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An appendicectomy (or appendectomy) is the surgical removal of the vermiform appendix. This procedure is normally performed as an emergency procedure, when the patient is suffering from acute appendicitis. In the absence of surgical facilities, intravenous antibiotics are used to delay or avoid the onset of sepsis; it is now recognized that many cases will resolve when treated non-operatively. In some cases the appendicitis resolves completely; more often, an inflammatory mass forms around the appendix. This is a relative contraindication to surgery.
Antibiotics present a safe option for treating children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Antibiotics present a safe option for treating children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Using antibiotics alone to treat children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis is a reasonable alternative to surgery that leads to less pain and fewer missed school days, according to a pilot study. [More]
EvergreenHealth named one of America's 100 Best Hospitals in three specialty areas

EvergreenHealth named one of America's 100 Best Hospitals in three specialty areas

EvergreenHealth today announced it has earned several distinctions for 2014 across many of the health care system's specialties from Healthgrades, the nation's leading independent provider of information to help consumers make informed decisions about a physician or hospital. [More]

Researchers develop new guidelines to govern amount of blood ordered for surgical patients

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed new guidelines - the first in more than 35 years - to govern the amount of blood ordered for surgical patients. [More]

Data on experience-related outcomes in children's surgery vary: Report

A review of the available medical literature suggests that data on experience-related outcomes in children's surgery are limited and vary widely in methodologic quality, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Pediatrics, a JAMA Network publication. [More]
Surprises found in postoperative pain rankings

Surprises found in postoperative pain rankings

Patients report “unexpectedly high” levels of pain after some relatively minor surgical procedures, including some laparoscopic procedures, say researchers. [More]

Hospital type plays a role in racial disparities and appendicitis outcomes in children

When researchers from UCLA Medical Center investigated the link between racial disparities and appendicitis outcomes in children, they found that the type of hospital in which black, Hispanic and other minority patients receive care-community, children's or county-affects their odds of developing a perforated appendix. The study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons is a first-of-its-kind look at the role hospital type plays in race-based treatment variances among this patient subset. [More]

Use of CT scans for children suspected of having appendicitis varies among hospitals

Children suspected of having appendicitis are more likely to receive CT scans, which involve radiation, if they are evaluated at a general hospital, a new study by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown. [More]

Study addresses cost of patient care in acute care surgical settings

An acute care surgery model led to improvement in the quality of surgical patient care and reduced the cost of emergency surgical care at Loma Linda University Medical Center, report researchers who published their findings in the November issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]
No benefit from irrigation during appendectomy

No benefit from irrigation during appendectomy

Irrigating the peritoneal cavity during appendectomy for perforated appendicitis offers no advantage over suction alone, with similar rates of postoperative abscess in children treated using both approaches, according to the findings of a US study. [More]
Alzheimer's pathology might be increased in patients after surgery and anesthesia

Alzheimer's pathology might be increased in patients after surgery and anesthesia

A syndrome called "post-operative cognitive decline" has been coined to refer to the commonly reported loss of cognitive abilities, usually in older adults, in the days to weeks after surgery. In fact, some patients time the onset of their Alzheimer's disease symptoms from a surgical procedure. [More]
NHS hospitals have scope to make efficiency savings by adopting best practice

NHS hospitals have scope to make efficiency savings by adopting best practice

NHS hospitals have substantial scope to improve their efficiency by adopting best practice, according to research published today by Professor Andrew Street and colleagues at the Centre for Health Economics (CHE) at the University of York. [More]
Laparoscopic appendectomy preferable for obese patients

Laparoscopic appendectomy preferable for obese patients

Obese patients with appendicitis have fewer postoperative complications, a shorter stay in hospital, and shorter operative times when treated with laparoscopic appendectomy rather than open appendectomy, study findings show. [More]
Obese patients with appendix less likely to have complications after minimally invasive procedure

Obese patients with appendix less likely to have complications after minimally invasive procedure

Obese patients who need to have their appendixes removed fare better after a minimally invasive surgical procedure rather than an open operation, according to a new study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]

Scoring system identifies appendicitis in pediatric acute abdomen pain

Using a pediatric appendicitis score may help to identify true cases of appendicitis among children who present to emergency departments with acute abdominal pain, researchers report. [More]

Removing ruptured appendix sooner lowers hospital costs, charges

Removing a child's ruptured appendix sooner rather than later significantly lowers hospital costs and charges, according to a recently published study. [More]
Research roundup: Practice guidelines may not stop defensive medicine; English language ability tied to hospital readmission rates

Research roundup: Practice guidelines may not stop defensive medicine; English language ability tied to hospital readmission rates

The Value of Clinical Practice Guidelines As Malpractice "Safe Harbors" -- Overspending on health care has frequently been attributed to doctors practicing defensive medicine -- ordering extra tests, for example -- so that they avoid malpractice lawsuits. The authors of this brief write that while some have said clinical guidelines "should give caregivers a liability 'safe harbor,' shielding them from any malpractice claim for failing to provide services not included in the guideline." [More]

Health care not structured in the interest of the patient

You're enjoying a quiet weekend at home when suddenly you double over in pain. You need emergency appendectomy surgery. How much should it cost? And how much price shopping are you able to do? [More]
Early appendectomy can reduce length of stay, medical interventions and hospital charges

Early appendectomy can reduce length of stay, medical interventions and hospital charges

Pediatric surgeons can lower health care costs if they remove a young patient's perforated appendix sooner rather than later, according to new study results published in the April issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]

Single-port laparoscopic appendectomy performed at Valley Presbyterian Hospital

Surgeons at Valley Presbyterian Hospital (VPH) recently performed the hospital's first-ever single-port laparoscopic appendectomy, a minimally invasive surgical procedure for removing an infected appendix, which reduces scarring and healing time because it requires only one incision, Gustavo Valdespino, VPH president and CEO, announced today. [More]

Results from AspenBio Pharma's AppyScore trial on appendicitis to be presented at SAEM meeting

The results from AspenBio Pharma's 503-patient pilot study of AppyScore will be presented from the podium the upcoming West Region meeting of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) being held in Las Vegas, March 16-17. [More]