Arteriosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Arteriosclerosis News and Research

Arteriosclerosis is a general term describing any hardening (and loss of elasticity) of medium or large arteries.
LMU-led researchers define previously unknown signaling pathway that triggers inflammation

LMU-led researchers define previously unknown signaling pathway that triggers inflammation

Using a combination of newly developed methods, researchers led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich immunologist Veit Hornung have defined a previously unknown pathway that triggers inflammation. [More]
New project aims to prevent complications from drug usage

New project aims to prevent complications from drug usage

If a patient is ill and takes drugs for that illness, these drugs often lead to further illnesses and complications. This affects millions of people throughout the world. [More]
Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia can be treated with balloon angioplasty

Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) can be successfully treated with endovascular therapy such as balloon angioplasty, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. The study also found that AMI is a more common cause of abdominal pain among the elderly than generally thought; however, it is difficult to diagnose before bowel damage develops. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. [More]
Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

In industrialized countries, a particularly high number of people suffer from arteriosclerosis -- with fatal consequences: Deposits in the arteries lead to strokes and heart attacks. A team of researchers under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now developed a method for guiding replacement cells to diseased vascular segments using nanoparticles. [More]
Evolocumab drug offers no added benefit over appropriate comparator therapy

Evolocumab drug offers no added benefit over appropriate comparator therapy

Evolocumab (trade name: Repatha) has been approved since July 2015 for two therapeutic indications: on the one hand, for hypercholesterolaemia or mixed dyslipidaemia, and on the other, for homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia. [More]
World’s first mini synchrotron inaugurated at Technical University of Munich

World’s first mini synchrotron inaugurated at Technical University of Munich

For some years now it has been possible to generate high-brilliance X-rays using ring-shaped particle accelerators. However, such installations are several hundred meters in diameter and cost billions of euros. [More]
New generation of incretin-based medicines allows coordinated action against diabesity

New generation of incretin-based medicines allows coordinated action against diabesity

The new generation of incretin-based medicines will allow a coordinated action against the combination diabetes/obesity, also known as diabesity, in some cases with only a single weekly dose, and with the likelihood of additional beneficial effects on other health complications related to this condition, such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Changes in lifestyle could reduce Alzheimer's disease risk

Changes in lifestyle could reduce Alzheimer's disease risk

Changes in lifestyle could reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. That was the conclusion of a study conducted by researchers of Heidelberg University's Network Aging Research, who examined the data from two independent epidemiological studies. Carriers of the ApoE4 genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's may be able to reduce their increased risk of cognitive decline by reducing their cholesterol level, especially if they also suffer from cardiovascular disease. [More]
Novel radiopharmaceutical probe has potential to save lives of patients with ischemic stroke

Novel radiopharmaceutical probe has potential to save lives of patients with ischemic stroke

A novel radiopharmaceutical probe developed at Massachusetts General Hospital has the potential of providing physicians with information that could save the lives of patients with ischemic stroke or pulmonary embolism - conditions caused when important blood vessels are blocked by a clot that has traveled from another part of the body. [More]
UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

UT System Board of Regents approves new UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center

The University of Texas System Board of Regents has approved establishment of the UT Southwestern Monty and Tex Moncrief Medical Center at Fort Worth, made possible by an extraordinary $25 million commitment from W.A. "Tex" Moncrief Jr. The Center is UT Southwestern's first named campus outside of Dallas. [More]
Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty Radboud researchers receive Veni grant as part of Innovational Research Incentives Scheme

Twenty young and promising researchers from Nijmegen - eleven from Radboud University and nine from Radboudumc - are each to receive up to 250,000. NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) is awarding the Veni grant as part of the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme. [More]
Long, non-coding RNAs play a role in heart attacks, strokes and cancer

Long, non-coding RNAs play a role in heart attacks, strokes and cancer

About 70 percent of our genes provide the blueprint for biomolecules whose function is only now being discovered - non-coding RNAs. Instead of being translated into proteins, they seem to perform steering functions in the body. [More]
New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

New Forsyth Institute study sheds light on connection between the mouth and heart

A new study from the Forsyth Institute is helping to shed more light on the important connection between the mouth and heart. According to research recently published online by the American Heart Association, scientists at Forsyth and Boston University have demonstrated that using an oral topical remedy to reduce inflammation associated with periodontitis, more commonly known as gum disease, also results in the prevention of vascular inflammation and can lower the risk of heart attack. [More]
Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Copenhagen researchers develop secure way of measuring apo-M protein in human blood

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen are the first in the world to develop a secure way of measuring the important protein apo-M. This could prove relevant for research into diseases such as diabetes, arteriosclerosis and sclerosis. [More]
Mediterranean diet improves cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction

Mediterranean diet improves cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction

The Mediterranean diet is linked to improved cardiovascular performance in patients with erectile dysfunction, according to research presented at EuroEcho-Imaging 2014 by Dr Athanasios Angelis from Greece. Patients with erectile dysfunction who had poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet had more vascular and cardiac damage. [More]
New study identifies crizotinib drug as possible new coating for drug-eluting stents

New study identifies crizotinib drug as possible new coating for drug-eluting stents

A new study has identified an FDA approved cancer drug, crizotinib, as a possible new coating for drug-eluting stents. Researchers found that crizotinib in mice helped prevent the narrowing of blood vessels after stenting without affecting the blood vessel lining. [More]
Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

What makes some women more susceptible to heart disease than others? To help answer that question, researchers at Western University's Robarts Research Institute have identified that an estrogen receptor, previously shown to regulate blood pressure in women, also plays an important role in regulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. [More]
Surgical treatment of strabismus can be carried out at any age

Surgical treatment of strabismus can be carried out at any age

Around four per cent of all newborn children have a squint. In about 50 per cent of cases, this can be corrected with appropriate glasses, however the other half require treatment for their squint and in some cases even squint surgery. [More]
Study: Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary heart disease risk

Study: Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary heart disease risk

A recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland shows that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. The sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids include fish, vegetable oils, and nuts. [More]
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