Back Pain News and Research RSS Feed - Back Pain News and Research

Back pain is a very common problem affecting almost all individuals at some point in their lives. Back pain most commonly affects the lower back although it can be felt anywhere along the spine. An individual may experience aching, tension and stiffness that lasts for only a few days or weeks, or these symptoms may continue for many months or even years.

In most cases, back pain does not have a specific or serious cause and is often referred to as 'non-specific' pain. However, the pain can be triggered or worsened by, for example, a poor sitting or standing posture or bending or lifting incorrectly.

The use of painkillers and keeping active is often sufficient for the condition to resolve within 12 weeks. If back pain lasts longer than this, in which case it is termed chronic pain, an individual should visit their doctor. If the back pain is accompanied by any one of a fever, unexplained weight loss, swelling in the back, chest pain, leg pain, loss of bladder or bowel control, inability to pass urine, or pain that is worse at night, then medical help should be sought immediately. These are termed 'red flag symptoms' and could be a sign of something more serious such as rheumatoid arthritis, a slipped disc or osteoporosis.

People can reduce their chance of developing back pain by engaging in regular exercise, particularly swimming or walking, taking care to bend from the knees and hips rather than the back and maintaining a good posture.
Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen, Bayer announce expansion of EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO

Janssen Research & Development, LLC and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, announced today the expansion of the EXPLORER global cardiovascular research program for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) to include additional high-risk patient populations. [More]
Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Study: Young athletes need to avoid continuous repetitive activity to decrease risk of pars fracture

Young athletes today often participate in sports year round and with increasingly competitive club and school sports, it has become common to choose one sport to specialize at a young age. While this specialization may seem like a competitive edge, new Northwestern Medicine research suggests that repetitive activity in just one sport, high impact or not, may not be a great idea for growing athletes. [More]
Doctor offers four important benefits of laser back surgery

Doctor offers four important benefits of laser back surgery

The spinal column is one of the most delicate and essential areas of the human body. Signals carried to and from the brain through the column control many key functions of our motor skills and nervous system. [More]
CEOLIVE.TV interviews BioElectronics expert as part of its Executive Interview Series

CEOLIVE.TV interviews BioElectronics expert as part of its Executive Interview Series

BioElectronics Corporation, the maker of advanced consumer medical devices said that its EVP Dr. Deepak Kotak was interviewed by CEOLIVE.TV as part of its Executive Interview Series. [More]
Physical activity fails to show link with chronic musculoskeletal pain

Physical activity fails to show link with chronic musculoskeletal pain

Neither little nor excessive physical activity contributes to chronic musculoskeletal pain in people who are middle-aged or older, Japanese study findings suggest. [More]
Study reports rising prevalence of chronic opioid use by SSDI recipients

Study reports rising prevalence of chronic opioid use by SSDI recipients

More than 40 percent of Social Security Disability Insurance recipients take opioid pain relievers, while the prevalence of chronic opioid use is over 20 percent and rising, reports a study in the September issue of Medical Care. [More]
PSAL students to receive free comprehensive health screening at HSS

PSAL students to receive free comprehensive health screening at HSS

It's a parent's worst nightmare, and it happens out of the blue. While playing a sport, often football, a teen athlete collapses on the field and doesn't make it. [More]
Disabling back pain increases mortality risk for older women

Disabling back pain increases mortality risk for older women

Disabling back pain puts women in their 70s at an increased risk of death, findings from the Cambridge City over-75s Cohort study suggest. [More]
Research reveals that seizures linked to feelings of anxiety

Research reveals that seizures linked to feelings of anxiety

New research by clinical psychologists from the UK and US has revealed psychogenic seizures which could be mistaken for epilepsy are linked to feelings of anxiety. [More]
GSK announces availability of once-weekly Tanzeum in pharmacies throughout the U.S.

GSK announces availability of once-weekly Tanzeum in pharmacies throughout the U.S.

GSK today announced that once-weekly Tanzeum (albiglutide), a prescription injectable treatment for type 2 diabetes in adults, as an adjunct to diet and exercise, is now available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. [More]
Longer looks: the economics of infertility; placebos as treatment raises ethical dilemmas

Longer looks: the economics of infertility; placebos as treatment raises ethical dilemmas

About a decade ago, Medicaid programs were struggling to keep up with skyrocketing prescription drug costs. Between 1997 and 2002, drug spending in the program for low-income Americans grew by about 20 percent annually. ... Medicaid directors began looking for ways to tamp down on those costs. One of the most popular policies was something called "prior authorization" for a new wave of more expensive, anti-psychotic drugs ,... These policies, in a sense, worked: they helped rein in how much Medicaid spent filling prescriptions. But in another sense, they may not have worked at all: a growing body of research has begun questioning whether restricting drug spending may have just shifted costs elsewhere -; particularly, into the prison system (Sarah Kliff, 7/22). [More]
Paracetamol fails to beat placebo at relieving back pain

Paracetamol fails to beat placebo at relieving back pain

Paracetamol is no more effective than placebo at relieving acute lower back pain, according to new clinical trial results. [More]
FDA approves Targiniq ER to treat severe pain

FDA approves Targiniq ER to treat severe pain

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended-release tablets), an extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioid analgesic to treat pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. [More]
Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Surgeon explains who needs screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms

Bulges in body's major blood vessel can cause potentially lethal ruptures, blood clots. An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition: If the body's major blood vessel ruptures, it can prove deadly. [More]
Once-a-day pill for patients experiencing opioid-induced constipation

Once-a-day pill for patients experiencing opioid-induced constipation

Opioids - strong morphine-based painkillers - are widely prescribed to patients experiencing chronic severe pain. While these drugs are very effective for treating and managing pain, they have one particularly bothersome side effect: constipation. [More]
More insurers want you to see a doctor virtually

More insurers want you to see a doctor virtually

Insurers like WellPoint and Aetna are offering patients the option of e-visits with doctors as a way to cut costs, but some see problems with that, reports Bloomberg. Other media outlets explore the controversy over Sovaldi, an expensive new drug for hepatitis C. [More]
Lower back pain not triggered by weather changes according to new study

Lower back pain not triggered by weather changes according to new study

Episodes of lower back pain are not triggered by changes in weather conditions, say Australian researchers. [More]
Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Acute episodes of low back pain not linked to weather conditions

Australian researchers reveal that sudden, acute episodes of low back pain are not linked to weather conditions such as temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction and precipitation. [More]
Complications from partial knee replacement is very small than total knee replacement

Complications from partial knee replacement is very small than total knee replacement

Partial knee replacement surgery is safer than total knee replacement, according to a new study published in The Lancet today (July 8). [More]
First report of spinal cord mass arising from spinal cord cell transplantation

First report of spinal cord mass arising from spinal cord cell transplantation

A spinal mass was identified in a young woman with complete spinal cord injury 8 years after she had undergone implantation of olfactory mucosal cells in the hopes of regaining sensory and motor function. [More]