Autoimmune Diseases News and Research RSS Feed - Autoimmune Diseases News and Research

Early viral respiratory infections may increase type 1 diabetes risk in children

Early viral respiratory infections may increase type 1 diabetes risk in children

Viral respiratory infections during the first six months of life are associated with an increased risk for type 1 diabetes. This is the conclusion reached by a team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München during a study published in the current issue of the renowned US magazine 'JAMA'. [More]
Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

Biomedical researcher wins 2016 Gutenberg Research Award for work on programmed cell death

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has chosen to give the 2016 Gutenberg Research Award to American biomedical researcher Dr. Vishva Dixit for his groundbreaking work in the field of programmed cell death. [More]
Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Exposure to pathogens early in life is beneficial to the education and development of the human immune system. [More]
TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

As its name suggests, inflammatory bowel disease, which afflicts more than 1.6 million Americans, involves chronic inflammation of all or some of the digestive tract. An autoimmune disease known to have a strong genetic component, its symptoms are abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and fever and, sometimes, weight loss. IBD, which is a group of inflammatory conditions, includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Scientists want to know whether taking antibiotics early in life can disrupt your immune system function lifelong. [More]
Daily dose of coffee could help reverse non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Daily dose of coffee could help reverse non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Adding coffee to the diet of people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) could help reverse the condition, according to a new study conducted in mice presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
Alternative splicing regulates MALT1 protein to have stronger or weaker effect on immune system

Alternative splicing regulates MALT1 protein to have stronger or weaker effect on immune system

The protein MALT1 is an important switch in immune cells and affects their activity. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München report in 'Nature Communications' that this activation is not always equally strong. Through alternative splicing, two variants of the protein may arise which have a stronger or weaker effect on the immune system. Understanding this process is important for the pharmacological use of MALT1. [More]
New plant-derived oral drug can prevent progression of multiple sclerosis

New plant-derived oral drug can prevent progression of multiple sclerosis

An international research team has demonstrated that a new plant-derived drug can block the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Immune cell with 'Superman' power could lead to novel therapies for type 1 diabetes

Immune cell with 'Superman' power could lead to novel therapies for type 1 diabetes

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveals a previously unknown type of immune cell. The discovery opens new avenues in the effort to develop novel therapies for autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. [More]
Increased consumption of antibiotics in childhood may lead to adolescent prediabetes

Increased consumption of antibiotics in childhood may lead to adolescent prediabetes

Young children who take antibiotics may disrupt their gut's microbial ecosystem and be more likely to develop prediabetes in adolescence, new research from Greece reports. The study results will be presented in a poster Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
Study points to possible new genetic risk factor for celiac disease

Study points to possible new genetic risk factor for celiac disease

Researchers have identified a common variant in a non-coding RNA that may contribute to the intestinal inflammation that occurs in people with celiac disease. The findings point to a possible new risk factor for developing celiac disease in people with celiac disease risk genes. [More]
Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth. [More]
Researchers use DNA sequencing technology to identify gene variants that affect susceptibility to SLE

Researchers use DNA sequencing technology to identify gene variants that affect susceptibility to SLE

Demonstrating the potential of precision medicine, an international study based at UT Southwestern Medical Center used next-generation DNA sequencing technology to identify more than 1,000 gene variants that affect susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). [More]
Bonn scientists identify immune factor partially responsible for chronic viral infection

Bonn scientists identify immune factor partially responsible for chronic viral infection

Many viral diseases tend to become chronic - including infections with the HI virus. In persons affected, the immune response is not sufficient to eliminate the virus permanently. [More]
Xencor begins XmAb5871 Phase 2 trials in patients with IgG4-RD and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Xencor begins XmAb5871 Phase 2 trials in patients with IgG4-RD and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Xencor, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing engineered monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, asthma and allergic diseases and cancer, today announced dosing the first patient in a Phase 2 trial of XmAb5871 in patients with IgG4-Related Disease (IgG4-RD). [More]
Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis: an interview with Dr Kristin Highland

Systemic sclerosis, also known as scleroderma, is a rare disease characterized by the thickening and scarring of connective tissue of multiple organs in the body [More]
Modified protein appears to reverse liver fibrosis, cirrhosis in rats

Modified protein appears to reverse liver fibrosis, cirrhosis in rats

A protein modified to increase the amount of time it circulates in the bloodstream appears to reverse liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in rats, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. [More]
Research: Impaired immune response significantly involved in rare autoimmune diseases

Research: Impaired immune response significantly involved in rare autoimmune diseases

In the context of the multicentre EU project "INTRICATE" under the management of Renate Kain of the Clinical Institute for Pathology of MedUni Vienna, the effects of infections on the generation of rare autoimmune diseases such as granulomatous polyangiitis (GPA), a systemic disease of the vascular system, are examined. [More]
Sangamo presents immunological data from SB-728-T HIV clinical study at CROI 2016

Sangamo presents immunological data from SB-728-T HIV clinical study at CROI 2016

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced the presentation of immunological data from the Company's clinical trials of SB-728-T, a ZFP Therapeutic designed to provide functional control of HIV. [More]
Influenza virus can able to circumvent the body's immune system

Influenza virus can able to circumvent the body's immune system

Influenza is able to mask itself, so that the virus is not initially detected by our immune system. This is the result of new research from Aarhus University. The researchers behind the study hope that the discovery can be used to develop better treatment against influenza and chronic inflammation conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement