Appendicitis News and Research RSS Feed - Appendicitis News and Research

Appendicitis is a painful swelling and infection of the appendix. The appendix is a fingerlike pouch attached to the large intestine and located in the lower right area of the abdomen. Scientists are not sure what the appendix does, if anything, but removing it does not appear to affect a person’s health. The inside of the appendix is called the appendiceal lumen. Mucus created by the appendix travels through the appendiceal lumen and empties into the large intestine.
Study shows appendicitis patients can be safely discharged on same day of surgery

Study shows appendicitis patients can be safely discharged on same day of surgery

Patients with acute appendicitis who undergo laparoscopic appendectomy do not experience higher rates of postoperative complications or costly readmissions when sent home on the same day of their operations compared with patients hospitalized overnight, according to study results published online as an "article in press" on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website ahead of print publication. [More]
Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients

Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. A series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis. [More]
Study shows increase in costs of hospitalization for people with private insurance

Study shows increase in costs of hospitalization for people with private insurance

Even if you have what you might think of as good health insurance, your next hospital stay could cost you more than $1,000 out of your own pocket. [More]
Study indicates mRS is poorly suited to evaluate, report quality of neuro-surgery

Study indicates mRS is poorly suited to evaluate, report quality of neuro-surgery

Surgery has become a volatile field during the past few years, with study after study challenging prevailing treatment practices. For example, surgical treatment of acute appendicitis and arthroscopic surgery on degenerative knees have been called into question by recent research results reached by Finnish researchers. [More]
Antibiotic treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase risk for complications

Antibiotic treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase risk for complications

Using antibiotics as the primary treatment for mild appendicitis does not increase the risk for complications at least in the first year. But other considerations must also be taken into account, say researchers. [More]
Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be successfully treated with endovascular therapy such as balloon angioplasty, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. The study also found that AMI is a more common cause of abdominal pain among the elderly than generally thought; however, it is difficult to diagnose before bowel damage develops. [More]
Researchers find new way to increase patients’ recruitment, retention in clinical trials

Researchers find new way to increase patients’ recruitment, retention in clinical trials

By seeking the advice of patients, families and other stakeholders in designing a clinical trial investigating pediatric appendicitis, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital found a way to significantly increase the number of people recruited and retained in the trial. [More]
Study examines effect of nonoperative treatment for appendicitis

Study examines effect of nonoperative treatment for appendicitis

It is too early to change the standard treatment of appendicitis in U.S. adults to initial antibiotic therapy only, rather than surgical removal of the appendix, or appendectomy, authors of a new systematic review study conclude. [More]
Routine use of antibiotics may not reduce infections in severe appendectomies

Routine use of antibiotics may not reduce infections in severe appendectomies

With acute appendicitis ranking among the nation's most common acute surgical emergencies, researchers studied the relatively routine use of post-operative antibiotics in complicated cases and found that they didn't reduce infections after surgery. They also found that patients who received post-operative antibiotics remained in the hospital up to one day longer than similar patients who had not received antibiotics. [More]
Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Results published today in The New England Journal of Medicine from a Janssen Research & Development, LLC (Janssen)-sponsored Phase 2b trial showed up to 86 percent of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis receiving guselkumab (CNTO 1959) achieved a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of cleared psoriasis or minimal psoriasis at week 16, the study's primary endpoint. [More]
Antibiotic treatment not better than appendectomy for uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Antibiotic treatment not better than appendectomy for uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Among patients with uncomplicated appendicitis, antibiotic treatment did not meet a prespecified level of effectiveness compared with appendectomy, although most patients who received antibiotic therapy did not require an appendectomy, and for those who did, they did not experience significant complications, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]

Duration of antibiotic treatment can be cut by half for complicated abdominal infections

In a finding important for preventing the development of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 22 other institutions have determined that the duration of antibiotic treatment for complicated abdominal infections can be cut by half and remain equally effective. [More]
Acupuncture reduces pain, inflammation in pediatric patients with acute appendicitis

Acupuncture reduces pain, inflammation in pediatric patients with acute appendicitis

Acupuncture was shown to lessen pain and reduce the underlying inflammation in pediatric patients with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, according to a study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Two thirds of the world’s population have no access to safe and affordable surgery

Two thirds of the world’s population have no access to safe and affordable surgery

New estimates suggest that number of people worldwide who are unable to access basic surgery and anaesthesia is more than twice as high as previously thought. [More]
Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Large majority of people in the world lack access to safe, affordable surgery and anaesthesia

Millions of people are dying from common, easily treatable conditions like appendicitis, fractures, or obstructed labour because they do not have access to, or can't afford, proper surgical care, according to a major new Commission, published in The Lancet. [More]
Two diagnostic tests can help identify children who require surgical treatment for appendicitis

Two diagnostic tests can help identify children who require surgical treatment for appendicitis

Data from two standard diagnostic tests commonly obtained in children evaluated for abdominal pain--when combined--can improve the ability of emergency department physicians and pediatric surgeons to identify those patients who should be sent to the operating room for prompt removal of an inflamed appendix; those who may be admitted for observation; and those who may safely be discharged home, according to a new study published online as an "article in press" in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. [More]
Pharmaceutical industry withdraws from the antibiotic space

Pharmaceutical industry withdraws from the antibiotic space

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that at least 2 million Americans are sickened by antibiotic resistant infections each year and survive. [More]
Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis reports positive results from ceftazidime-avibactam Phase III studies in cIAI patients

Actavis plc today confirmed positive topline results from RECLAIM-1 and -2, pivotal Phase III studies evaluating the potential for the investigational antibiotic, ceftazidime-avibactam as a treatment for adult hospitalized patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections. [More]
New algorithm eliminates exposure to radiation when diagnosing children with acute appendicitis

New algorithm eliminates exposure to radiation when diagnosing children with acute appendicitis

Implementation of an algorithm aimed to diagnose pediatric patients with suspected appendicitis reduces the utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans, without affecting diagnostic accuracy, Mayo Clinic Children's Center researchers have found. The study was recently published in the journal Surgery. [More]
Antibiotics present a safe option for treating children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Antibiotics present a safe option for treating children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis

Using antibiotics alone to treat children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis is a reasonable alternative to surgery that leads to less pain and fewer missed school days, according to a pilot study. [More]
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