Apoptosis News and Research RSS Feed - Apoptosis News and Research

Apoptosis is programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.
TMDU researchers identify novel type of cell death in Huntington's disease

TMDU researchers identify novel type of cell death in Huntington's disease

In Huntington's disease (HD), the huntingtin gene is mutated, causing progressive neuronal death. [More]
BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart

The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle. [More]
International scientists unravel mystery of newly discovered type of controlled cell death

International scientists unravel mystery of newly discovered type of controlled cell death

A multidisciplinary international team of scientists solved the mystery of a recently discovered type of controlled cell death, mapping the path to potential therapies for conditions ranging from radiation injury to cancer. [More]
Scientists show how key protein can be important driver of prostate cancer

Scientists show how key protein can be important driver of prostate cancer

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have demonstrated how a protein called TRAP1 - an important regulator of energy production in healthy and cancerous cells - is an important driver of prostate cancer and appears to be a valuable therapeutic target for the disease. [More]
Regular consumption of dietary emulsifiers promotes colorectal cancer in mice

Regular consumption of dietary emulsifiers promotes colorectal cancer in mice

Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter intestinal bacteria in a manner that promotes intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer, according to a new study. [More]
New treatment with therapeutic short interfering RNA could help thwart cancer

New treatment with therapeutic short interfering RNA could help thwart cancer

In the fight against cancer, doctors dish out combination-blows of surgery, chemotherapy and other drugs to beat back a merciless foe. Now, scientists have taken early steps toward adding a stinging punch to clinicians' repertoire. [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
Researchers take significant step forward in genetic sex reprogramming research

Researchers take significant step forward in genetic sex reprogramming research

An international team of researchers, led by the University of Granada, has taken a significant step forward on the research on 'genetic sex reprogramming', which is closer now, although it's still an utopia. [More]
New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury

New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. [More]
TSRI scientists elucidate how Zika virus attacks the brains of newborns

TSRI scientists elucidate how Zika virus attacks the brains of newborns

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, information that could accelerate the development of treatments. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that triggers brain cell death from strokes and injuries

Johns Hopkins researchers identify protein that triggers brain cell death from strokes and injuries

Despite their different triggers, the same molecular chain of events appears to be responsible for brain cell death from strokes, injuries and even such neurodegenerative diseases as Alzheimer's. [More]
BUSM scientists map active human apoptosome to provide better understanding of cell death

BUSM scientists map active human apoptosome to provide better understanding of cell death

Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, plays a central role in the maintenance of human health by providing a line of defense against unrestricted cell growth that occurs in many cancers and AIDS as well as in neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. [More]
Researchers reveal how ultrasmall nanoparticles can kill cancer cells

Researchers reveal how ultrasmall nanoparticles can kill cancer cells

Nanoparticles known as Cornell dots, or C dots, have shown great promise as a therapeutic tool in the detection and treatment of cancer. [More]
Scientists discover new switch that coordinates DNA repair and cell death

Scientists discover new switch that coordinates DNA repair and cell death

The genetic information of every cell is encoded in the sequence of the DNA double helix. Double strand breaks in the DNA, which can be induced by radiation, are a dangerous threat to the cells, and if not properly repaired can lead to cancer. [More]
Columbia researchers find way to reawaken potent cancer-fighting molecule in tumor cells

Columbia researchers find way to reawaken potent cancer-fighting molecule in tumor cells

A potent cancer-fighting molecule in our cells can be reawakened by reducing levels of a protein - called SET - that's often found in excess in cancer cells, a new study from Columbia University's Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center has found. [More]
Researchers identify genes that regulate cellular senescence

Researchers identify genes that regulate cellular senescence

A research group including Professor KAMADA Shinji, Research Fellow NAGANO Taiki (both from the Kobe University Biosignal Research Center), and Unit Chief ENARI Masato (National Cancer Research Institute) has succeeded in identifying genes that control cellular senescence - permanently arrested cell growth. [More]
New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials. [More]
Experimental drug may become key tool to target triple-negative breast cancer with immunotherapy

Experimental drug may become key tool to target triple-negative breast cancer with immunotherapy

Previous studies at the University of Colorado Cancer Center show that the experimental drug AMPI-109 potently kills triple-negative breast cancer cells. [More]
Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen seeks to extend DARZALEX license to benefit more multiple myeloma patients

Janssen-Cilag International NV has announced the submission of a Type II variation application to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), seeking to broaden the existing marketing authorisation for the immunotherapy DARZALEX® (daratumumab) to include treatment of adult patients with relapsed multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The expanded indication is based on daratumumab in combination with lenalidomide (an immmunomodulatory agent) and dexamethasone, or bortezomib (a PI) and dexamethasone. [More]
Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Before I explain the discovery, I would take a step back and explain an interesting event that takes place in the cancer cells. Normal cells follow a rapid and irreversible process to efficiently eradicate dysfunctional cells. This is a natural process by which damaged cells commit ‘suicide’. This process is known as apoptosis or programmed cell death. [More]
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