Azithromycin News and Research RSS Feed - Azithromycin News and Research

Azithromycin, also known as Zithromax, belongs to the class of medicines known as antibacterials orantibiotics. These medicines kill bacteria (small organisms that can cause infection in humans) or stopbacteria from growing. Patients with weakened immune systems, includingpeople with HIV, tend to have more frequent andmore serious bacterial infections. Azithromycinwas approved by the FDA on June 14, 1996, formany uses, including the prevention and treatmentof Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) inpersons with advanced HIV infection. It is alsobeing investigated to see how well it works inpreventing other kinds of bacterial infections inpeople with HIV.
Current recommendations advise prompt antiviral treatment for high-risk patients with influenza

Current recommendations advise prompt antiviral treatment for high-risk patients with influenza

Patients likely to benefit the most from antiviral therapy for influenza were prescribed these drugs infrequently during the 2012-2013 influenza season, while antibiotics may have been overprescribed. [More]
Pneumonia patients treated with azithromycin face lower risk of death, slightly increased risk of heart attack

Pneumonia patients treated with azithromycin face lower risk of death, slightly increased risk of heart attack

In a study that included nearly 65,000 older patients hospitalized with pneumonia, treatment that included azithromycin compared with other antibiotics was associated with a significantly lower risk of death and a slightly increased risk of heart attack, according to a study in the June 4 issue of JAMA. [More]
Review on effects of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs

Review on effects of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs

Researchers from the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, co-ordinated through the editorial base in LSTM, conducted an independent review of the effects of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs, published in The Cochrane Library today. [More]

InSite and Senju collaborate to develop and market azithromycin ophthalmic solution using DuraSite

InSite Vision Incorporated and Senju Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. today announced that they have entered into a collaboration and license agreement to develop and market InSite's azithromycin ophthalmic solution using DuraSite® including AzaSite® 1% and AzaSite XtraTM 2% ocular antibiotics in Japan. Senju has agreed to pay InSite an upfront license fee, additional development milestones fees, and a percentage royalty on net sales. [More]
TPI announces financial results for second quarter fiscal year 2014

TPI announces financial results for second quarter fiscal year 2014

Tianyin Pharmaceutical Inc., a pharmaceutical company that specializes in the patented biopharmaceutical, modernized traditional Chinese medicine (mTCM), branded generics and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) announced financial results for the second quarter fiscal year 2014. [More]
Researchers identify potential therapy for meibomian gland dysfunction

Researchers identify potential therapy for meibomian gland dysfunction

Meibomian gland dysfunction is the leading cause of dry eye disease, which affects tens of millions of Americans. However, there is no FDA-approved treatment for MGD. Researchers from the Schepens Eye Research Institute/Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School have just identified a potential therapy. [More]
TPI’s revenue decreases 8.1% to $14.8 million in first quarter fiscal year 2014

TPI’s revenue decreases 8.1% to $14.8 million in first quarter fiscal year 2014

Tianyin Pharmaceutical Inc. (NYSE Amex: TPI), a pharmaceutical company that specializes in the patented biopharmaceutical, modernized traditional Chinese medicine (mTCM), branded generics and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) announced financial results for the first quarter fiscal year 2014. [More]
Calcium-channel blocker and antibiotic intake linked with small but greater risk of kidney injury

Calcium-channel blocker and antibiotic intake linked with small but greater risk of kidney injury

Among older adults taking a calcium-channel blocker, simultaneous use of the antibiotic clarithromycin, compared with azithromycin, was associated with a small but statistically significant greater 30-day risk of hospitalization with acute kidney injury, according to a study published by JAMA. The study is being published early online to coincide with its presentation at the American Society of Nephrology's Kidney Week 2013. [More]
Viewpoints: Sen. Sanders says don't cut entitlements before making corporations pay taxes; Rep. Smith argues that if entitlements are tamed, other priorities will suffer

Viewpoints: Sen. Sanders says don't cut entitlements before making corporations pay taxes; Rep. Smith argues that if entitlements are tamed, other priorities will suffer

