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Study identifies best course of treatment for endophthalmitis

Study identifies best course of treatment for endophthalmitis

The most common cause of endophthalmitis, a potentially blinding condition that can occur after eye trauma, eye surgery, and eye injections, are the well-known staphylococci ("staph") and streptococci ("strep") bacterial strains, according to a study published in the August issue of Ophthalmology and based on a review of 25 years of cases at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai (NYEE). [More]
Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants. [More]
MRSA and antibiotic resistance is a major health threat

MRSA and antibiotic resistance is a major health threat

Antibiotic resistance continues at an alarming rate with the indiscriminate overuse of antibiotics given to humans and animals. [More]
Researchers discover highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of pathogen in Ohio

Researchers discover highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of pathogen in Ohio

A team of clinician researchers has discovered a highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of the pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in patient samples in Ohio. [More]
TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the acquisition of a group of novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Atlanta, GA. [More]
Exposure of pregnant women and fetuses to antibacterial compounds leads to health risk

Exposure of pregnant women and fetuses to antibacterial compounds leads to health risk

As the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mulls over whether to rein in the use of common antibacterial compounds that are causing growing concern among environmental health experts, scientists are reporting today that many pregnant women and their fetuses are being exposed to these substances. [More]
Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists at Duke University report. [More]
Viewpoints: GOP lawsuit against Obama on health law is not a 'stunt'; 'wisdom' lacking in the House; the danger of cyberattacks on hospitals

Viewpoints: GOP lawsuit against Obama on health law is not a 'stunt'; 'wisdom' lacking in the House; the danger of cyberattacks on hospitals

"So sue me" is President Obama's message to Congress. And on Wednesday the House of Representatives took up his taunt, authorizing a lawsuit to challenge the president's failure to faithfully execute provisions of the Affordable Care Act as passed by Congress. The House lawsuit is no "stunt," as Mr. Obama has characterized it. [More]
Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

About 100 drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other purposes can also prevent the growth of certain bacterial pathogens inside human cells, including those that cause Legionnaires' disease, brucellosis, and Mediterranean spotted fever. [More]
Continuous antibiotics for children with antenatal hydronephrosis not necessary, study finds

Continuous antibiotics for children with antenatal hydronephrosis not necessary, study finds

Up to 5 percent of all prenatal ultrasounds uncover antenatal hydronephrosis, or enlarged kidneys, the most commonly detected prenatal abnormality in the United States. Many children with this abnormality are treated continually with preventive antibiotics for the first few years of life with the hopes of preventing the condition's associated urinary tract infections. [More]
Funding for antibiotic research in the UK are inadequate, study reveals

Funding for antibiotic research in the UK are inadequate, study reveals

Less than 1% of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008–13 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. [More]
Current recommendations advise prompt antiviral treatment for high-risk patients with influenza

Current recommendations advise prompt antiviral treatment for high-risk patients with influenza

Patients likely to benefit the most from antiviral therapy for influenza were prescribed these drugs infrequently during the 2012-2013 influenza season, while antibiotics may have been overprescribed. [More]
Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Antibiotic resistance is depleting our arsenal against deadly diseases and infections, such as tuberculosis and Staph infections, but recent research shows promise to speed up the drug discovery process. [More]
CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR system involved in promoting antibiotic resistance

CRISPR, a system of genes that bacteria use to fend off viruses, is involved in promoting antibiotic resistance in Francisella novicida, a close relative of the bacterium that causes tularemia. [More]

Study results may lead to new approach for treatment of chronic ear infections in children

Researchers from the University of Southern California and the Oak Crest Institute of Science have discovered the link between antibiotics and bacterial biofilm formation leading to chronic lung, sinus and ear infections. The study results, published in the current issue of PLOS ONE, illustrate how bacterial biofilms can actually thrive, rather than decrease, when given low doses of antibiotics. [More]
NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

NIAID launches CRS3123 Phase I trial to treat C. difficile infection

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched an early-stage clinical trial of CRS3123, an investigational oral antibiotic intended to treat Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection. [More]
Antibiotic treatment for patients who underwent gall bladder removal does not reduce infection risk

Antibiotic treatment for patients who underwent gall bladder removal does not reduce infection risk

Among patients who underwent gall bladder removal for acute calculous cholecystitis, lack of postoperative antibiotic treatment did not result in a greater incidence of infections, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA. [More]
New research unit to uncover multi-drug resistant bacteria in hospitals

New research unit to uncover multi-drug resistant bacteria in hospitals

Multi-drug resistant bacteria have increased dramatically in hospitals in recent years and present immense challenges to staff and patients, often with fatal results. [More]
DFG to establish five new Research Units to pursue current issues in research areas

DFG to establish five new Research Units to pursue current issues in research areas

The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) is establishing five new Research Units. [More]
Research roundup: 20M gain insurance, coverage's effect on surgery choices; opioid use by service members

Research roundup: 20M gain insurance, coverage's effect on surgery choices; opioid use by service members

This report aims to help readers understand recently announced enrollment numbers, as well as other numbers that have received less attention, and assess their importance for the future of the ACA and our health care system. . [More]