Antibody News and Research RSS Feed - Antibody News and Research

An antibody is a blood protein that is produced in response to and counteracts an antigen. Antibodies are produced in response to disease and help the body fight against the particular disease. In this way, antibodies help the body develop an immunity to disease.
Researchers shed light on mechanism for inducing memory B cell differentiation

Researchers shed light on mechanism for inducing memory B cell differentiation

A group of researchers at Immunology Frontier Research Center (IFReC), Osaka University and RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences jointly clarified the mechanism for inducing germinal-center B cells' differentiation into memory B cells, immune cells that remember antigens, at the molecular level. [More]
UCI molecular biologists find new way to combat skin cancer

UCI molecular biologists find new way to combat skin cancer

Using new and innovative immune-therapeutic approaches to silence "don't eat me" signaling proteins recognized by specialized cells of the immune system, University of California, Irvine molecular biologists and their colleagues have identified an effective way to combat metastatic melanoma. [More]
New research opens door to influencing immune system

New research opens door to influencing immune system

A new international collaboration involving scientists at The Scripps Research Institute opens a door to influencing the immune system, which would be useful to boost the effectiveness of vaccines or to counter autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Overcoming gene silencing barriers to target neurological conditions: an interview with Dr Errol de Souza

Overcoming gene silencing barriers to target neurological conditions: an interview with Dr Errol de Souza

Many gene mutations that cause neurological disorders have been identified. For example, in a rare neurological disorder such as Huntington’s disease, an autosomal dominant mutation through expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats in the gene coding for the Huntingtin protein results in abnormal protein production. [More]
Researchers identify key immune differences that could help in development of effective HIV vaccine

Researchers identify key immune differences that could help in development of effective HIV vaccine

One of the main mysteries confounding development of an HIV vaccine is why some people infected with the virus make the desired antibodies after several years, but a vaccine can't seem to induce the same response. [More]
Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

Researchers find different immunological profiles in HIV-infected individuals who produce bNAbs

People living with HIV who naturally produce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that may help suppress the virus have different immunological profiles than people who do not, researchers report. [More]
T-cell technology could be used to treat ovarian tumors with no adverse effects

T-cell technology could be used to treat ovarian tumors with no adverse effects

With only incremental improvements in ovarian cancer survival over the last 40 years, there is a clear need for new treatment options with long-lasting results. Many researchers have turned toward the development of immunotherapies that direct T-cells to selectively eliminate ovarian tumor cells, but an appropriate therapeutic target for ovarian cancers has remained elusive. [More]
Novel conjugate therapy shows promise in destroying ALL cells with few side effects

Novel conjugate therapy shows promise in destroying ALL cells with few side effects

Researchers at UC Davis and Ionis Pharmaceuticals have developed a hybrid treatment that harnesses a monoclonal antibody to deliver antisense DNA to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells and that may lead to less toxic treatments for the disease. [More]
Researchers find easy way to ensure baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C

Researchers find easy way to ensure baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C

Baby boomers, adults born between 1945 and 1965, are five times more likely to have been exposed to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). [More]
Recombinant antigens and antibodies for the Zika virus

Recombinant antigens and antibodies for the Zika virus

Anglo-American life science firm AMSBIO announces a new range of recombinant antigens and antibodies for Zika virus, which are suited for the development of rapid assays and to overcome the problem of cross-reactivity with related viruses. [More]
Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists discover vaccine-induced antibodies that can counteract varied strains of influenza virus

Scientists have identified three types of vaccine-induced antibodies that can neutralize diverse strains of influenza virus that infect humans. [More]
Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

Penn researchers construct model to examine how immune system may evolve to conquer HIV

It has remained frustratingly difficult to develop a vaccine for HIV/AIDS, in part because the virus, once in our bodies, rapidly reproduces and evolves to escape being killed by the immune system. [More]
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs

Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to an undetectable level in most chronically infected people, it cannot eliminate reservoirs of HIV that persist in latently infected immune cells. [More]
Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding new monoclonal antibody to chemotherapy improves survival in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Adding a novel monoclonal antibody therapy to traditional chemotherapy increased median survival by nearly a year in patients with advanced sarcoma, a lethal soft-tissue cancer. [More]
Penn researchers develop plant-based oral vaccine booster

Penn researchers develop plant-based oral vaccine booster

Jonas Salk created a vaccine against polio that has been used since 1955; Albert Sabin created another version that has been on the market since 1961. Together, these two vaccines have nearly eliminated polio from the face of the earth. [More]
Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Researchers develop antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis

Inserm Unit U919, directed by Prof. Denis Vivien has developed an antibody with potential therapeutic effects against multiple sclerosis. [More]
Protein present on stem cell surface can boost growth of damaged muscle tissue

Protein present on stem cell surface can boost growth of damaged muscle tissue

Johns Hopkins University biologists have found that a protein that plays a key role in the lives of stem cells can bolster the growth of damaged muscle tissue, a step that could potentially contribute to treatments for muscle degeneration caused by old age and diseases such as muscular dystrophy. [More]
Cancer immunotherapy could treat HIV

Cancer immunotherapy could treat HIV

A type of immunotherapy that has shown promising results against cancer could also be used against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. [More]
New treatment may destroy HIV's last refuge

New treatment may destroy HIV's last refuge

UK scientists may have found a way to destroy HIV's last refuge. A study by Oxford University has confirmed that a treatment developed by a British company can remove the virus in its chosen hiding place, in laboratory conditions, offering hope of a viable treatment. [More]
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