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Many people start to feel pain and stiffness in their bodies over time. Sometimes their hands or knees or shoulders get sore and are hard to move and may become swollen. These people may have arthritis. Arthritis may be caused by inflammation of the tissue lining the joints. Some signs of inflammation include redness, heat, pain, and swelling. These problems are telling you that something is wrong. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, in some types of arthritis but not in all, the joints involved can become severely damaged. There are different types of arthritis. In some diseases in which arthritis occurs, other organs, such as your eyes, your chest, or your skin, can also be affected. Some people may worry that arthritis means they won’t be able to work or take care of their children and their family. Others think that you just have to accept things like arthritis.
Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

Study suggests ovary removal to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in premenopausal women

A Mayo Clinic research team has found evidence suggesting that the controversial practice of ovary removal in premenopausal women to prevent ovarian cancer should be discontinued in women who are not at high risk of cancer. [More]
Nanoparticle injections may help prevent cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis patients

Nanoparticle injections may help prevent cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis patients

Osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition that affects at least 27 million people in the United States, and at least 12 percent of osteoarthritis cases stem from earlier injuries. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

FDA approves new biosimilar for multiple inflammatory diseases

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Amjevita (adalimumab-atto) as a biosimilar to Humira (adalimumab) for multiple inflammatory diseases. [More]
Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

Ludwig researchers shed more light on key requirement for function of regulatory T cells

A Ludwig Cancer Research study published online September 5th in Nature Immunology illuminates a key requirement for the function of regulatory T cells—immune cells that play a critical role in many biological processes, from suppressing inflammation and deadly autoimmunity to helping tumors evade immune attack. [More]
JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

JAK inhibitors may be first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata

Seventy-five percent of patients with moderate to severe alopecia areata—an autoimmune disease that causes patchy, and less frequently, total hair loss—had significant hair regrowth after treatment with ruxolitinib, reported researchers from Columbia University Medical Center. By the end of their treatment, average hair regrowth was 92 percent. [More]
Scientists create new scale to measure beliefs about sleep and pain in long-term pain patients

Scientists create new scale to measure beliefs about sleep and pain in long-term pain patients

'I won't be able to cope with my pain if I don't sleep well' - research from the University of Warwick reveals that the way chronic pain patients think about pain and sleep leads to insomnia and poor management of pain. [More]
Study suggests interactions between distant DNA regions may impact disease gene levels

Study suggests interactions between distant DNA regions may impact disease gene levels

A person's DNA sequence can provide a lot of information about how genes are turned on and off, but new research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine suggests the 3-D structure DNA forms as it crams into cells may provide an additional layer of gene control. [More]
Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women

Predominance of testosterone in males may explain disparate ACL injury rate between men and women

In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees. [More]
Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

Stressful event appears to erase benefits linked to healthy fat choices

The type of fat you eat matters, but a new study suggests that the benefits of good fats vanish when stress enters the picture. [More]
Research findings may help better understand genetic origins of Familial Mediterranean Fever

Research findings may help better understand genetic origins of Familial Mediterranean Fever

A team of scientists led by Stony Brook University researchers have discovered a new mechanism for a bacterial toxin to inhibit inflammation. [More]
TSRI researchers find potential new weapon to combat C. difficile infections

TSRI researchers find potential new weapon to combat C. difficile infections

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a potential new weapon against Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that causes hundreds of thousands of severe intestinal infections in the U.S. every year and is frequently fatal. [More]
X-rays can be effective diagnostic tool for screening knee pain in patients older than 40

X-rays can be effective diagnostic tool for screening knee pain in patients older than 40

Knee pain is common among Americans age 40 and up. Nearly 1 in 17 people visit doctors' offices each year for knee pain or injuries from osteoarthritis--a progressive "wear and tear" disease of the joints. [More]
Triptolide molecule can turn into 'cruise missile' against cancer

Triptolide molecule can turn into 'cruise missile' against cancer

More than 20 years ago, a billboard in China piqued the interest of a chemical biologist. It endorsed an extract from the plant known as the “thunder god vine” as an immunosuppressant. [More]
Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Researchers reveal potential therapeutic treatment for alphavirus infections

Research conducted by Griffith University and Melbourne-based company Paradigm Biopharmaceuticals Limited has uncovered a potential new therapeutic treatment for the global battle against mosquito-borne alphavirus infections, including the debilitating Ross River Virus (RRV) and Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV). [More]
Patients with noninfectious uveitis can get effective treatment from corticosteroid alternative

Patients with noninfectious uveitis can get effective treatment from corticosteroid alternative

Patients suffering from noninfectious uveitis, a group of diseases that causes eye inflammation, can get effective treatment from a corticosteroid alternative that has previously been approved for treatment of arthritis and Crohn's disease, according to a study led by a Duke Health researcher. [More]
Researchers discover risk factors that contribute to fracture nonunion in adults

Researchers discover risk factors that contribute to fracture nonunion in adults

Dr. Robert Zura, the Robert D'Ambrosia Professor and Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of a research team that identified risk factors which may help orthopaedic surgeons better predict a serious complication of bone fractures. [More]
Montreal-based researchers get closer to achieving healthy longevity

Montreal-based researchers get closer to achieving healthy longevity

Hearing loss, brittle bones, sagging skin, a deteriorating mind: these are just some of the issues associated with growing old. [More]
Enhanced communication and coordination of care can provide health benefits for lupus patients

Enhanced communication and coordination of care can provide health benefits for lupus patients

Results from a recent study suggest that improved communication and coordination of care between patients, physicians, and health insurers can provide important health benefits for patients with lupus. [More]
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