Instead of talking about cuts in Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, we must end the absurdity of corporations not paying a nickel in federal income taxes. A 2008 report from the Government Accountability Office found that was the case with 1 in 4 large U.S. corporations. At a time when multinational corporations and the wealthy are avoiding an estimated $100 billion a year in taxes by stashing money in tax havens like the Cayman Islands, we need to make them pay taxes just as middle-class Americans do (Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., 10/28). [More]
Research roundup: Health law's effects on consumer spending; Mass. experience finds increased use of laparoscopic surgery

Research roundup: Health law's effects on consumer spending; Mass. experience finds increased use of laparoscopic surgery

The authors find that average out-of-pocket spending is expected to decrease for all groups considered in the analysis, although decreases in out-of-pocket spending will be largest for those who would otherwise be uninsured. [More]

BESTCILIA project aims to improve screening, treatment of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia is mainly a lung disease: a rare, genetically heterogeneous disorder resulting from dysfunction of small hair-like organelles (cilia) that clean the upper and lower airways. It can also affect multiple organs beside the respiratory system, and may cause serious impairment and lower quality of life. Its prevalence is estimated to be about 1 in 16,000. [More]
Diabetic patients taking oral fluoroquinolones may have high risk of severe blood sugar-related problems

Diabetic patients taking oral fluoroquinolones may have high risk of severe blood sugar-related problems

Diabetic patients taking oral fluoroquinolones, a frequently prescribed class of antibiotics, were found to have a higher risk of severe blood sugar-related problems than diabetic patients taking other kinds of antibiotics, according to a recent study from Taiwan published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Study: Extended azithromycin therapy may offer significant benefits to COPD patients

Study: Extended azithromycin therapy may offer significant benefits to COPD patients

Extended use of a common antibiotic may prolong the time between hospitalizations for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to a post-hoc analysis of a multicenter study which compared the hospitalization rates of patients treated with a 12-month course of azithromycin to the rates of those treated with placebo. [More]
InSite Vision starts patient enrollment in confirmatory Phase 3 clinical trial of BromSite

InSite Vision starts patient enrollment in confirmatory Phase 3 clinical trial of BromSite

InSite Vision Incorporated today announced that patient enrollment has begun in the confirmatory Phase 3 clinical trial of BromSite (ISV-303) for the reduction of inflammation and pain after cataract surgery. [More]
Cempra demonstrates solithromycin's potential against urogenital infections at ECCMID

Cempra demonstrates solithromycin's potential against urogenital infections at ECCMID

Cempra, Inc., a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on developing differentiated antibiotics to meet critical medical needs in the treatment of bacterial infections, today announced that it will present data at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases in Berlin, demonstrating solithromycin's potential to treat urogenital infections and combat challenging pathogens such as enterococci and Legionella pneumophila. [More]

Study shows benefit of azithromycin in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis

Among patients with the lung disorder non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, treatment with the antibiotic azithromycin resulted in improvement in symptoms but also increased the risk of antibiotic resistance, according to a study appearing in the March 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Erythromycin may provide benefit for patients with non-CF bronchiectasis

Erythromycin may provide benefit for patients with non-CF bronchiectasis

Among patients with the lung disorder non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, treatment with the antibiotic erythromycin resulted in improvement in symptoms but also increased the risk of antibiotic resistance, according to a study appearing in the March 27 issue of JAMA. [More]

Tianyin Pharmaceutical second quarter revenue decreases 3.3% to $17.6 million

Tianyin Pharmaceutical Inc., a pharmaceutical company that specializes in the patented biopharmaceutical, modernized traditional Chinese medicine (mTCM), branded generics and active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) announced financial results for second quarter of the fiscal year 2013. [More]
Disease eradication efforts set sights on polio, Guinea worm

Disease eradication efforts set sights on polio, Guinea worm

"It's not a race, exactly, but there's an intriguing uncertainty about whether a former U.S. president or a software magnate will cause the next deliberate extinction of a species in the wild. Will Jimmy Carter eradicate Guinea worm before Bill Gates eradicates polio?" Wall Street Journal commentator Matt Ridley asks in his "Mind & Matter" column. [More]
UCSF teams to study new ways to reduce childhood mortality and disease in developing nations

UCSF teams to study new ways to reduce childhood mortality and disease in developing nations

Two UCSF teams have received a total of $16 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study new ways to significantly reduce childhood mortality and disease in developing nations. [More]