Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
Scientists examine how substances at low concentrations may impact human health

Scientists examine how substances at low concentrations may impact human health

A public and scientific discussion is currently taking place focusing on the question whether substances at low concentrations may lead to health impairments in humans. For this reason, an increasing number of experimental studies to test such effects are currently conducted using different chemicals. [More]
TSRI scientists confirm ribosome assembly as new target for anti-cancer drugs

TSRI scientists confirm ribosome assembly as new target for anti-cancer drugs

Ribosomes, ancient molecular machines that produce proteins in cells, are required for cell growth in all organisms, accomplishing strikingly complex tasks with apparent ease. But defects in the assembly process and its regulation can lead to serious biological problems, including cancer. [More]
Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

Researchers identify new class of drugs that slows aging process

A research team from The Scripps Research Institute, Mayo Clinic and other institutions has identified a new class of drugs that in animal models dramatically slows the aging process—alleviating symptoms of frailty, improving cardiac function and extending a healthy lifespan. [More]
Researchers review ten years of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women

Researchers review ten years of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women

Researchers from the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona (Spain) have reviewed ten years' worth of scientific studies on mitochondrial toxicity in pregnant women. Exposure to toxic agents such as viruses, certain drugs, pesticides, alcohol and tobacco cause mitochondrial diseases about which very little is known, and which are transmitted from the mother to the foetus. [More]
TSRI scientists discover novel mechanism involved in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and ALS

TSRI scientists discover novel mechanism involved in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and ALS

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have for the first time discovered a killing mechanism that could underpin a range of the most intractable neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and ALS. [More]
Findings show how human bodies restrict production of IgE to prevent allergic reaction

Findings show how human bodies restrict production of IgE to prevent allergic reaction

Scientists from the CNRS, INSERM and Université de Limoges, working in the Laboratoire Contrôle de la Réponse Immune B et Lymphoproliférations (CNRS/Université de Limoges) have demonstrated that the production of type E immunoglobulins (IgE) by B lymphocytes induces a loss in their mobility and the initiation of cell death mechanisms. [More]
'Mad Cow' discovery points to possible neuron killing mechanism behind alzheimer’s and parkinson’s diseases

'Mad Cow' discovery points to possible neuron killing mechanism behind alzheimer’s and parkinson’s diseases

The new study, published recently in the journal Brain, revealed the mechanism of toxicity of a misfolded form of the protein that underlies prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (“mad cow disease”) and its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. [More]
New research provides hope for treating stroke using HUCBCs

New research provides hope for treating stroke using HUCBCs

Researchers have known that transplanted human umbilical cord cells (HUCBCs) can have a restorative effect on the brain and brain function following a stroke. However, just how the cells exert their therapeutic effects has not been clear. Now, a research team from the University of South Florida using animal models of stroke has found that the HUCBCs are most beneficial in preventing neuron loss when the Akt signaling pathway is activated by secretions from the HUCBCs and that Akt activation subsequently impacts a specific gene involved in reducing inflammation. [More]
Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

In a new research study, scientists from Vision Genomics, LLC, Insilico Medicine, Inc., and Howard University showed that Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS or Progeria) is comparable to normal aging with respect to cellular signaling pathways, and that HGPS truly recapitulates the normal aging process. [More]
CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

CHLA researchers develop new protein-based therapy against drug-resistant leukemia cells

Resistance of leukemia cells to contemporary chemotherapy is one of the most formidable obstacles to treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. Now researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have designed and developed a new protein-based therapy they believe will prove highly effective against drug-resistant leukemia cells. [More]
NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

NMR in cancer research: an interview with Andy Byrd

My research these days is generally classified as structural biology, although as I trained in chemistry. I specialize in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applied to biological problems. Our lab is very interested in studying mammalian proteins, particularly systems involved in cancer, in order to try to understand mechanisms to provide that information for our collaborators, and for the general knowledge of the community as well. [More]
PKC enzymes categorized as cancer promoters are actually tumor suppressors

PKC enzymes categorized as cancer promoters are actually tumor suppressors

Upending decades-old dogma, a team of scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine say enzymes long categorized as promoting cancer are, in fact, tumor suppressors and that current clinical efforts to develop inhibitor-based drugs should instead focus on restoring the enzymes' activities. [More]
Kinex Pharmaceuticals doses first actinic keratosis patient with KX2-391 ointment

Kinex Pharmaceuticals doses first actinic keratosis patient with KX2-391 ointment

Kinex Pharmaceuticals announced today that the first actinic keratosis patient has been dosed with KX2-391 ointment in Austin, Texas. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers target cells' biological clock to kill cancer cells, shrink tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers target cells' biological clock to kill cancer cells, shrink tumor growth

Cell biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have targeted telomeres with a small molecule called 6-thiodG that takes advantage of the cell's 'biological clock' to kill cancer cells and shrink tumor growth. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma begins dosing in CF102 Phase II liver cancer trial

Can-Fite BioPharma begins dosing in CF102 Phase II liver cancer trial

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company advancing a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address cancer and inflammatory diseases, today announced that it has dosed the first patient in a Phase II trial for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. [More]
Scientists identify white blood cells that tumors use to suppress disease-fighting immune system

Scientists identify white blood cells that tumors use to suppress disease-fighting immune system

A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists has identified the population of white blood cells that tumors use to enhance growth and suppress the disease-fighting immune system. [More]
Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

Preclinical study strongly supports NT-113 as potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme

NewGen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced the publication of preclinical research strongly supporting NT-113, the company's novel irreversible pan-erbB inhibitor (EGFR, HER2 and HER4), as a potential new treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and most aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. [More]
UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

UC Davis researchers uncover complex relationship between p53 and Rbm38 proteins

Scientists have long known the p53 protein suppresses tumors. However, a recent animal study by UC Davis researchers has uncovered a complicated relationship between p53 and another protein, Rbm38, highlighting how the body calibrates protein levels. Too much Rbm38 reduces p53 levels, increasing the risk of cancer. [More]
FL118 agent shows efficacy as personalized, targeted therapy for certain cancer tumors

FL118 agent shows efficacy as personalized, targeted therapy for certain cancer tumors

A team led by Fengzhi Li, PhD, and Xinjiang Wang, PhD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute has reported new findings regarding therapeutic targets of the novel anticancer agent FL118. Previous studies from these researchers have showed that FL118 induces cancer cell death, or apoptosis, by inhibiting expression of multiple cell-survival proteins (survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2). [More]
Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen today announced that new data from a pivotal Phase 2 study evaluating BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
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