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Atopic dermatitis is a long-term skin disease. "Atopic" refers to a tendency to develop allergy conditions. "Dermatitis" means swelling of the skin. Atopic dermatitis is most common in babies and children. But it can happen to anyone. People who live in cities and dry climates may be more likely to get this disease. When children with atopic dermatitis grow older, this problem can improve or go away. But the skin may stay dry and easy to irritate. At other times, atopic dermatitis is a problem in adulthood. You can't "catch" the disease or give it to other people.
New mathematical model suggests how AD may progress to become chronic

New mathematical model suggests how AD may progress to become chronic

Successive flare-ups of the most common form of eczema may trigger an immune system overreaction, causing it to become a long-term condition in people. [More]
Study reveals why air pollutants cause some people to be at risk for atopic dermatitis

Study reveals why air pollutants cause some people to be at risk for atopic dermatitis

Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine and Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization are pleased to announce the published results of a study into why air pollutants cause some people to be more susceptible to atopic dermatitis, a kind of skin inflammation. [More]
Common bacteria on human skin may offer protection against diseases

Common bacteria on human skin may offer protection against diseases

There are more and more examples of the ways in which we can benefit from our bacteria. According to researcher Rolf Lood from Lund University in Sweden, this is true for the skin as well. [More]
Wearable patch shows promise for treating children with peanut allergy

Wearable patch shows promise for treating children with peanut allergy

A wearable patch that delivers small amounts of peanut protein through the skin shows promise for treating children and young adults with peanut allergy, with greater benefits for younger children, according to one-year results from an ongoing clinical trial. [More]
New study finds no evidence of benefit from genetic disposition of eczema

New study finds no evidence of benefit from genetic disposition of eczema

Some genetic diseases persist for generation after generation because the genes that cause them can benefit human health. [More]
Study opens door towards personalized medicine for children with eczema

Study opens door towards personalized medicine for children with eczema

Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is a common skin disorder that usually starts by 5 years of age, but virtually all of the studies that have defined the immune changes underlying eczema and are directing new treatment options have been done in adult skin. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

There is a lot of evidence that Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is involved in eczema. Eczema is now thought to be caused by a barrier dysfunction of the skin that allows external triggers to cause an overshoot of inflammation. [More]
Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Nearly 80 percent of peanut-allergic preschool children successfully incorporated peanut-containing foods into their diets after receiving peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), a clinical trial has found. [More]
Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

When a patient is diagnosed with eczema, the diagnosis of another medical condition may not be far behind. [More]
Study finds link between eczema and S. aureus bacteria

Study finds link between eczema and S. aureus bacteria

A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology has shown that, on average, 70% of eczema patients are colonised with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (S. aureus, including MRSA) on their skin lesions. [More]
Early-life peanut consumption feasible and nutritionally safe for children, study finds

Early-life peanut consumption feasible and nutritionally safe for children, study finds

Introducing peanut-containing foods during infancy as a peanut allergy prevention strategy does not compromise the duration of breastfeeding or affect children's growth and nutritional intakes, new findings show. [More]
Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

A new study suggests that treatment with stem cells from umbilical cord blood might be an effective therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe eczema, or atopic dermatitis. [More]
Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Elimination of the food that triggers atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is associated with increased risk of developing immediate reactions to that food, according to the results of a large-scale study recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King's College London. [More]
Study shows canine AD shares significant features of human version

Study shows canine AD shares significant features of human version

Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin condition and the most common form of eczema, is estimated to afflict as much as 10 percent of the U.S. population, and is much more common now than it was 50 years ago. Veterinary clinical estimates also show that approximately 10 percent of dogs have atopic dermatitis. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Phase 3 study: Sarilumab monotherapy meets primary endpoint in active rheumatoid arthritis patients

Phase 3 study: Sarilumab monotherapy meets primary endpoint in active rheumatoid arthritis patients

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Sanofi today announced that a Phase 3 monotherapy study met its primary endpoint demonstrating that sarilumab was superior to adalimumab (marketed by AbbVie as HUMIRA) in improving signs and symptoms in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at Week 24. [More]
Immune enters into exclusive license with Atlante Biotech for new format of bispecific antibodies

Immune enters into exclusive license with Atlante Biotech for new format of bispecific antibodies

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. a clinical-stage company developing novel therapies for the treatment of immuno-inflammatory diseases and cancer, today announced it has entered into an exclusive license with Atlante Biotech SAS, to the patents and know-how for a new format of bispecific antibodies. [More]
Asthma in childhood may increase risk of shingles

Asthma in childhood may increase risk of shingles

Nearly 1 million incidences of herpes zoster, which is also known as shingles, occur every year in the U.S., with an estimated one-third of all adults affected by age 80. Despite its prevalence, particularly between ages 50 and 59, it is still unclear why some individuals will develop shingles, and others will not. [More]
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