Atherosclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Atherosclerosis News and Research

Atherosclerosis is the progressive buildup of plaque - the fatty deposits and other cells - in the inner walls of the arteries. The condition is a consequence of elevated cholesterol and for many it's a silent disease, with no visible signs or symptoms. The disease can begin in early adulthood and continues to progress for the rest of a person's life. Despite the serious nature of atherosclerosis, many people do not understand how it develops and progresses.
New biobank initiative may help unlock some of the mysteries linked to Down syndrome

New biobank initiative may help unlock some of the mysteries linked to Down syndrome

Nationwide Children's Hospital and research advocacy group DownSyndrome Achieves have joined forces to create the first biobank in the country dedicated to collecting and managing blood samples from people with Down syndrome. [More]
Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer may up Alzheimer's disease risk

Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer may up Alzheimer's disease risk

Men taking androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer were almost twice as likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the years that followed than those who didn't undergo the therapy, an analysis of medical records from two large hospital systems by Penn Medicine and Stanford University researchers has shown. [More]
Macrophages play key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation

Macrophages play key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation

Researchers from the University of Toronto have found that a specific cell type plays a key role in maintaining healthy arteries after inflammation. It's a discovery that could provide treatment options for cardiovascular disease -- one of the leading causes of death in Canada. [More]
NEK7 enzyme acts as on-off switch in innate immune system

NEK7 enzyme acts as on-off switch in innate immune system

UT Southwestern Medical Center and California researchers today provide the first report that an enzyme previously known solely for its role in cell division also acts as an on-off switch in the innate immune system -- the body's first defense against infection. [More]
New model of arterial thrombus formation is similar to popular video game

New model of arterial thrombus formation is similar to popular video game

A group of biophysicists, including representatives from MIPT, has developed a mathematical model of arterial thrombus formation, which is the main cause of heart attacks and strokes. [More]
Mind-body medicine can ward off more heart attacks compared to conventional prevention programs

Mind-body medicine can ward off more heart attacks compared to conventional prevention programs

Mind-body medicine (MBM) is a holistic approach that has the potential to ward off more heart attacks than conventional prevention programs. That is the conclusion reached by Holger Cramer and colleagues in a systematic review and meta-analysis presented in the latest issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2015; 112: 759-67). [More]
Study: Mother Nature may help lower cholesterol levels in pregnant women

Study: Mother Nature may help lower cholesterol levels in pregnant women

When it comes to effective solutions for lowering cholesterol levels in pregnant women, Mother Nature may know best. [More]
Ultrasound can help identify patients at increased risk of future stroke

Ultrasound can help identify patients at increased risk of future stroke

Ultrasound, a non-invasive technique commonly used to study the presence of atherosclerosis disease in blood vessels, can be used to identify patients at increased risk of future stroke who could benefit from surgery. Since surgical treatment to prevent stroke is only considered beneficial to some, ultrasound can prove useful in preventing unnecessary surgical intervention, new research at Umeå University in Sweden shows. [More]
Negative impact of high-fat diet on red blood cells may promote development of cardiovascular disease

Negative impact of high-fat diet on red blood cells may promote development of cardiovascular disease

University of Cincinnati researchers have discovered the negative impact a high fat diet has on red blood cells and how these cells, in turn, promote the development of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Research identifies liver pathway that contributes to negative effects of high-fat, high-cholesterol junk food diet

Research identifies liver pathway that contributes to negative effects of high-fat, high-cholesterol junk food diet

It's no secret that a high-fat, high-cholesterol "junk food" diet has been linked to major health problems, including high blood cholesterol and the buildup of plaques in the arteries, known as atherosclerosis. [More]
Researchers find molecular mechanism that may be responsible for development of amyloidoses

Researchers find molecular mechanism that may be responsible for development of amyloidoses

A team of local researchers has proposed a molecular mechanism that may be responsible for the development of life-threatening diseases called amyloidoses. The best known of such diseases is Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there are many others that are receiving increased scrutiny, in part because of mounting evidence linking them to atherosclerosis and aging. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Johns Hopkins researchers present new healthcare tips from American Heart Association Meeting

Linking digital activity trackers to smartphones and periodically pinging users with personalized texts that urge them to walk more can significantly increase physical activity levels and spark healthy behavior changes, according to findings of a pilot study conducted at Johns Hopkins. [More]
UT Southwestern's Helen H. Hobbs named recipient of Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

UT Southwestern's Helen H. Hobbs named recipient of Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

UT Southwestern Medical Center geneticist Dr. Helen H. Hobbs is the 2016 recipient of the prestigious Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. [More]
New treatment may help patients with chronic renovascular disease

New treatment may help patients with chronic renovascular disease

A new treatment may help patients with a chronic kidney condition that can also lead to heart problems and premature death, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). [More]
APOE ε4 predicts risk of future depression

APOE ε4 predicts risk of future depression

One of the most powerful predictors in neuropsychiatry is the epsilon 4 (ε4) allele of the apolipoprotein gene (APOE). [More]
Federal food policy changes boost healthful food options at smaller urban corner stores

Federal food policy changes boost healthful food options at smaller urban corner stores

Federal food policy changes led to increased availability of healthy foods at smaller urban corner stores in Baltimore, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. Increases in healthy food were greatest in corner stores and in neighborhoods with a majority of black residents. [More]
Diet diversity associated with lower diet quality and worse metabolic health

Diet diversity associated with lower diet quality and worse metabolic health

Diet diversity, as defined by less similarity among the foods people eat, may be linked to lower diet quality and worse metabolic health, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. [More]
Liposomal sizing and the Coulter principle: an interview with Professor Melvin E. Klegerman

Liposomal sizing and the Coulter principle: an interview with Professor Melvin E. Klegerman

For about the last 25 years, the cardiology group here have been developing a platform technology for both the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis. The group began at Northwestern University, Chicago, under the direction of Dr. David McPherson and he continues to lead the group. [More]
Four microRNAs appear to play critical roles in controlling cholesterol, triglyceride metabolism

Four microRNAs appear to play critical roles in controlling cholesterol, triglyceride metabolism

Four tiny segments of RNA appear to play critical roles in controlling cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism. In their report receiving advance online publication in Nature Medicine, a Massachusetts General Hospital-based research team describes finding how these microRNAs could reduce the expression of proteins playing key roles in the generation of beneficial HDL cholesterol, the disposal of artery-clogging LDL cholesterol, control of triglyceride levels and other risk factors of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Patrolling monocytes may play anti-cancer role in the lung

Patrolling monocytes may play anti-cancer role in the lung

One goal of immunotherapy is to rally a patient's often over-burdened immune cells to effectively attack a tumor. Among foot soldiers on the immune front line is a subpopulation of white blood cells called "patrolling monocytes," whose job is to cruise the bloodstream, cart off cellular debris, and block invasion of a less benign population of inflammatory cells. [More]
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