Baclofen News and Research RSS Feed - Baclofen News and Research

Baclofen is a synthetic chlorophenyl-butanoic acid derivative used to treat spasms due to spinal cord damage and multiple sclerosis, muscle-relaxing Baclofen acts as a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist specific for GABA-B receptors. It acts at spinal and supraspinal sites, reducing excitatory transmission.
Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Many patients suffer from severe spinal cord injuries after being involved in traffic accidents or accidents at work. [More]
Alcoholic liver disease: an interview with Dr Vinood Patel, University of Westminster

Alcoholic liver disease: an interview with Dr Vinood Patel, University of Westminster

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and also in the UK. As its name indicates this disease arises due to consuming excessive amounts of alcohol (80 g/day) over an extended period, normally 10-20 years. [More]
Form of baclofen works better at treating narcolepsy

Form of baclofen works better at treating narcolepsy

Neuroscientists at SRI International have found that a form of baclofen, a drug used to treat muscle spasticity, works better at treating narcolepsy than the best drug currently available when tested in mice. [More]
Study finds that baclofen drug has potential to prevent cocaine relapse

Study finds that baclofen drug has potential to prevent cocaine relapse

Relapse is the most painful and expensive feature of drug addiction-even after addicted individuals have been drug-free for months or years, the likelihood of sliding back into the habit remains high. The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that 40 to 60 percent of addicted individuals will relapse, and in some studies the rates are as high as 80 percent at six months after treatment. [More]
Erosive GERD treatments: an interview with Professor Joaquim Moraes-Filho, University of São Paulo Medical School

Erosive GERD treatments: an interview with Professor Joaquim Moraes-Filho, University of São Paulo Medical School

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a condition that develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. [More]
JACS reports study on LINX Reflux Management System for GERD treatment

JACS reports study on LINX Reflux Management System for GERD treatment

An estimated 1 in 5 U.S. adults suffer from Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD), a chronic, often progressive disease that can cause debilitating symptoms and in certain cases lead to esophageal cancer. [More]
Child Neurology Society honors LSUHSC professor with 2012 Hower Award

Child Neurology Society honors LSUHSC professor with 2012 Hower Award

The Child Neurology Society presented Ann Henderson Tilton, MD, Clinical Professor of Neurology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, with the 2012 Hower Award at the 41st Annual CNS Meeting in November. [More]
FDA approves Codman’s MEDSTREAM Programmable Infusion System

FDA approves Codman’s MEDSTREAM Programmable Infusion System

Codman & Shurtleff, Inc. (Codman), the global neurological device company, has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval through a PMA supplement for its MEDSTREAM Programmable Infusion System, an implantable infusion pump and catheter system used in the treatment of spasticity, a movement disorder often caused by stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury. [More]
Lesogaberan development halts following disappointing results

Lesogaberan development halts following disappointing results

Lesogaberan is only marginally superior to placebo in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients who are partially responsive to proton pump inhibitor therapy, results show. [More]
Powerful new technique can manipulate the building-block molecules of organic chemistry

Powerful new technique can manipulate the building-block molecules of organic chemistry

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a powerful new technique for manipulating the building-block molecules of organic chemistry. The technique enables chemists to add new functional molecules to previously hard-to-reach positions on existing compounds-making it easier for them to generate new drugs and other organic chemicals. [More]
14-3-3 zeta protein involved in generating chronic pain

14-3-3 zeta protein involved in generating chronic pain

Researchers in France and Sweden have discovered how one of the body's own proteins is involved in generating chronic pain in rats. The results, which also suggest therapeutic interventions to alleviate long-lasting pain, are reported in The EMBO Journal. [More]
XenoPort first quarter revenues increase to $10.4 million

XenoPort first quarter revenues increase to $10.4 million

XenoPort, Inc. announced today its financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2012. Revenues for the quarter were $10.4 million, compared to $0.4 million for the same period in 2011. [More]
New editorial offers clarity on confusing drug and alcohol addiction terminology

New editorial offers clarity on confusing drug and alcohol addiction terminology

A new editorial released this week offers clarity and structure on confusing drug and alcohol addiction terminology for prescribers, users and regulators. "Through a glass darkly: can we improve clarity about mechanism and aims of medications in drug and alcohol treatments?" is published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, the official journal of the British Association for Psychopharmacology, published by SAGE. [More]
UofL, Frazier Rehab to establish Spinal Cord Injury Model System

UofL, Frazier Rehab to establish Spinal Cord Injury Model System

The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) of the U.S. Department of Education has awarded researchers at Frazier Rehab Institute and the University of Louisville $2.2 million for five years to establish a Spinal Cord Injury Model System. [More]
Children and adults with social withdrawal due to Fragile X may benefit from STX209

Children and adults with social withdrawal due to Fragile X may benefit from STX209

Children and adults with social withdrawal due to Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and the most common known single gene cause of autism, may benefit from an experimental drug under study by pediatric neurologists at Rush Children's Hospital at Rush University Medical Center. [More]
XenoPort files SPA with FDA for arbaclofen placarbil Phase 3 trial in multiple sclerosis

XenoPort files SPA with FDA for arbaclofen placarbil Phase 3 trial in multiple sclerosis

XenoPort, Inc. announced today that it had reached agreement with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on a Special Protocol Assessment for a pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial of arbaclofen placarbil, previously known as XP19986, as a potential treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis patients. [More]
New Pediatric Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

New Pediatric Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital has established a Pediatric Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service, led by Dr. Heakyung Kim. In this role, Dr. Kim will provide specialized care for children with neuromuscular disorders and other special needs at the Hospital's two major centers for pediatric care: Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center and the Komansky Center for Children's Health at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. [More]
XenoPort reports preliminary top-line results from arbaclofen placarbil Phase 2b clinical trial in GERD

XenoPort reports preliminary top-line results from arbaclofen placarbil Phase 2b clinical trial in GERD

XenoPort, Inc. announced today preliminary top-line results from a Phase 2b clinical trial of arbaclofen placarbil (also known as AP) as adjunctive therapy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who do not experience complete relief of GERD symptoms while being treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). [More]
Benefits and underutilization of ITB therapy for multiple sclerosis

Benefits and underutilization of ITB therapy for multiple sclerosis

A new scientific article has been published demonstrating the profound impact of spasticity on patients with multiple sclerosis and the benefits and underutilization of intrathecal baclofen (ITB) therapy from Medtronic, Inc. as a treatment option for these patients. [More]
ACG 75th Scientific Meeting to review advances in gastrointestinal research, treatment of digestive diseases

ACG 75th Scientific Meeting to review advances in gastrointestinal research, treatment of digestive diseases

Many of the world's preeminent gastroenterologists will gather for the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 75th Annual Scientific Meeting at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas starting Monday October 18, 2010, to review the latest scientific advances in gastrointestinal research, treatment of digestive diseases and clinical practice management. [More]