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U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]

SWHR co-sponsors National Institutes of Health Forum on microbiome and autoimmunity

The Society for Women's Health Research (SWHR®), the leading voice on the study of the biological differences between women and men, is co-sponsoring the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Forum on the Microbiome and Autoimmunity on Thursday, April 24, at the NIH in Bethesda, Md. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

Researchers uncover mechanism that may help explain severe forms of schistosomiasis

​Researchers at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts and Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) have uncovered a mechanism that may help explain the severe forms of schistosomiasis, or snail fever, which is caused by schistosome worms and is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases in the world. The study in mice, published online in The Journal of Immunology, may also offer targets for intervention and amelioration of the disease. [More]

Kineta, RLB Holdings form joint venture to address unmet medical needs

Kineta, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on the development of immune-modulating drugs for critical diseases, and RLB Holdings, an investment fund founded by Ray and Lydia Bartoszek, have formed a joint venture, Kineta RLB, LLC, which will commercialize promising, high-value compounds in selective disease areas with unmet medical needs. [More]
Too much of c-FLIPR protein can trigger autoimmune diseases

Too much of c-FLIPR protein can trigger autoimmune diseases

So-called c-FLIP proteins inhibit signaling cascades that can lead to apoptosis. This is important temporarily in the response to pathogens to ensure that lymphocytes, a type of immune cells, can proliferate sufficiently. [More]
Loyola researchers study role of yoga in reducing symptoms of urinary incontinence in women

Loyola researchers study role of yoga in reducing symptoms of urinary incontinence in women

Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON) researchers are recruiting women for a study to determine whether practicing yoga will help reduce symptoms of urinary incontinence. [More]

New insights provide novel therapeutic approach against cancer

A major discovery that brings a new drug target to the increasingly exciting landscape of cancer immunotherapy was published yesterday by researchers from La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and their collaborators from other institutes. [More]

Magnetically controlled nanoparticles force tumour cells to 'self-destruct', shows research

Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumour cells to 'self-destruct' sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. [More]

Patients with autoimmune disease have 3.8-fold increased risk of developing epilepsy

Patients with an autoimmune disease have a 3.8-fold increased risk of developing epilepsy, according to a new population-level study from Boston Children's Hospital based on health insurance claim data. [More]
Idera Pharmaceuticals reports positive top-line results from Phase 2 trial of IMO-8400

Idera Pharmaceuticals reports positive top-line results from Phase 2 trial of IMO-8400

Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced positive top-line data from its randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled Phase 2 trial of IMO-8400 in 32 patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. [More]

RuiYi declares $15M Series B financing to advance monoclonal antibodies targeting GPCR receptors

RuiYi, Inc. announced today a $15 million Series B financing by existing investors: 5AM Ventures, Versant Ventures, Apposite Capital, SR One, the independent corporate healthcare venture capital fund of GlaxoSmithKline, Merck Serono Ventures, the strategic corporate venture fund of Merck Serono, and Aravis SA. [More]
Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is marked by a cascade of cellular and inflammatory events that weakens and kills vital motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The process is complex, involving cells that ordinarily protect the neurons from harm. Now, a new study by scientists in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital points to a potential culprit in this good-cell-gone-bad scenario, a key step toward the ultimate goal of developing a treatment. [More]
Loyola study finds fewer children at risk of inadequate or deficient vitamin D levels

Loyola study finds fewer children at risk of inadequate or deficient vitamin D levels

Under new guidelines from the Institute of Medicine, the estimated number of children who are at risk for having insufficient or deficient levels of vitamin D is drastically reduced from previous estimates, according to a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine study. [More]
Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

Researchers discover novel population of neutrophils that exhibit enhanced microbial killing activity

​Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered a novel population of neutrophils, which are the body's infection control workhorses. These cells have an enhanced microbial killing ability and are thereby better able to control infection. [More]
Concise analysis of China’s rituximab drug market

Concise analysis of China’s rituximab drug market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Investigation Report on China Rituximab Market, 2009-2018" report to their offering. [More]
New weapon against secondary progressive MS

New weapon against secondary progressive MS

Statins may provide doctors with an unlikely new weapon with which to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]

Simvastatin may slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Results of a phase 2 study published in The Lancet suggest that simvastatin, a cheap cholesterol lowering drug, might be a potential treatment option for the secondary progressive, or chronic, stage of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is currently untreatable. [More]
Computer analysis of various subtypes of asthma could eventually lead to improved therapy, says study

Computer analysis of various subtypes of asthma could eventually lead to improved therapy, says study

So m​any variables can contribute to shortness of breath that no person can keep them all straight. But a computer program, capable of tracking more than 100 clinical variables for almost 400 people, has shown it can identify various subtypes of asthma, which perhaps could lead to targeted, more effective treatments. [More]
Study finds that patients who lose weight have better joint replacement outcomes

Study finds that patients who lose weight have better joint replacement outcomes

While many overweight patients have the best intentions to lose weight after joint replacement, a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) finds that although some are able to achieve this goal, equal numbers of patients actually gain weight after hip or knee replacement. [More]
Study finds that same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery safe for select patients with RA

Study finds that same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery safe for select patients with RA

Same-day bilateral knee replacement surgery is safe for select patients with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery in New York have found. [More]