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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Using a novel approach for imaging the movement of immune cells in living animals, researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases have identified what appear to be the initial steps leading to joint inflammation in a model of inflammatory arthritis. [More]
Scientists identify 'molecular barcode' in blood samples that can predict survival of Ebola patients

Scientists identify 'molecular barcode' in blood samples that can predict survival of Ebola patients

Scientists have identified a 'molecular barcode' in the blood of patients with Ebola virus disease that can predict whether they are likely to survive or die from the viral infection. [More]
Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Chronic kidney disease patients have high out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures, study finds

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and Loyola Medicine. [More]
Analgesic effects of opioids can be mediated via immune cells

Analgesic effects of opioids can be mediated via immune cells

Opioids are the most powerful painkillers. Researchers at the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now found that the analgesic effects of opioids are not exclusively mediated by opioid receptors in the brain, but can also be mediated via the activation of receptors in immune cells. [More]
New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. [More]
Chair yoga may be effective approach to reduce osteoarthritis pain in older adults, study shows

Chair yoga may be effective approach to reduce osteoarthritis pain in older adults, study shows

For the millions of older adults who suffer from osteoarthritis in their lower extremities (hip, knee, ankle or foot), chair yoga is proving to be an effective way to reduce pain and improve quality of life while avoiding pharmacologic treatment or adverse events. [More]
Weather conditions play no part in symptoms linked to back pain or osteoarthritis

Weather conditions play no part in symptoms linked to back pain or osteoarthritis

New research from The George Institute for Global Health has revealed the weather plays no part in the symptoms associated with either back pain or osteoarthritis. [More]
SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

SLU expert suggests viewing exercise as daily contribution that offers cumulative health benefits

Have you already faltered on your New Year's resolution to exercise regularly in 2017? Joined a gym, but only worked out two days so far? New workout gear still neatly folded with tags attached? Don't give up your admirable ambition just yet. Instead, consider a new attitude to refocus your approach toward your exercise goal. [More]
Older arthritis patients need 45 minutes of moderate activity per week to remain functional, study finds

Older arthritis patients need 45 minutes of moderate activity per week to remain functional, study finds

Older adults who suffer from arthritis need to keep moving to be functionally independent. [More]
Scientists develop 3-D organoid to unravel immune response during infection

Scientists develop 3-D organoid to unravel immune response during infection

What if you could design an adaptable, biomaterials-based model of an organ to track its immune response to any number of maladies, including cancer, transplant rejection and the Zika virus? The lab of Ankur Singh, assistant professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, has asked - and begun to answer - that very question. [More]
Georgia Tech researchers find new way to improve treatment for inflammatory diseases

Georgia Tech researchers find new way to improve treatment for inflammatory diseases

Is a treatment only making things better or maybe also making some things a little worse? That can be a nagging question in some medical decisions, where side effects are possible. [More]
TSRI biologists uncover new mechanism behind sense of touch

TSRI biologists uncover new mechanism behind sense of touch

Biologists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a new mechanism that likely underlies how we feel force or touch. Their study suggests that "rafts" of fatty lipids on the cell surface act as compartments to keep certain enzymes from mixing with their binding partners. [More]
Genetic influence on immune system appears to be higher than previously thought

Genetic influence on immune system appears to be higher than previously thought

Nearly three quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes, new research from King's College London reveals. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new tool to uncover molecular details of protein structure

TSRI scientists develop new tool to uncover molecular details of protein structure

Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have developed a new tool for studying the molecular details of protein structure. [More]
Researchers uncover two factors that play crucial role in chronic autoimmune disorders

Researchers uncover two factors that play crucial role in chronic autoimmune disorders

Researchers from Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear have uncovered two factors responsible for the chronic, lifelong nature of autoimmune disorders, which tend to "flare up" intermittently in affected patients. [More]
High-fiber diet may inhibit gout-related inflammation

High-fiber diet may inhibit gout-related inflammation

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, shows that a high-fiber diet likely inhibits gout-related inflammation caused by monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. [More]
New TSRI study sheds light on how the brain stores memories

New TSRI study sheds light on how the brain stores memories

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) sheds light on how the brain stores memories. [More]
Powerful version of anti-inflammatory molecule may help protect vision in diabetic retinopathy

Powerful version of anti-inflammatory molecule may help protect vision in diabetic retinopathy

A more powerful version of an anti-inflammatory molecule already circulating in our blood may help protect our vision in the face of diabetes. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new approach for understanding diverse effects of endocrine-disruptors

TSRI scientists develop new approach for understanding diverse effects of endocrine-disruptors

Breast cancer researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a novel approach for identifying how chemicals in the environment--called environmental estrogens--can produce infertility, abnormal reproductive development, including "precocious puberty," and promote breast cancer. [More]
A new strategy to fight prostate cancer

A new strategy to fight prostate cancer

A new study led by scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) sheds light on a signaling circuit in cells that drives therapy resistance in prostate cancer. [More]
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