Arachidonic Acid News and Research RSS Feed - Arachidonic Acid News and Research

Arachidonic acid is an omega-6 fatty acid that is present in the phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositides) of membranes of the body's cells, and is abundant in the brain. It is the counterpart to the saturated arachidic acid found in peanut oil.
Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Study compares breast and bottle fed infants

Infant rhesus monkeys receiving different diets early in life develop distinct immune systems that persist months after weaning, a study by researchers from UC Davis, the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have shown. [More]
Researchers analyze existing cohort studies and randomized trials on coronary risk and fatty acid intake

Researchers analyze existing cohort studies and randomized trials on coronary risk and fatty acid intake

A new study raises questions about current guidelines which generally restrict the consumption of saturated fats and encourage consumption of polyunsaturated fats to prevent heart disease. The research was published today, 18 March, in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Study investigates possible links between sleep and omega-3 DHA fatty acid status in healthy children

Study investigates possible links between sleep and omega-3 DHA fatty acid status in healthy children

A randomised placebo-controlled study by the University of Oxford suggests that higher levels of omega-3 DHA, the group of long-chain fatty acids found in algae and seafood, are associated with better sleep. [More]
Study examines correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids in blood and risk of PTSD

Study examines correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids in blood and risk of PTSD

A study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics has examined the correlation between polyunsaturated fatty acids in the blood and the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder. [More]
Sinai Hospital reports results from Phase 2a trial of apo A-I infusion therapy CSL112

Sinai Hospital reports results from Phase 2a trial of apo A-I infusion therapy CSL112

Researchers from the Sinai Center for Thrombosis Research presented findings from a Phase 2a trial substudy that examined the antiplatelet effects of CSL112, a novel apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) infusion therapy, at the American Heart Association 2013 Scientific Sessions. [More]
Changes in national diets linked to dramatic rise in AD prevalence in Japan and developing countries

Changes in national diets linked to dramatic rise in AD prevalence in Japan and developing countries

In a paper just published electronically in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, dramatic increases in Alzheimer's disease in Japan and significant increases in developing countries are linked to changes in national diets. [More]
Infants fed with DHA-enriched formula score better intelligence in early childhood

Infants fed with DHA-enriched formula score better intelligence in early childhood

University of Kansas scientists have found that infants who were fed formula enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from birth to 12 months scored significantly better than a control group on several measures of intelligence conducted between the ages of three to six years. [More]
Study: Children who were breastfed in infancy more likely to recover from stuttering

Study: Children who were breastfed in infancy more likely to recover from stuttering

A study of 47 children who began stuttering at an early age found that those who were breastfed in infancy were more likely to recover from stuttering and return to fluent speech. [More]
Novel protein could lead to development of new drugs to treat variety of cancers

Novel protein could lead to development of new drugs to treat variety of cancers

In cancer research, discovering a new protein that plays a role in cancer is like finding a key and a treasure map: follow the clues and eventually there could be a big reward. At least that's the hope from a new study published in the journal Nature that discovered a novel protein called ceramide-1 phosphate transport protein (CPTP) -- a finding that could eventually lead to the development of new drugs to treat a variety of cancers and other conditions involving inflammation and thrombosis, or blood clotting. [More]
UC Davis scientists find mechanism in metabolized omega-3 fatty acid that helps combat cancer

UC Davis scientists find mechanism in metabolized omega-3 fatty acid that helps combat cancer

A team of UC Davis scientists has found that a product resulting from a metabolized omega-3 fatty acid helps combat cancer by cutting off the supply of oxygen and nutrients that fuel tumor growth and spread of the disease. [More]
Gene variant boosts ulcer susceptibility in NSAID users

Gene variant boosts ulcer susceptibility in NSAID users

A single nucleotide polymorphism in the cytochrome P450 2C gene cluster influences the risk for peptic ulcer disease in people taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, a study reveals. [More]
Docosahexaenoic acid levels reduced in bipolar disorder patients

Docosahexaenoic acid levels reduced in bipolar disorder patients

Results from an Italian study show that plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid are significantly lower in patients with bipolar disorder than in mentally healthy individuals. [More]
Study on genetic capacity of diverse populations to make critical PUFAs

Study on genetic capacity of diverse populations to make critical PUFAs

World-renowned scientists are taking what they've learned from their multicenter research collaboration studying the health impact of fatty acids on diverse populations to set up a genetics center in India. [More]
Scientists discover first selective inhibitors of DAGL enzymes

Scientists discover first selective inhibitors of DAGL enzymes

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered the first selective inhibitors of an important set of enzymes. The new inhibitors, and chemical probes based on them, now can be used to study the functions of enzymes known as diacylglycerol lipases (DAGL), their products, and the pathways they regulate. [More]
PUFA levels reduced in schizophrenia patients

PUFA levels reduced in schizophrenia patients

Patients with schizophrenia exhibit reduced red blood cell levels of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids , results from a systematic review and meta-analysis show. [More]

PUFA levels reduced in schizophrenia patients

Patients with schizophrenia exhibit reduced red blood cell levels of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids, results from a systematic review and meta-analysis show. [More]

PUFA levels reduced in schizophrenia patients

Results from a systematic review and meta-analysis show that erythrocyte membrane concentrations of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids are reduced in the brains of people with schizophrenia. [More]
New DHA and ARA source suitable for supplementation of infant formulas

New DHA and ARA source suitable for supplementation of infant formulas

Scientists are reporting development of a healthy "designer fat" that, when added to infant formula, provides a key nutrient that premature babies need in high quantities, but isn't available in large enough amounts in their mothers' milk. [More]
Researchers map processes that power health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids

Researchers map processes that power health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids

For the first time, researchers at the University of California, San Diego have peered inside a living mouse cell and mapped the processes that power the celebrated health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. More profoundly, they say their findings suggest it may be possible to manipulate these processes to short-circuit inflammation before it begins, or at least help to resolve inflammation before it becomes detrimental. [More]
Study confirms that COX-2 inhibitors predispose people to cardiovascular disease

Study confirms that COX-2 inhibitors predispose people to cardiovascular disease

After nearly 13 years of study and intense debate, a pair of new papers from the Perelman School of Medicine, at the University of Pennsylvania have confirmed exactly how a once-popular class of anti-inflammatory drugs leads to cardiovascular risk for people taking it. [More]