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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO launches new cell lines and controls for PD-1 research

AMSBIO has introduced new cell lines and controls for Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) research, and to test inhibitors of the PD-1 / PD-L1 pathway. [More]
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

Study reveals surprising diversity in single neuronal transcriptomes of the brain

A team of scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, University of California, San Diego and Illumina, Inc., has completed the first large-scale assessment of single neuronal "transcriptomes." [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

ACP provides physician perspective on rising prescription drug prices

The American College of Physicians today provided physician perspective on the escalating cost of prescription drugs, the impact of the costs on internal medicine physicians and their patients, and support for the intent of the bipartisan Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016 to reduce anti-competitive practices. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Tumors are composed of many subpopulations of cells. A general consensus among scientists is that these subpopulations are due to random mutations. However, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers found that these assumptions may be incorrect. [More]

Hip arthroscopy for FAI shows slightly varied outcomes based on patient's age and sex

A new study by Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush surgeons found both male and female patients did well after having arthroscopic surgery for painful hip impingement, but outcomes varied slightly depending on a patient's age and sex. [More]
Vitamin D supplementation may not heal all health problems

Vitamin D supplementation may not heal all health problems

As Canadians prepare for long summer days in the sun, a new publication is shedding light on the suggested medical benefits of a nutrient that comes with the sun's rays: vitamin D. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
New survey shows how patients use social media to gain better understanding of health condition

New survey shows how patients use social media to gain better understanding of health condition

A new survey from Health Union of more than 2,200 people with chronic health conditions and their caregivers illustrates how patients use online health information to better understand their health condition, learn about symptoms and treatment, and share experiences with other patients living with the same health condition. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

TSRI scientists develop novel technique for finding drug candidates

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new method for finding drug candidates that bind to specific proteins. [More]
Study finds high prevalence of suicide attempts among arthritis patients

Study finds high prevalence of suicide attempts among arthritis patients

One in every 26 men with arthritis have attempted suicide compared to one in 50 men without arthritis. Women with arthritis also had a higher prevalence of lifetime suicide attempts than women without arthritis (5.3% vs 3.2%), according to a recent study from the University of Toronto. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
Factors other than just cost may influence prescribing of TNF inhibitors for RA patients

Factors other than just cost may influence prescribing of TNF inhibitors for RA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that a range of factors other than just cost may influence the prescribing of TNF inhibitors for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

The results of a UK study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that busing Facebook to raise awareness about the symptoms of Inflammatory Back Pain (IBP) and the need to seek medical help early may reduce the delay in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Surgeons take first step towards eliminating surgical care disparities

Surgeons take first step towards eliminating surgical care disparities

Surgeons and researchers, responding to the known prevalence of inequalities in U.S. surgical care, have taken the first steps toward eliminating surgical care disparities by grouping their causes into themes and identifying modifiable contributing factors. [More]
Study sheds light on why many RA patients do not adhere to treatment

Study sheds light on why many RA patients do not adhere to treatment

Two new studies presented at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress have shed light on why so many patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) do not adhere to their therapy, even in the early stages of their treatment. [More]
Sexual dysfunction prevalent among RA patients

Sexual dysfunction prevalent among RA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that sexual dysfunction is present in more than one-third of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are still sexually active, both men and women. [More]
Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

Behavioural intervention could be effective way to improve health of RA patients

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed for the first time that a combination of text messages and individual counselling sessions to motivate patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) to be more active resulted in improved patient-reported clinical outcomes. [More]
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