Back Pain News and Research RSS Feed - Back Pain News and Research

Back pain is a very common problem affecting almost all individuals at some point in their lives. Back pain most commonly affects the lower back although it can be felt anywhere along the spine. An individual may experience aching, tension and stiffness that lasts for only a few days or weeks, or these symptoms may continue for many months or even years.

In most cases, back pain does not have a specific or serious cause and is often referred to as 'non-specific' pain. However, the pain can be triggered or worsened by, for example, a poor sitting or standing posture or bending or lifting incorrectly.

The use of painkillers and keeping active is often sufficient for the condition to resolve within 12 weeks. If back pain lasts longer than this, in which case it is termed chronic pain, an individual should visit their doctor. If the back pain is accompanied by any one of a fever, unexplained weight loss, swelling in the back, chest pain, leg pain, loss of bladder or bowel control, inability to pass urine, or pain that is worse at night, then medical help should be sought immediately. These are termed 'red flag symptoms' and could be a sign of something more serious such as rheumatoid arthritis, a slipped disc or osteoporosis.

People can reduce their chance of developing back pain by engaging in regular exercise, particularly swimming or walking, taking care to bend from the knees and hips rather than the back and maintaining a good posture.
Study finds link between chronic inflammation and premenstrual symptoms

Study finds link between chronic inflammation and premenstrual symptoms

Women with premenstrual symptoms (PMS) including mood swings, weight gain/bloating, and abdominal cramps/back pain have elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Women live longer than men. This simple statement holds a tantalizing riddle that Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham explore in a perspective piece published in Cell Metabolism on June 14. [More]
Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

Facebook advertising could be more effective way of identifying IBP patients

The results of a UK study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that busing Facebook to raise awareness about the symptoms of Inflammatory Back Pain (IBP) and the need to seek medical help early may reduce the delay in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Coagadex now available for rare bleeding disorder patients in the UK

Coagadex now available for rare bleeding disorder patients in the UK

Bio Products Laboratory, Limited (BPL) today announced that Coagadex is now available for patients in the UK. [More]
Risk group system may help better predict long-term consequences from whiplash trauma

Risk group system may help better predict long-term consequences from whiplash trauma

Possible long-term consequences from a whiplash trauma can be effectively predicted if the injured persons are subdivided into different risk groups shortly after the car accident. This is shown by a Danish study that was presented at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen. [More]
First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

First buprenorphine implant for opioid dependence treatment gets FDA approval

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Probuphine, the first buprenorphine implant for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Probuphine is designed to provide a constant, low-level dose of buprenorphine for six months in patients who are already stable on low-to-moderate doses of other forms of buprenorphine, as part of a complete treatment program. [More]
Better self-care and patient education can improve treatment for chronic pain

Better self-care and patient education can improve treatment for chronic pain

The National Pain Strategy, released this year by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, places strong emphasis on self management and patient education as critical pathways for improving treatment of chronic pain, especially the leading malady, back pain. [More]
Strength training lowers odds of death in older adults

Strength training lowers odds of death in older adults

Older adults who met twice-weekly strength training guidelines had lower odds of dying in a new analysis by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Columbia University. The study is the first to demonstrate the association in a large, nationally representative sample over an extended time period, particularly in an older population. [More]
Professor outlines effects of sports-specific counseling on injury outcomes in youth athletes

Professor outlines effects of sports-specific counseling on injury outcomes in youth athletes

Neeru Jayanthi, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine at Emory University Sports Medicine Center in Atlanta, GA, presented "The Effects of Serial Sports Training Risk Assessment and Counseling in Kids (T.R.A.C.K.)" at the 25th Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine in Dallas, TX. [More]
Study to test effectiveness of worksite exercise regimen to reduce low back injury risk in firefighters

Study to test effectiveness of worksite exercise regimen to reduce low back injury risk in firefighters

The University of South Florida and Tampa Fire Rescue have launched a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a worksite exercise regimen targeted to reduce the risk of low back injury and disability in firefighters -- a physically demanding occupation particularly prone to back problems that can lead to chronic pain and early retirement. [More]
European Medicines Agency approves first-ever treatment for hereditary factor X deficiency

European Medicines Agency approves first-ever treatment for hereditary factor X deficiency

Bio Products Laboratory, Limited (BPL) today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted marketing authorisation for Coagadex. [More]
Restrictions to opioid prescription block their use for safe, effective pain relief

Restrictions to opioid prescription block their use for safe, effective pain relief

Opioids are very effective for treating some types of pain, such as cancer pain and postoperative pain, but not for other kinds of pain like chronic low back pain. An increase in the number of opioid-related deaths among addicts has led to the current movement to restrict opioid prescribing by state and federal authorities. [More]
New reference guide can help HIV care providers treat chronic pain

New reference guide can help HIV care providers treat chronic pain

Recent studies suggest many individuals with HIV have chronic pain. Estimates range from 39 percent all the way to 85 percent. Chronic pain is an important comorbid condition in individuals with HIV, as it is common and causes substantial disability. [More]
Sitting for all or much of the day could affect a person’s overall health

Sitting for all or much of the day could affect a person’s overall health

Despite their popularity, the effectiveness of stand-up desks and other strategies aimed at getting people to sit less at work is largely uncertain, according to a systematic review of published research conducted by Cochrane Collaboration authors [More]
IUPUI researchers examine pain experience, pain management among Hispanic Americans

IUPUI researchers examine pain experience, pain management among Hispanic Americans

Hispanic Americans report fewer pain conditions compared with non-Hispanic white or black Americans, according to a critical review and analysis of more than 100 studies on pain experience and pain management among Hispanic Americans. [More]
New study shows that structural changes within the spine alter vibration response

New study shows that structural changes within the spine alter vibration response

Magnetic resonance image isn't everything. A new University of Alberta study shows that vibrating the spine may reveal more when it comes to treating back pain. Teaming with the University of South Denmark to study the lumbar spine of twins, Greg Kawchuk and his team demonstrate that structural changes within the spine alter its vibration response significantly. [More]
Neck pain more common in women than in men, Loyola study finds

Neck pain more common in women than in men, Loyola study finds

Women are 1.38 times more likely than men to report neck pain due to cervical degenerative disc disease, according to a study of adult patients treated at Loyola Medicine's Pain Management Center. [More]
Report: One in two Americans affected by musculoskeletal condition

Report: One in two Americans affected by musculoskeletal condition

An estimated 126.6 million Americans (one in two adults) are affected by a musculoskeletal condition--comparable to the total percentage of Americans living with a chronic lung or heart condition--costing an estimated $213 billion in annual treatment, care and lost wages, according to a new report issued today by the United States Bone and Joint Initiative. [More]
Osteopathic manipulative treatment improves function in patients suffering from chronic low back pain

Osteopathic manipulative treatment improves function in patients suffering from chronic low back pain

Studies published in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association found that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) reduced pain and improved function in patients suffering from chronic, nonspecific low back pain. [More]
New review suggests solutions that can help ease chronic pain in women

New review suggests solutions that can help ease chronic pain in women

Women often suffer silently when in pain, whether it's caused by pregnancy discomfort or creaky knees. Yet there are a variety of solutions that can help relieve women of chronic pain, from exercise to identifying triggers, suggests a new review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
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