Artemisinin News and Research RSS Feed - Artemisinin News and Research

Artemisinin is a drug used to treat multi-drug resistant strains of falciparum malaria. The compound (a sesquiterpene lactone) is isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Not all plants of this species contain artemisinin.
Achilles' heel of malaria parasite could be exploited to treat deadly disease

Achilles' heel of malaria parasite could be exploited to treat deadly disease

Malaria researchers at The Australian National University have found one of the malaria parasite's best weapons against drug treatments turns out to be an Achilles' heel, which could be exploited to cure the deadly disease. [More]
New computer model shows how spleen filters misshapen red blood cells

New computer model shows how spleen filters misshapen red blood cells

Researchers, led by Carnegie Mellon University President Subra Suresh and MIT Principal Research Scientist Ming Dao, have created a new computer model that shows how tiny slits in the spleen prevent old, diseased or misshapen red blood cells from re-entering the bloodstream. [More]
KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

KARMA study confirms resistance to anti-malarial drugs confined to Southeast Asia

The first global mapping of artemisinin resistance has definitively confirmed that resistance to the main drug currently used in the treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is for the moment confined to Southeast Asia and has not spread to sub-Saharan Africa. [More]
New and inexpensive technique could help meet global demands for malaria drug

New and inexpensive technique could help meet global demands for malaria drug

A new and inexpensive technique for mass-producing the main ingredient in the most effective treatment for malaria, artemisinin, could help meet global demands for the drug, according to a study to be published in the journal eLife. [More]
Dual-acting hybrid drug could be a promising new weapon against drug-resistant malaria

Dual-acting hybrid drug could be a promising new weapon against drug-resistant malaria

A combination of artemisinin and another drug (artemisinin combination therapy, ACT) is currently the best malaria treatment recommended by the World Health Organization. [More]
Traditional Chinese medicinal plant produces compounds that may help to kill human cancers

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant produces compounds that may help to kill human cancers

New research led by Professor Cathie Martin of the John Innes Centre has revealed how a plant used in traditional Chinese medicine produces compounds which may help to treat cancer and liver diseases. [More]
Multiple combination therapies could prevent malaria resistance

Multiple combination therapies could prevent malaria resistance

In order to preserve first-line drugs for treating malaria, multiple combination therapies should be deployed within a population to prevent resistance from developing, according to Maciej Boni from the Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, UK, and colleagues in a Policy Forum article published in this week's PLOS Medicine. [More]
Competition between mixed malaria parasite strains could influence drug resistance

Competition between mixed malaria parasite strains could influence drug resistance

Scientists have documented for the first time how competition among different malaria parasite strains in human hosts could influence the spread of drug resistance. [More]
Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine effective in treating malaria in pregnant women

Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine effective in treating malaria in pregnant women

Pregnant women can be protected from malaria, a major cause of prematurity, low birth weight and death in infants in Africa, with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine , an artemisinin combination therapy that is already widely used to treat malaria in adults, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and in Uganda. [More]
Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria

Rutgers' new drug candidate may help fight malaria

Malaria killed about 440,000 people - mostly young children - last year, but a new drug candidate discovered at Rutgers may help fight the long-dreaded disease. [More]
Discovery may help researchers identify new ways to attack malaria parasite

Discovery may help researchers identify new ways to attack malaria parasite

New anti-malarial drugs could be developed after researchers discovered a new mechanism used by the malaria parasite when it infects humans. [More]
Researchers identify 124 protein targets of artemisinin in most pathogenic malaria parasite

Researchers identify 124 protein targets of artemisinin in most pathogenic malaria parasite

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has uncovered the mystery behind the potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin, a drug that is considered to be the last line of defence against malaria. Given the emergence of artemisinin resistance, these findings could potentially lead to the design of new treatments against drug-resistant parasites. [More]
NUS scientists uncover mystery behind potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin

NUS scientists uncover mystery behind potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has uncovered the mystery behind the potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin, a drug that is considered to be the last line of defence against malaria. Given the emergence of artemisinin resistance, these findings could potentially lead to the design of new treatments against drug-resistant parasites. [More]

Less effective drugs can help beat malaria more effectively

Oxford University scientists have found that the more effective way to beat malaria is to use less effective drugs some of the time. [More]
Researchers demonstrate new screening model to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria

Researchers demonstrate new screening model to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria

A University of South Florida Center for Global Health & Infectious Diseases Research team has demonstrated a new screening model to classify antimalarial drugs and to identify drug targets for the most lethal strain of malaria, Plasmodium falciparum. [More]
GHIT Fund invests $10.7 million to fight malaria, TB, leishmaniasis and dengue

GHIT Fund invests $10.7 million to fight malaria, TB, leishmaniasis and dengue

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, which in the last two years has invested US$43 million to develop innovative tools for fighting diseases worldwide, today announced it is investing $10.7 million at multiple points in the product development pipeline to seek new interventions for malaria, tuberculosis (TB), leishmaniasis and dengue. [More]
New anti-malarial ‘biobricks' could pave way for easier, cost-effective production of artemisinin drug

New anti-malarial ‘biobricks' could pave way for easier, cost-effective production of artemisinin drug

Students from Trinity College Dublin have successfully created anti-malarial ‘biobricks', which could pave the way for easier and more cost-effective production of the key drug artemisinin. [More]
Malaria death rates reduce by 60% since 2000, shows WHO-UNICEF report

Malaria death rates reduce by 60% since 2000, shows WHO-UNICEF report

Malaria death rates have plunged by 60 per cent since 2000, translating into 6.2 million lives saved, the vast majority of them children, according to a joint WHO-UNICEF report released today. [More]
Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers still prescribing expensive malaria drugs in Nigeria to patients who do not have malaria

Health providers trained to perform malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) are still prescribing valuable malaria medicines to patients who do not have malaria, according to new research published in PLOS ONE. [More]
WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

WHO and health cluster partners cope with health needs of internally displaced persons in South Sudan

The World Health Organization and partners are racing to cope with the health needs of thousands of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in northeastern South Sudan where fighting continues and the humanitarian situation remains dire. [More]
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