Antibody News and Research RSS Feed - Antibody News and Research

An antibody is a blood protein that is produced in response to and counteracts an antigen. Antibodies are produced in response to disease and help the body fight against the particular disease. In this way, antibodies help the body develop an immunity to disease.
Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

Flu vaccine based upon four strains of inactivated influenza enhances flu protection

A flu vaccine given just under the surface of the skin that includes four strains of inactivated influenza could be more protective than a similar flu vaccine containing only three strains, Saint Louis University research found. [More]
Islet autoantibody levels predict progression to diabetes

Islet autoantibody levels predict progression to diabetes

Levels of insulin autoantibodies and insulinoma-associated protein 2 autoantibodies predict the onset of diabetes in young children with islet autoimmunity, show findings from the TEDDY study. [More]
Combination of anti-Nodal and DTIC therapy can produce anti-cancer effects

Combination of anti-Nodal and DTIC therapy can produce anti-cancer effects

Metastatic melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer deaths in the United States; once melanoma has spread (metastasized), life expectancy for patients can be dramatically shortened. [More]

Researchers investigate effects of neuromodulatory medication on orofacial tissue

Today at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research, researcher M.J. Al-Musawi, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, will present a study titled "In Vitro Effects of Topical Neuromodulatory Medication on Orofacial Tissue." [More]
New immunotoxin found to be safe, effective in patients with B-cell malignancies

New immunotoxin found to be safe, effective in patients with B-cell malignancies

Almost all patients with a group of blood cancers called B-cell malignancies have two prominent "fingerprints" on the surface of leukemia and lymphoma cancers, called CD22 and CD19, Vallera explained. [More]
Oxis Biotech executes licensing agreement with MCIT for development of antibody-drug conjugates

Oxis Biotech executes licensing agreement with MCIT for development of antibody-drug conjugates

Oxis Biotech, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Oxis International, Inc., announced today the execution of a definitive licensing and development agreement with MultiCell Immunotherapeutics, Inc. concerning the development of certain antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). [More]
Understanding strengths and weaknesses of hepatitis C viruses

Understanding strengths and weaknesses of hepatitis C viruses

Using a specially selected library of different hepatitis C viruses, a team of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists has identified tiny differences in the pathogens' outer shell proteins that underpin their resistance to antibodies. [More]
Andor Neo sCMOS camera is perfect partner for correlative microscopy

Andor Neo sCMOS camera is perfect partner for correlative microscopy

CD44 is recognised as an important cell surface receptor involved in the adhesion of circulating leukocytes to endothelium, a process that is critical for their trafficking in the vasculature. Now, a Japanese group of researchers using an ultra-sensitive Andor Neo sCMOS camera in their correlative microscopy set-up has demonstrated that microvilli projections around the cell surface mediate this adhesion. [More]
Weak spots in ebola’s defenses: an interview with Dr. Andrew Ward

Weak spots in ebola’s defenses: an interview with Dr. Andrew Ward

There are hundreds of other antibodies against Ebola that we are in the process of imaging using the electron microscope. We are looking for new sites of vulnerability as well as subtle differences in the way the known sites are attacked. In particular we are looking for antibodies that the virus is unlikely to escape from when it mutates. [More]
United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics announces FDA approval of dinutuximab for treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved Unituxin (dinutuximab) Injection (formerly called ch14.18), in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and 13-cis-retinoic acid (RA), for the treatment of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma who achieve at least a partial response to prior first-line multiagent, multimodality therapy. [More]
Finding appears to support the hypothesis that Alzheimer's is an autoimmune disease

Finding appears to support the hypothesis that Alzheimer's is an autoimmune disease

Brain levels of the lipid ceramide are high in Alzheimer's disease, and now scientists have found increased levels of an antibody to the lipid in their disease model. [More]
M-MDSCs may be effective in treating arthritis in humans

M-MDSCs may be effective in treating arthritis in humans

Using a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, scientists have discovered that a form of cellular immunotherapy by intravenous administration of monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, or M-MDSCs, might be an effective treatment for the disease in humans. [More]
Scientists design a promising vaccine for herpes viruses

Scientists design a promising vaccine for herpes viruses

Herpes simplex virus infections are an enormous global health problem and there is currently no viable vaccine. [More]
Chronic heart failure patients with decreased calcitriol may benefit from aggressive supplementation

Chronic heart failure patients with decreased calcitriol may benefit from aggressive supplementation

In patients with chronic heart failure, the vitamin D metabolite 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), also called calcitriol, and its ratio to parathyroid hormone (PTH 1-84) may help predict cardiovascular death; and patients with decreased calcitriol and decreased ratio of calcitriol to PTH might benefit from more aggressive supplementation, a new study finds. [More]
New type of vaccine holds promise for prevention of genital herpes

New type of vaccine holds promise for prevention of genital herpes

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have designed a new type of vaccine that could be the first-ever for preventing genital herpes--one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, affecting some 500 million people worldwide. [More]
Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests study

Adults over the age of 30 only catch flu about twice a decade, a new study suggests. Flu-like illness can be caused by many pathogens, making it difficult to assess how often people are infected by influenza. [More]
Key 'energy producing' protein plays a critical role in a good immune system

Key 'energy producing' protein plays a critical role in a good immune system

A good immune system relies on a key 'energy producing' protein in immune cells to develop immunity to vaccines and disease, an international team of scientists has found. [More]
Diplomat Pharmacy selected to distribute Novartis' COSENTYX (secukinumab)

Diplomat Pharmacy selected to distribute Novartis' COSENTYX (secukinumab)

Diplomat Pharmacy, Inc. has been selected to the Novartis limited-distribution panel to distribute COSENTYX (secukinumab), a drug approved in January by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
New antibody provides 100% protection against H5N1 influenza virus in animal models

New antibody provides 100% protection against H5N1 influenza virus in animal models

Since 2003, the H5N1 influenza virus, more commonly known as the bird flu, has been responsible for the deaths of millions of chickens and ducks and has infected more than 650 people, leading to a 60 percent mortality rate for the latter. Luckily, this virus has yet to achieve human-to-human transmission, but a small number of mutations could change that, resulting in a pandemic. [More]
Texas Tech University professor receives CPRIT grants to study movement of tumor cells

Texas Tech University professor receives CPRIT grants to study movement of tumor cells

Siva Vanapalli, an associate professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, at Texas Tech University, recently received two grants from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to study the movement of tumor cells throughout the body and new methods of detecting cancer cells. [More]
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