Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
Cornell biomedical engineers develop 'super natural killer cells' to destroy cancer cells in lymph nodes

Cornell biomedical engineers develop 'super natural killer cells' to destroy cancer cells in lymph nodes

Cornell biomedical engineers have developed specialized white blood cells - dubbed "super natural killer cells" - that seek out cancer cells in lymph nodes with only one purpose: destroy them. [More]
Potential new drug target for acute myeloid leukemia

Potential new drug target for acute myeloid leukemia

New treatment options are badly needed for acute myeloid leukemia, a relatively rare form of cancer. The malignancy begins in the bone marrow, and from there can spread rapidly to the bloodstream, depriving the body of the essential blood cells that carry oxygen and fight infections. [More]
DelMar reports positive data from preclinical study of VAL-083 for treatment of ovarian cancer

DelMar reports positive data from preclinical study of VAL-083 for treatment of ovarian cancer

DelMar Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of new cancer therapies, announced that yesterday it presented positive preclinical data demonstrating the promising potential of its lead product candidate VAL-083 (dianhydrogalactitol) as a treatment for ovarian cancer. [More]
Discovery may provide noninvasive approach to assessing toxic effects of anesthetic agents in children

Discovery may provide noninvasive approach to assessing toxic effects of anesthetic agents in children

Could looking at the eyes provide a new way of studying how anesthesia affects the developing brain? The retinas of immature mice exposed to one widely used general anesthetic show evidence of "programmed cell death," or apoptosis, reports a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Analysis of high-throughput sequencing data reveals new genes linked to chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Analysis of high-throughput sequencing data reveals new genes linked to chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Johannes Reiter, former PhD student in the group of Krishnendu Chatterjee at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), is co-author of a Nature paper on genetic alterations that drive the progression and relapse of cancer. [More]
Can-Fite's CF102 granted Orphan Drug Designation by EMA for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

Can-Fite's CF102 granted Orphan Drug Designation by EMA for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, today announced the Company's oncology drug candidate, CF102, has been granted Orphan Drug Designation by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the indication of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. [More]
Glycan binding proteins modify parasite infection in cells of the heart muscle

Glycan binding proteins modify parasite infection in cells of the heart muscle

Chagas disease is the main cause of infectious heart disease in Latin America. Researchers from the INGEBI and IBYME Institutes in Argentina explored the effect of glycan binding protein interactions between the human host and Typanosoma cruzi parasite. They found that a glycan binding protein expressed in humans modified the infection in cells of the heart muscle, showing the importance of galectins in the response to parasite infection. [More]
NIH researchers discover why certain immune responses can be harmful to the brain

NIH researchers discover why certain immune responses can be harmful to the brain

National Institutes of Health scientists studying inflammation of the brain have discovered why certain immune responses, which typically help cells recognize and fight viral and bacterial infections, can sometimes be harmful to the brain. Many brain disorders involve the death of neurons, or nerve cells, but how these neurons die is not well understood. [More]
Beta-catenin shows treatment target potential for TKI-resistant CML

Beta-catenin shows treatment target potential for TKI-resistant CML

Nuclear β-catenin could be a treatment target for patients whose chronic myeloid leukaemia is resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors independent of additional BCR–BL1 mutations, US researchers suggest. [More]
Leading cancer researchers address eight 'big questions'

Leading cancer researchers address eight 'big questions'

Leading cancer researchers address eight of the "big questions" facing the field as part of the inaugural issue of Trends in Cancer, published by Cell Press. [More]
Amgen gets positive CHMP opinions for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) and BLINCYTO (blinatumomab)

Amgen gets positive CHMP opinions for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) and BLINCYTO (blinatumomab)

"We are pleased to receive positive CHMP opinions for Kyprolis and BLINCYTO as this is an important step in providing new treatment options for patients in Europe with rare forms of cancer," said Sean E. Harper, M.D., executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen. [More]
TUM, Stanford University scientists create new cancer therapy concept

TUM, Stanford University scientists create new cancer therapy concept

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer and one of the most difficult to treat. Its high resistance to treatment is a major problem, particularly in the advanced stages. [More]
Researchers identify a protein that could potentially stop cancer

Researchers identify a protein that could potentially stop cancer

Scientists know that most cancer cells use glucose to fuel their uncontrolled growth and now an international team of researchers has identified a protein which if switched off could stop the disease in its tracks. [More]
Amgen, Xencor partner to develop and commercialize new therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, inflammation

Amgen, Xencor partner to develop and commercialize new therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, inflammation

Amgen and Xencor, Inc. announced today that the two companies have entered into a research and license agreement to develop and commercialize novel therapeutics in the areas of cancer immunotherapy and inflammation. [More]
UGA microbiology researchers identify potential mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases

UGA microbiology researchers identify potential mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases

Microbiology researchers at the University of Georgia studying a soil bacterium have identified a potential mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Simple stem cell production method shows promise in mice for treating IPF

Simple stem cell production method shows promise in mice for treating IPF

In a small pilot study, researchers from North Carolina State University have demonstrated a rapid, simple way to generate large numbers of lung stem cells for use in disease treatment. This method of harvesting and growing a patient's own lung stem cells shows promise in mice for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and could one day provide human IPF sufferers with an effective, less invasive method of treatment for their disease. [More]
New study reveals pivotal role of miR-506 biomarker in gastric cancer

New study reveals pivotal role of miR-506 biomarker in gastric cancer

Gastric cancer poses a significant health problem in developing countries and is typically associated with late-stage diagnosis and high mortality. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology points to a pivotal role played by the biomarker microRNA (miR)-506 in gastric cancer. [More]
HUYA Bioscience International expands HBI-8000 clinical trials for breast cancer

HUYA Bioscience International expands HBI-8000 clinical trials for breast cancer

HUYA Bioscience International (HUYA) today announced expanding clinical trials with its lead cancer drug, HBI-8000, starting with a Phase 1 combination trial in support of a breast cancer program to be conducted in the United States. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism responsible for development of adrenal gland tumors

Scientists uncover mechanism responsible for development of adrenal gland tumors

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have elucidated a mechanism that is responsible for the development of adrenal gland tumors. They discovered that the BMP7 protein plays a key role in this process and that it could be a possible target for future treatments. The results have been published in the journal 'Oncotarget'. [More]
MTG Biotherapeutics' MTG-201 granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for malignant mesothelioma treatment

MTG Biotherapeutics' MTG-201 granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for malignant mesothelioma treatment

MTG Biotherapeutics, an immuno-oncology company developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer, today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted Orphan Drug Designation for MTG-201, an advanced biologic therapy targeting Dickkopf-3 gene defects in various cancers, for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma. [More]
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