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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Scraped from the gums, teeth and tongue in the form of plaque, the researchers behind Canada's first plaque bank are betting that the bacterial content of plaque will open up a new frontier of medicine. [More]
Researchers explore benefits and risks of biosimilar antibodies

Researchers explore benefits and risks of biosimilar antibodies

In the emerging biosimilar market, biosimilar antibodies are being developed to treat conditions currently addressed by their original, targeted biological therapy. Only a few biosimilars are approved by the EMA, and just one has been approved by the FDA. In a review article, researchers used the clinical development data from one drug to explore the broader benefits and risks of these cost-effective, but as yet unfamiliar treatment options. [More]
Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

Inflammation plays causal role in neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease

About 15% of patients with Lyme disease develop peripheral and central nervous system involvement, often accompanied by debilitating and painful symptoms. New research indicates that inflammation plays a causal role in the array of neurologic changes associated with Lyme disease, according to a study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
DPS Health introduces Virtual Lifestyle Management, forms partnership with Stanford Patient Education Research Center

DPS Health introduces Virtual Lifestyle Management, forms partnership with Stanford Patient Education Research Center

DPS Health, a leader in digital behavior change interventions for emergent-risk populations, announced today the launch of its health self-management solution. Designed for health plans, providers systems and employers that are setting population health strategies for the emergent-risk population – adults with one or more pre-chronic or early-stage chronic conditions – the solution includes multi-channel consumer engagement to educate and enroll populations, Virtual Lifestyle ManagementTM to help individuals embrace healthy lifestyles, and a suite of condition-based, self-management programs to help the same individuals manage the impact of one or more conditions. [More]
OSU study finds that injury prevention programs are not being used in high schools

OSU study finds that injury prevention programs are not being used in high schools

Injury prevention programs can help reduce ankle, knee and other lower extremity injuries in sports, but the programs are not being widely used in high schools, a new study from Oregon State University has found. [More]
Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

Changes in JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway drive ALK-negative ALCL

The first-ever systematic study of the genomes of patients with ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a particularly aggressive form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, shows that many cases of the disease are driven by alterations in the JAK/STAT3 cell signaling pathway. [More]
Osteocyte study in space: Researchers to analyze effects of microgravity on osteocyte cultures

Osteocyte study in space: Researchers to analyze effects of microgravity on osteocyte cultures

Researchers may be "excyted" to learn that osteocyte cultures are headed to the International Space Station this spring for the first time. With their delivery on the next SpaceX commercial resupply services mission this month, the Osteocytes and mechano-transduction (Osteo-4) investigation team will analyze the effects of microgravity on this type of bone cell. [More]
Every third teenager reports one mental disorder, one chronic physical disease

Every third teenager reports one mental disorder, one chronic physical disease

Every third teenager has suffered from one mental disorder and one physical disease. These co-occurrences come in specific associations: More often than average, depression occurs together with diseases of the digestive system, eating disorders with seizures and anxiety disorders together with arthritis, heart disease as well as diseases of the digestives system. [More]
Children who eat certain types of food more likely to contract Epstein-Barr virus

Children who eat certain types of food more likely to contract Epstein-Barr virus

A new study by UNC Charlotte scholars is shedding light on the connection between diet and a common childhood disease. [More]
Scientists identify brain molecule that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes

Scientists identify brain molecule that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a molecule in the brain that triggers schizophrenia-like behaviors, brain changes and global gene expression in an animal model. The research gives scientists new tools for someday preventing or treating psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. [More]
American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

The American Oil Chemists' Society has honored University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist Yeonhwa Park with the Timothy L. Mounts Award for her "significant and important contributions in the area of bioactive lipids and their impact on health conditions such as obesity, osteoporosis, arthritis and cardiovascular disease." [More]
Scientists identify small RNA molecule that can suppress cancer-causing genes in GBM

Scientists identify small RNA molecule that can suppress cancer-causing genes in GBM

Northwestern Medicine scientists have identified a small RNA molecule called miR-182 that can suppress cancer-causing genes in mice with glioblastoma mulitforme (GBM), a deadly and incurable type of brain tumor. [More]
Depression associated with elevated risk for physical diseases

Depression associated with elevated risk for physical diseases

Those suffering from depressive symptoms have an increased risk for physical diseases, especially for arthrosis and arthritis. These findings were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the Ruhr-University Bochum. Their results, based on data from 14,300 people living in Switzerland, have been published in the scientific journal "Frontiers in Public Health". [More]
Antibodies may trigger psychiatric illness in children

Antibodies may trigger psychiatric illness in children

A world first study revealing the presence of two antibodies in a sub-group of children experiencing their first episode of psychosis affirms a longstanding recognition that auto-immune disorders play a significant role in psychiatric illness. [More]
Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have identified a unique pattern of immune molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that provides insights into the basis for cognitive dysfunction--frequently described by patients as "brain fog"--as well as new hope for improvements in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Higher levels of vitamin D decrease pain, improve function in obese patients with osteoarthritis

Got milk? If you are overweight and have osteoarthritis, you may want to bone up on your dairy products that have vitamin D. [More]
Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira announces availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars and the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, announces the availability of INFLECTRA (infliximab) in Canada, the country's first subsequent entry biologic (SEB) monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma's CF101Phase II/III psoriasis trial fails to meet primary endpoint

Can-Fite BioPharma's CF101Phase II/III psoriasis trial fails to meet primary endpoint

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that its Phase II/III psoriasis trial for the Company's drug candidate CF101 did not achieve its primary endpoint. [More]
Pain relief from IA injection may not predict better outcomes following arthroscopic hip surgery

Pain relief from IA injection may not predict better outcomes following arthroscopic hip surgery

How best to treat and recover from complicated hip injuries is a growing field in orthopaedic medicine. While diagnostic hip injections are commonly performed for patients with labral tear to confirm the pain etiology, research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day suggests that pain relief from this diagnostic injection may not predict better outcomes following arthroscopic hip surgery. [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
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