Aspirin News and Research RSS Feed - Aspirin News and Research

Aspirin also known as acetylsalicylic acid is a salicylate drug, often used as an analgesic to relieve minor aches and pains, as an antipyretic to reduce fever, and as an anti-inflammatory medication. Aspirin also has an antiplatelet, or "anti-clotting", effect and is used in long-term, low doses to prevent heart attacks, strokes and blood clot formation in people at high risk for developing blood clots. It has also been established that low doses of aspirin may be given immediately after a heart attack to reduce the risk of another heart attack or of the death of cardiac tissue.
CKD status does not affect health status outcomes after AMI

CKD status does not affect health status outcomes after AMI

Chronic kidney disease does not accentuate the decline in health status often experienced by patients after acute myocardial infarction, US study data show. [More]
Bone marrow transplantation dose may have lasting effects on HSC behavior

Bone marrow transplantation dose may have lasting effects on HSC behavior

Unlike aspirin, bone marrow doesn't come with a neatly printed label with dosage instructions. However, a new study published in Cell Reports provides clues about how the dose of transplanted bone marrow might affect patients undergoing this risky procedure, frequently used to treat cancer and blood diseases. [More]
Early aspirin benefits after minor stroke 'underestimated'

Early aspirin benefits after minor stroke 'underestimated'

A meta-analysis of individual patient data has thrown light on the benefits of aspirin for secondary prevention in patients with ischaemic stroke. [More]
Mini-stroke should immediately be treated with aspirin, recommend researchers

Mini-stroke should immediately be treated with aspirin, recommend researchers

Taking aspirin immediately after experiencing stroke-like symptoms could significantly reduce the risk of a major stroke occurring in the next few days, according to a study published in The Lancet. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

New analyses presented at the American Thoracic Society’s 2016 annual conference (ATS 2016) further add to the efficacy and safety profile of OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Computerized decision support tool can assist physicians in prescribing stroke prevention therapy

Computerized decision support tool can assist physicians in prescribing stroke prevention therapy

Physician-researchers in the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati have developed a computerized decision support tool that uses a combination of patient information and characteristics to assist physicians and patients with decisions about blood thinning treatment to prevent strokes in individuals with atrial fibrillation. [More]
Long-term Warfarin use may increase dementia rates in AF patients

Long-term Warfarin use may increase dementia rates in AF patients

A new study of more than 10,000 patients treated long term with the blood thinner, Warfarin, reveals higher rates of dementia for patients with atrial fibrillation versus non-AF patients [More]
Study confirms under-utilization of medication in patients after bypass surgery

Study confirms under-utilization of medication in patients after bypass surgery

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University discovered that nearly half of coronary artery bypass patients are not taking statins and aspirin together when they are referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization at least three years after their initial bypass. Their results are currently in press online in the American Journal of Cardiology. [More]
Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The research team, led by scientists at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom and including representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado, identified more than 5,600 lipids — or fats — in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin. [More]
Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular aspirin use may help reduce risk of bile duct cancer

Regular use of aspirin was linked with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma, in a recent study. The findings, which are published in the journal Hepatology, indicate that additional research on the potential of aspirin for preventing bile duct cancer is warranted. [More]
Aspirin use linked with reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer

Aspirin use linked with reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer

A team of current and former Mayo Clinic researchers has discovered that aspirin use is associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing bile duct cancer, also called cholangiocarcinoma. The results are published in Hepatology. [More]
Aspirin resistance signals increased stroke severity

Aspirin resistance signals increased stroke severity

Stroke severity and infarct volume are significantly increased among patients who become resistant to aspirin, show study findings published in Neurology. [More]
Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

Four commonly used medications to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be safe

According to doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, medications and treatments long considered safe to treat pregnant women with migraines may not be. [More]
Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Middle-aged black women have higher levels of a protein in their blood associated with a predictor of heart disease than their white counterparts, even after other factors, such as obesity, are taken into consideration, according to a study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine. [More]
New tool may help clinicians provide more personalized treatment strategies following coronary stent procedures

New tool may help clinicians provide more personalized treatment strategies following coronary stent procedures

Nearly 1 million people in the United States receive coronary artery stents each year. Nearly all stent patients are expected to take dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) using the combination of aspirin and a second antiplatelet medication to prevent the formation of blood clots. Exactly how long patients should receive DAPT has been debatable. [More]
Researchers discover human equivalent DAMP protein in plants

Researchers discover human equivalent DAMP protein in plants

A protein that signals tissue damage to the human immune system has a counterpart that plays a similar role in plants, report researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute. [More]
Research shows women have more risk factors for heart disease

Research shows women have more risk factors for heart disease

Despite messages to the contrary, most women being seen by a doctor for the first time with suspected heart disease actually experience the same classic symptoms as men, notably chest pain and shortness of breath, according to a study led by the Duke Clinical Research Institute. [More]
Aralez resubmits NDA package for YOSPRALA to FDA

Aralez resubmits NDA package for YOSPRALA to FDA

Aralez Pharmaceuticals Inc., a global specialty pharmaceutical company, today announced that it has resubmitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration the New Drug Application ("NDA") for its investigational candidate, YOSPRALA (PA32540/PA8140) for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients at risk for aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. [More]
Researchers exploring ways to prevent radiation-induced cancer risk in astronauts

Researchers exploring ways to prevent radiation-induced cancer risk in astronauts

NASA limits an astronaut's radiation exposures to doses that keep their added risk of fatal cancer below 3 percent. Unfortunately, that ceiling restricts the time an astronaut may spend in space, which in turn restricts the ability to perform longer missions, say a mission to Mars. [More]
Regular use of aspirin significantly reduces overall cancer risk

Regular use of aspirin significantly reduces overall cancer risk

An analysis of data from two major, long-term epidemiologic studies finds that the regular use of aspirin significantly reduces the overall risk of cancer, a reduction that primarily reflects a lower risk of colorectal cancer and other tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
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