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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Anti-TNF therapy linked to ‘modest’ extra SCC risk

Anti-TNF therapy linked to ‘modest’ extra SCC risk

A Swedish population-based study shows that treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors significantly increases the risk of developing squamous cell carcinoma, but not basal cell carcinoma, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Distinctive gene 'signature' may lead to new way to diagnose Lyme disease

Distinctive gene 'signature' may lead to new way to diagnose Lyme disease

Researchers at UC San Francisco and Johns Hopkins may have found a new way to diagnose Lyme disease, based on a distinctive gene "signature" they discovered in white blood cells of patients infected with the tick-borne bacteria. [More]
Animal study shows link between oxygen-sensing neurons and fat-burning circuit

Animal study shows link between oxygen-sensing neurons and fat-burning circuit

A new study in animal models, led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), is the first to show that oxygen sensing in the brain has a role in metabolism and sensing an organism's internal state. [More]
People who feel older may end up in hospital as they age

People who feel older may end up in hospital as they age

People who feel older than their peers are more likely to be hospitalized as they age, regardless of their actual age or other demographic factors, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. [More]
Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

Drugs designed to curb Rac1 signaling pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers

New research uncovers a cascade of reactions within nerve cells that relay sensations of pain associated with inflammation. The findings, which are published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, indicate that drugs designed to curb this pathway may help relieve inflammatory pain in sufferers. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers discover new bacterial species that triggers Lyme disease in people

Mayo Clinic researchers discover new bacterial species that triggers Lyme disease in people

Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi. [More]
New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

New pain management strategies key to maximizing patient outcomes after TKR procedures

According to a new literature review in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, a team-based care approach (consisting of the patient, family members, the orthopaedic surgeon and other medical practitioners) on total knee replacement (TKR) procedures, in conjunction with newer pain management strategies, is key to maximizing patient outcomes. [More]
Effective treatments for knee instability may help reduce falls in older adults

Effective treatments for knee instability may help reduce falls in older adults

Symptoms of knee instability in older adults may indicate an increased risk of falling and of experiencing the various physical and psychological effects that can result from falling, according to a study published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology. [More]
Intense physical work helped Michelangelo combat arthritis

Intense physical work helped Michelangelo combat arthritis

Prolonged hammering and chiselling accelerated degenerative arthritis in the hands of Michelangelo Buonarroti, sculptor, painter and one of the greatest artists of all time. But the intense work probably helped him keep the use of his hands right up until he died. That is the conclusion of doctors writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine who analysed three portraits of the artist to reach their diagnosis. [More]
African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

African-American patients with connective tissue diseases at risk for cardiovascular disease

A study based on medical records from more than a quarter million adult patients found that African-American patients with connective tissue diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis were twice as likely as white patients to suffer from narrowed or atherosclerotic blood vessels, which increase the risk of a heart attack, stroke or death. [More]
Remicade co-developer funds new microscopy facility on Scripps Florida campus

Remicade co-developer funds new microscopy facility on Scripps Florida campus

The co-developer of Remicade, one of the three top-selling drugs in the world, has donated more than $500,000 to fund what will be known as the Iris and Junming Le Foundation Super-Resolution Microscopy Facility on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute. [More]
TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

TSRI scientists reveal workings of key 'relief-valve' in cells

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has solved a long-standing mystery in cell biology by showing essentially how a key "relief-valve" in cells does its job. [More]
Immune signaling molecule in infected mothers linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring

Immune signaling molecule in infected mothers linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring

In 2010, a large study in Denmark found that women who suffered an infection severe enough to require hospitalization while pregnant were much more likely to have a child with autism (even though the overall risk of delivering a child with autism remained low). [More]
Insights into exosomes role in disease transmission gained using NanoSight from Malvern

Insights into exosomes role in disease transmission gained using NanoSight from Malvern

Data measured using the NanoSight NS300 from Malvern Instruments is providing new insights into the role of exosomes in diseases such as cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and cystic fibrosis, in pioneering research at the University of Alabama - Birmingham (UAB). [More]
Naturally occurring clay exhibits potent antibacterial activity against ESKAPE pathogens

Naturally occurring clay exhibits potent antibacterial activity against ESKAPE pathogens

Naturally occurring clay from British Columbia, Canada -- long used by the region's Heiltsuk First Nation for its healing potential -- exhibits potent antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. [More]
Study throws light on why gout not well managed in many patients

Study throws light on why gout not well managed in many patients

A study published online this month in the Arthritis Care and Research journal is shedding light on why gout, a painful and common form of arthritis, is not well managed in many patients. The journal is published by the American College of Rheumatology. [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists solve atomic structure of ubiquitin ligase complex that plays key role in protein degradation

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have solved the atomic structure of a unique ubiquitin ligase complex. Ubiquitin is best known for its role in protein degradation, but more recently seen as important for cell signaling, DNA repair, anti-inflammatory, and immune responses. [More]
Genetics play vital role in knee pain sensitivity

Genetics play vital role in knee pain sensitivity

Genetics play a key role in knee pain sensitivity, according to a team of researchers studying knee osteoarthritis patients. [More]
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