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HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

HSS researchers launch new study to find if stem cell treatment could help people with knee arthritis

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have launched a study to determine if a treatment using stem cells could help people with painful knee arthritis. [More]
Review highlights beneficial health effects of cranberries

Review highlights beneficial health effects of cranberries

While decades of cranberry research has found that regular consumption of cranberry products promotes urinary tract health, leading scientists studying the bioactive components of fruits and other foods reported that cranberries possess whole body health benefits. [More]
Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

Scientists develop new way to resurface arthritic hip joint

With a goal of treating worn, arthritic hips without extensive surgery to replace them, scientists have programmed stem cells to grow new cartilage on a 3-D template shaped like the ball of a hip joint. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to subset of ALS, say researchers

Harvard Stem Cell Institute researchers at Harvard University and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT have found evidence that bone marrow transplantation may one day be beneficial to a subset of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. [More]
Scientists discover novel genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of femoral head

Scientists discover novel genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of femoral head

Scientists at the Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre have discovered a new genetic mutation linked to osteonecrosis of the hip, specifically the femoral head - the spherical-shaped mass at the top of the femur. [More]
Manipulation of gut microbes can reverse negative effects of high fat diet, researchers find

Manipulation of gut microbes can reverse negative effects of high fat diet, researchers find

Did you know that your gut sends neural messages to the brain to tell it when it is full? Researchers at the University of Georgia, Binghamton University, and Pennsylvania State University have now found that chronic consumption of high fat foods disturbs these neural messages in rats by shifting the populations of bacteria that ordinarily reside inside the gut. [More]
Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

Cryopreserved human umbilical cord patch shows promise in treating fetal spina bifida

A patch made from cryopreserved human umbilical cord may be a novel method for treating spina bifida in utero, according to researchers at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Based on a study of 85 Gulf War veterans, Veterans Affairs researchers in Minneapolis have developed a tentative panel of blood markers they say can verify a diagnosis of Gulf War Illness with 90 percent accuracy. [More]
New study suggests potential role for gut microbiota in diabetes remission after bypass surgery

New study suggests potential role for gut microbiota in diabetes remission after bypass surgery

Studies have shown that bariatric surgery can lead to remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in rodents and humans, but this beneficial effect cannot be explained solely by weight loss. [More]
Scientists develop new online open-access data tool to improve drug safety

Scientists develop new online open-access data tool to improve drug safety

A new online open-access database has been developed by scientists to allow the clinical responses of more than 5 million patients to all FDA-approved drugs to be used to identify unexpected clinical harm, benefits and alternative treatment choices for individual patients, according to a study appearing July 8 in Nature Biotechnology. [More]
Buck researchers find new way for possible treatment of AMD

Buck researchers find new way for possible treatment of AMD

Buck researchers boosted the potency of a broccoli-related compound by ten times and identified it as a possible treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss affecting more than 10 million older Americans. [More]
Existing anti-inflammatory drugs may be effective in treating epilepsy

Existing anti-inflammatory drugs may be effective in treating epilepsy

In epileptic patients, seizures lead to an increased level of inflammation-related proteins called chemokines in the brain, and systemic inflammation likely helps trigger and promote the recurrence of seizures, making inflammation a promising new target for anticonvulsant therapy. [More]
Itaconate can suppress pro-inflammatory activity of macrophages

Itaconate can suppress pro-inflammatory activity of macrophages

An international group of scientists from US, Canada, Germany and Russia has revealed a substance produced in humans that can suppress the pro-inflammatory activity of macrophages - specific cells of immune system. [More]
Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Scientists detect biological markers of chronic fatigue syndrome in gut bacteria

Physicians have been mystified by chronic fatigue syndrome, a condition where normal exertion leads to debilitating fatigue that isn't alleviated by rest. There are no known triggers, and diagnosis requires lengthy tests administered by an expert. [More]
Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a condition mostly observed in older patients following surgery under general anesthesia, is characterized by impaired memory and concentration. The impairment may be temporary or permanent and incapacitating. [More]
Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Rituximab may be an attractive treatment option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest phase II study findings showing its efficacy in controlling inflammatory activity. [More]
Drexel University researchers aim to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in chronic pain

Drexel University researchers aim to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in chronic pain

Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent, disabling and expensive public health crises in the United States. It affects more than 100 million Americans, with annual costs estimated at $635 billion, says a 2014 report from the American Pain Society. [More]
Inflammatory response to mosquito bites can help spread viral infections

Inflammatory response to mosquito bites can help spread viral infections

Mosquito bite sites are not just itchy, irritating nuisances - they also make viral infections spread by the insects far worse, new research has found. [More]
Food allergies linked to diet and gut microbiome

Food allergies linked to diet and gut microbiome

The development of food allergies in mice can be linked to what their gut bacteria are being fed, reports a study published June 21 in Cell Reports. Rodents that received a diet with average calories, sugar, and fiber content from birth were shown to have more severe peanut allergies than those that received a high-fiber diet. [More]
Cardiac surgery patients who received omega-3 supplementation experience reduced hospital stays

Cardiac surgery patients who received omega-3 supplementation experience reduced hospital stays

A new meta-analysis published in Clinical Nutrition found that cardiac surgery patients who received omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (compared to placebo) in advance of surgery experienced reduced postoperative cardiac arrhythmias and significantly reduced the length of hospital stay by up to 2.4 days. The results are based on 11 RCT's with 1038 patients. [More]
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