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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Research: Some immune cells convert into cells that trigger disease

Research: Some immune cells convert into cells that trigger disease

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine have unraveled one of the mysteries of how a small group of immune cells work: That some inflammation-fighting immune cells may actually convert into cells that trigger disease. [More]
Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Chemical compound shows promise in treating rheumatoid arthritis

Montana State University researchers and their collaborators have published their findings about a chemical compound that shows potential for treating rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
SARIL-RA-TARGET trial: Sarilumab meets co-primary efficacy endpoints in RA patients

SARIL-RA-TARGET trial: Sarilumab meets co-primary efficacy endpoints in RA patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi announced today that a Phase 3 study of sarilumab, an investigational, fully human IL-6 receptor antibody, met its co-primary efficacy endpoints of a greater improvement in signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at 24 weeks and physical function at 12 weeks, compared to placebo. [More]
Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Novel drug target identified for treating rheumatoid arthritis

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, in collaboration with colleagues the University of California, San Diego, identified a novel drug target for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis that focuses on the cells that are directly responsible for the cartilage damage in affected joints. [More]

New data shows safety and efficacy of biosimilar infliximab treatment in IBD patients

Clinical experience of biosimilar infliximab in 78 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW) 2015 in Washington D.C. showed that the treatment is comparable to the reference medicinal product (RMP) in terms of efficacy and safety. [More]
Short course of oral steroids unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with acute sciatica

Short course of oral steroids unlikely to provide much benefit for patients with acute sciatica

Among patients with acute sciatica caused by a herniated lumbar disk (a condition also known as "acute radiculopathy"), a short course of oral steroids resulted in only modest improvement in function and no significant improvement in pain, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Lakewood-Amedex's novel class of antimicrobials prove effective at killing MDR-TB strains

Lakewood-Amedex's novel class of antimicrobials prove effective at killing MDR-TB strains

Lakewood-Amedex Inc., a leading developer of novel anti-infective pharmaceuticals, announced today that a recent series of in vitro studies conducted by Southern Research in Birmingham, Alabama, have demonstrated that its novel class of antimicrobials, named bisphosphocins, have proven effective at killing multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria responsible for the chronic lung infection tuberculosis. [More]
Researchers uncover major link between human body clock and immune system

Researchers uncover major link between human body clock and immune system

An important link between the human body clock and the immune system has relevance for better understanding inflammatory and infectious diseases, discovered collaborators at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Trinity College, Dublin. [More]
UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB sponsoring several presentations on Cimzia for Crohn's disease at DDW 2015

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company focusing on immunology and neurology treatment and research, is sponsoring several data presentations on Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) at Digestive Disease Week 2015, taking place in Washington, DC from May 16-19. [More]
Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the research arm of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and SetPoint Medical Inc., a biomedical technology company, today released the results of research on the therapeutic potential of vagus nerve stimulation. In a paper published by Bioelectronic Medicine, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, and his colleagues at the Feinstein Institute, explore how low-level electrical stimulation interacts with the body's nerves to reduce inflammation, a fundamental goal of bioelectronic medicine. [More]
Regulatory T cells can cure inflammatory diseases, shows research

Regulatory T cells can cure inflammatory diseases, shows research

Scientists at The University of Manchester have made an important discovery about an immune cell which is already being used in immunotherapy to treat diseases such as type I diabetes. [More]
Health workers now have rapid test to detect presence of chikungunya virus within an hour

Health workers now have rapid test to detect presence of chikungunya virus within an hour

Scientists at a U.S. Army research center have modified an assay that tests whether or not a sample of mosquitoes harbors the virus responsible for the disease known as chikungunya (CHIKV), long a problem in the Old World tropics but recently established in the Americas. [More]
Can-Fite receives EMA clearance to begin CF102 Phase II trial for treatment of HCC patients in Europe

Can-Fite receives EMA clearance to begin CF102 Phase II trial for treatment of HCC patients in Europe

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, today announced it recently received clearance from the European Medicines Agency to commence dosing patients in Europe in its global Phase II trial for CF102 in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. [More]
Global survey finds gap in physicians' understanding on impact of lupus on patients' lives

Global survey finds gap in physicians' understanding on impact of lupus on patients' lives

As many people in the lupus community prepare to come together in support of World Lupus Day (May 10), a global survey shows that systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have difficulty describing their symptoms to their physicians, which leads to a gap in physicians understanding the full impact the illness has on patients' lives. [More]
Overexpression of cyclin E protein could lead to breast cancer, leukemia

Overexpression of cyclin E protein could lead to breast cancer, leukemia

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute sheds light on the cause of some cancers, including breast cancer and leukemia. [More]
Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has uncovered a big clue to how bacteria may promote some colon cancers. [More]
Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff scientists develop novel anti-cancer stem cell compound

Cardiff University scientists have developed a novel anti-cancer stem cell agent capable of targeting aggressive tumour forming cells common to breast, pancreas, colon and prostate cancers. [More]
Study shows that periodontal treatment can reduce symptoms of prostatitis

Study shows that periodontal treatment can reduce symptoms of prostatitis

Treating gum disease reduced symptoms of prostate inflammation, called prostatitis, report researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center. [More]
Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Study: Rheumatoid arthritis nearly doubles risk of surprise heart attack

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of a surprise heart attack, according to new research presented today at ICNC 12 by Dr Adriana Puente, a cardiologist in the National Medical Centre "20 de Noviembre" ISSSTE in Mexico City, Mexico. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism responsible for steroid resistance in leukemia patients

Researchers identify mechanism responsible for steroid resistance in leukemia patients

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified a mechanism that helps leukemia cells resist glucocorticoids, a finding that lays the foundation for more effective treatment of cancer and possibly a host of autoimmune diseases. [More]
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