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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes-alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures-in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. [More]
Race and ethnicity influence outcomes of patients with motor complete SCI

Race and ethnicity influence outcomes of patients with motor complete SCI

Researchers have published a study examining racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). The article, "Racial and ethnic disparities in functioning at discharge and follow-up among patients with motor complete SCI," was published online ahead of print on August 2 by the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. [More]
Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level NSAIDs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects. [More]
Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. [More]
Lilly’s ixekizumab superior to placebo, etanercept on all skin clearance measures in Phase 3 studies

Lilly’s ixekizumab superior to placebo, etanercept on all skin clearance measures in Phase 3 studies

Eli Lilly and Company's investigational medicine ixekizumab was statistically superior to etanercept and placebo on all skin clearance measures in Phase 3 studies, the company said today in disclosing top-line results from its pivotal UNCOVER studies in moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]
Glenmark announces discovery and initiation of IND enabling studies of innovative bispecific antibody

Glenmark announces discovery and initiation of IND enabling studies of innovative bispecific antibody

Glenmark Pharmaceuticals S.A. (GPSA), a wholly owned subsidiary of Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Limited India (GPL), announces the discovery and initiation of IND enabling studies of a novel clinical development candidate, GBR 1302, a HER2xCD3 bispecific antibody. [More]
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
AMGF participates in collaborative effort to find best practices in managing RA patients

AMGF participates in collaborative effort to find best practices in managing RA patients

The American Medical Group Foundation today announced participants in a collaborative dedicated to finding best practices in managing patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
Decision Resources expands disease-level coverage of Treatment Algorithms Insight Series

Decision Resources expands disease-level coverage of Treatment Algorithms Insight Series

Decision Resources has expanded its disease-level coverage of the Treatment Algorithms Insight Series, which examines U.S. physicians' prescribing behavior, to provide a quantitative analysis of an agent's penetration into each line of therapy. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of smaller practices; Rx price growth; fixing Medicare claims reviews

Research roundup: Benefits of smaller practices; Rx price growth; fixing Medicare claims reviews

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services within the Department of Health and Human Services has taken steps to prevent its contractors from conducting certain duplicative postpayment claims reviews-;reviews of the same claims that are not permitted by the agency-;but CMS neither has reliable data nor provides sufficient oversight and guidance to measure and fully prevent duplication. [More]
Research shows new drug candidate can stop tumor growth in animal models

Research shows new drug candidate can stop tumor growth in animal models

It's a trick any cat burglar knows: to open a locked door, slide a credit card past the latch. Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) tried a similar strategy when they attempted to disrupt the function of MYC, a cancer regulator thought to be "undruggable." [More]
Experts examine how molecule in parasitic worms can effectively treat autoimmune diseases

Experts examine how molecule in parasitic worms can effectively treat autoimmune diseases

Experts believe a molecule in parasitic worms could help explain why worm infections can effectively treat a range of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. [More]
Antimalarial agent chloroquine normalizes abnormal tumor blood vessels

Antimalarial agent chloroquine normalizes abnormal tumor blood vessels

A recent study by investigators at VIB and KU Leuven has demonstrated that chloroquine also normalizes the abnormal blood vessels in tumors. This blood vessel normalization results in an increased barrier function on the one hand -- thereby blocking cancer cell dissemination and metastasis -- and in enhanced tumor perfusion on the other hand, which increases the response of the tumor to chemotherapy. [More]
Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

Black and Hispanic SLE patients are more likely to be readmitted than white patients

A new study reveals that one in six patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of being discharged. [More]
European Commission approves EYLEA Injection for treatment of visual impairment due to DME

European Commission approves EYLEA Injection for treatment of visual impairment due to DME

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that EYLEA® (aflibercept) Injection has been approved by the European Commission for the treatment of visual impairment due to Diabetic Macular Edema. [More]
3SBio enters into exclusive license with DiNonA for development of Leukotuximab

3SBio enters into exclusive license with DiNonA for development of Leukotuximab

3SBio Inc., a leading China-based biotechnology company focused on researching, developing, manufacturing and marketing biopharmaceutical products, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with DiNonA Inc. for the development, manufacturing and marketing of Leukotuximab, an anti JL-1 antibody for acute leukemia (AL), including acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), in the territory of Greater China (including Mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau) and the Middle East (excluding Cyprus, Egypt, Israel and Turkey). [More]
Idera collaborates with TMA to advance new potential treatment approach for myositis

Idera collaborates with TMA to advance new potential treatment approach for myositis

Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing nucleic acid therapeutics for patients with cancer and rare diseases, and The Myositis Association (TMA), the only nonprofit organization dedicated to solely serving all patients with inflammatory myopathies, today announced a collaboration to advance a new potential treatment approach for polymyositis and dermatomyositis known as Toll-like receptor (TLR) antagonism. [More]
Novel therapy takes rheumatoid arthritis treatment in mice to a new level

Novel therapy takes rheumatoid arthritis treatment in mice to a new level

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that causes painful inflammation of several joints in the body. The joint capsule becomes swollen, and the disease can also destroy cartilage and bone as it progresses. Rheumatoid arthritis affects 0.5% to 1% of the world's population. Up to this point, doctors have used various drugs to slow or stop the progression of the disease. [More]
Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

Drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can improve health of kidney transplant recipients

UC San Francisco is the lead institution on a new seven-year, $17 million multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health to determine if certain immune system cells and/or a drug now used for treating rheumatoid arthritis can be effective in improving and maintaining the long-term health of kidney transplant recipients. [More]