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Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia. An arrhythmia is a problem with the speed or rhythm of the heartbeat. A disorder in the heart’s electrical system causes AF and other types of arrhythmia. AF occurs when rapid, disorganized electrical signals in the heart’s two upper chambers, called the atria, cause them to contract very fast and irregularly (this is called fibrillation). As a result, blood pools in the atria and isn’t pumped completely into the heart’s two lower chambers, called the ventricles. When this happens, the heart’s upper and lower chambers don’t work together as they should. Often, people who have AF may not even feel symptoms. However, even when not noticed, AF can lead to an increased risk of stroke. In many patients, particularly when the rhythm is extremely rapid, AF can cause chest pain, heart attack, or heart failure. AF may occur rarely or every now and then, or it may become a persistent or permanent heart rhythm lasting for years.
Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital introduces ultra-minimally invasive procedure for patients with atrial fibrillation

Boca Raton Regional Hospital's Richard G. Cartledge, MD, FACS, has begun performing ultra-minimally invasive left atrial appendage ligation for atrial fibrillation patients who are on anticoagulants such as Coumadin, Xarelto or Effient. Dr. Cartledge, who is Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Hospital, is one of a select group of surgeons nationally using this method, which involves making two microscopic incisions in order to seal off the left atrial appendage (LAA) in patients where anticoagulants are contraindicated or who refuse to be on such medications. [More]
First-line catheter ablation treatment superior to drug therapy for suppressing AF

First-line catheter ablation treatment superior to drug therapy for suppressing AF

First-line treatment with catheter ablation is superior to drug therapy for reducing atrial fibrillation, according to five year results from the MANTRA-PAF trial presented for the first time at ESC Congress today. [More]
AF patients treated with rivaroxaban for stroke prevention experience low rates of bleeding and stroke

AF patients treated with rivaroxaban for stroke prevention experience low rates of bleeding and stroke

Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients treated with rivaroxaban for stroke prevention have low rates of bleeding and stroke, reveals real-world data from the XANTUS study presented at ESC Congress today. [More]
Defibrillator does not improve outcomes in patients with CRT pacemaker

Defibrillator does not improve outcomes in patients with CRT pacemaker

Most patients with a cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) pacemaker would not benefit from the addition of a defibrillator, according to results from the CeRtiTuDe cohort study presented for the first time today at ESC Congress1 and published in European Heart Journal. [More]
GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

GARFIELD-AF Registry: All-cause death is most frequent major event in newly diagnosed AF patients

The first-ever two-year outcomes from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) showcased at ESC Congress 2015 expose that all-cause death was the most frequent major event in more than 17,000 newly diagnosed AF patients, far exceeding the rate of stroke or major bleeding. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare announce results from landmark studies evaluating safety profile of XARELTO in NVAF patients

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced results from PMSS (Post-Marketing Safety Surveillance) and XANTUS (XARELTO for Prevention of Stroke in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation), their landmark real-world studies evaluating the safety of XARELTO in people with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). [More]

Additional electrical isolation of left atrial appendage could improve freedom from AF

In patients with long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) despite standard treatment, additional electrical isolation of an area called the left atrial appendage (LAA) can improve freedom from AF without increasing complications, results of the BELIEF study show. [More]
Educational program does not influence patients’ adherence to apixaban anticoagulant

Educational program does not influence patients’ adherence to apixaban anticoagulant

Adherence to the oral anticoagulant apixaban among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) was no better for those who received an educational program compared to those who did not, results of the international, randomised AEGEAN trial show. [More]
Stroke prevention strategies in elderly should focus on multiple risk factors

Stroke prevention strategies in elderly should focus on multiple risk factors

The impact of atrial fibrillation on ischaemic stroke risk in elderly patients is eliminated with multiple risk factors, according to an 11 year study in more than 425 000 patients presented at ESC Congress today. [More]
ESC guideline adherent antithrombotic management improves outcomes in AF patients

ESC guideline adherent antithrombotic management improves outcomes in AF patients

Patients with atrial fibrillation who receive antithrombotic management according to ESC guidelines have better outcomes than those who do not, according to one year follow up results from the ESC's EORP-AF Pilot General Registry presented today at ESC Congress 20151 and published online in Europace. [More]
Study finds no significant impact of ATP on reducing late recurrence of AF

Study finds no significant impact of ATP on reducing late recurrence of AF

Late recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is not reduced in patients whose pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) treatment incorporates the addition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), according to results of the UNDER-ATP trial. [More]
Radial approach superior than femoral one for coronary angiography and PCI for ACS patients

Radial approach superior than femoral one for coronary angiography and PCI for ACS patients

For the first time, ESC Guidelines published today give the highest degree of recommendation for the radial approach over the femoral one for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). [More]
ESC Guidelines recommend DNA analysis for post mortem assessment in young sudden death victims

ESC Guidelines recommend DNA analysis for post mortem assessment in young sudden death victims

ESC Guidelines published today recommend DNA analysis as a fundamental component of post mortem assessment in young sudden death victims. Identification of a genetic cause helps to quickly diagnose and protect relatives. [More]
High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

Obese atrial fibrillation patients have a lower chance of arrhythmia recurrence if they have high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk continues to decline as exercise capacity increases as part of treatment, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
First Virtual Support Network launched for women living with atrial fibrillation

First Virtual Support Network launched for women living with atrial fibrillation

WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease today announced the launch of the first Virtual Support Network specifically for women living with atrial fibrillation (afib) – a serious heart condition that carries a high risk of stroke. [More]
GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

GARFIELD-AF data to demonstrate impact of antithrombotic treatment patterns on AF patients at ESC Congress 2015

New analyses from the Global Anticoagulant Registry in the Field - Atrial Fibrillation (GARFIELD-AF) will be presented at ESC Congress 2015 to be held in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 2, 2015. [More]
ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

ESC Congress to highlight results from global trials in six press conferences

Members of the press will be the first to hear the highly anticipated results from global trials in six press conferences devoted to hot lines research. [More]
Delaying surgery until clinical triggers emerge leads to increased mortality in patients with mitral regurgitation

Delaying surgery until clinical triggers emerge leads to increased mortality in patients with mitral regurgitation

Patients with mitral regurgitation face a dilemma of whether to undergo corrective surgery early, when they might have no or few symptoms, or wait until their condition worsens. Current guidelines allow for watchful waiting until certain symptoms appear that would then "trigger" the decision to proceed with surgery. [More]
Instrumentation Laboratory announces European release of HemosIL Rivaroxaban Testing Solution

Instrumentation Laboratory announces European release of HemosIL Rivaroxaban Testing Solution

Instrumentation Laboratory today announced the commercialization of their HemosIL Rivaroxaban Testing Solution in Europe. The HemosIL Liquid Anti-Xa assay, when used in conjunction with HemosIL Rivaroxaban Calibrators and HemosIL Rivaroxaban controls offers an automated solution for measurement of rivaroxaban. [More]
Lund University researchers discovered 'main switch' that regulates cell invaginations

Lund University researchers discovered 'main switch' that regulates cell invaginations

Lack of microinvaginations in the cell membrane, caveolae, can cause serious diseases such as lipodystrophy and muscular dystrophy. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered a "main switch" that regulates the formation of these invaginations. [More]
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