. [More]
Too much of sun exposure may cause hangover

Too much of sun exposure may cause hangover

Summer is preparing to make its debut in a few weeks, and along with it, most of us will flock to the outdoors to soak up sunshine and Vitamin D. [More]
Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Personalized DXM-loaded leukosomes may help treat inflammation

Nanosized Trojan horses created from a patient's own immune cells have successfully treated inflammation by overcoming the body's complex defense mechanisms, perhaps leading to broader applications for treating diseases characterized by inflammation, such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases. [More]
Transplanted human stool may offer treatment hope for ulcerative colitis patients

Transplanted human stool may offer treatment hope for ulcerative colitis patients

Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) may improve their symptoms with a transplantation of healthy stool from donors, according to Australian researchers. The findings were presented by Dr Sudarchan Paramsothy MD, a gastroenterologist from the University of New South Wales, Australia at the Digestive Disease Week conference in San Diego, California between the 21st to 24th May. [More]
New method helps scavenge inflammatory molecules that mediate sepsis in mice

New method helps scavenge inflammatory molecules that mediate sepsis in mice

Sepsis is a life-threatening complication of infection in which the molecules that the body releases to fight an infection trigger widespread inflammatory responses, resulting in damage to multiple organ systems. [More]
Simple tips to reduce pain from sunburn

Simple tips to reduce pain from sunburn

The British Skin Foundation has sun safety tips available to the public on this page and our primary advice is to follow these to avoid sunburn in the first place. However, we realise that sometimes accidents can happen. [More]
CML treatment-free remission criteria outlined

CML treatment-free remission criteria outlined

Treatment-free remission may be feasible in many patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia, say researchers who set out clinical and logistical requirements for discontinuing tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. [More]
Study links multiple sclerosis in children to abundance of specific gut bacteria

Study links multiple sclerosis in children to abundance of specific gut bacteria

In a recent study, children with multiple sclerosis had differences in the abundance of specific gut bacteria than children without the disease. Certain types of bacteria were either more or less abundant in children with multiple sclerosis. [More]
Combination of COX-2-selective NSAID with PPI can reduce risk of stomach, intestinal ulcers

Combination of COX-2-selective NSAID with PPI can reduce risk of stomach, intestinal ulcers

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)—including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and others—are commonly used pain medications that are generally safe but may increase the risk of developing stomach and intestinal ulcers. [More]
Potential new intraocular treatment based on RAS manipulation can prevent or reverse diabetic retinopathy

Potential new intraocular treatment based on RAS manipulation can prevent or reverse diabetic retinopathy

Pathologic changes of the retina caused by diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working adults. Diabetic retinopathy has no known cure, treatment options are inadequate, and prevention strategies offer limited protection. In the first of its kind, a report in The American Journal of Pathology describes a potential new intraocular treatment based on manipulating the renin angiotensin system (RAS) that both prevents and reverses some characteristics of diabetic retinopathy in a mouse model. [More]
Caltech researchers discover new potential cause for Crohn's disease

Caltech researchers discover new potential cause for Crohn's disease

The community of beneficial bacteria that live in our intestines, known as the gut microbiome, are important for the development and function of the immune system. There has been growing evidence that certain probiotics--therapies that introduce beneficial bacteria into the gut--may help alleviate some of the symptoms of intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease. [More]
Drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice can reduce early signs of hypertension

Drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice can reduce early signs of hypertension

Drinking tart Montmorency cherry juice significantly reduces high blood pressure at a level comparable to that achieved by medication, according to new research from Northumbria University, Newcastle. [More]
Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain. A small, preliminary University of Florida Health study has suggested for the first time that inflammation may occur more quickly and at a higher magnitude -- and stays around longer -- when older adults experience pain versus when younger adults experience pain. [More]
Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Giving daily doses of statins for a few days before and after heart surgery does not prevent heart muscle damage or the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an international clinical trial led by the University of Oxford and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
Oral administration of Jakinibs reduces Parkinson's disease pathogenesis in rat model

Oral administration of Jakinibs reduces Parkinson's disease pathogenesis in rat model

University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers report the first documentation that suppressing a key cell-signaling pathway in a rat model of Parkinson's disease reduces pathogenesis. Oral administration of AZD1480 — one of the JAK/STAT pathway inhibitors generally known as Jakinibs — lessened the destructive inflammation and nerve cell degradation in the area of the brain affected by Parkinson's. [More]
Scientists unveil reasons why NSAIDs, pain killers may increase heart disease risk

Scientists unveil reasons why NSAIDs, pain killers may increase heart disease risk

Researchers have known for more than a decade that the risk of heart disease and stroke increases when people take pain relievers like ibuprofen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. Now, scientists from the University of California, Davis, have uncovered some of the reasons why these drugs can harm heart tissue. [More]
Bacterial invasion of lungs can lead to inflammation in COPD

Bacterial invasion of lungs can lead to inflammation in COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common smoking-related lung illness and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Scientists have long believed that inhaling toxic gases and particles from tobacco smoke causes inflammation of the small airways in the lungs, leading to the development of COPD. However, the theory doesn't explain why airway inflammation and disease progression continue even after the patient stops smoking. [More]
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