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Rice University research targets Parkinson's, Huntington's and other proteasomal diseases

Rice University research targets Parkinson's, Huntington's and other proteasomal diseases

Synthetic genetic circuitry created by researchers at Rice University is helping them see, for the first time, how to regulate cell mechanisms that degrade the misfolded proteins implicated in Parkinson's, Huntington's and other diseases. [More]
New lab at the Nencki Institute conducts research on neurodegenerative diseases

New lab at the Nencki Institute conducts research on neurodegenerative diseases

The Laboratory of Preclinical Studies of Higher Standard, the newest lab of the Neurobiology Center at the Nencki Institute in Warsaw, Poland, will conduct basic research aimed to explain molecular mechanisms responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Novartis Institute researcher receives second annual Andrew Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences

Novartis Institute researcher receives second annual Andrew Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences

Carnegie Mellon University will award the second annual Andrew Carnegie Prize in Mind and Brain Sciences to Ricardo Dolmetsch, global head of neuroscience at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research. [More]
Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Researchers demonstrate accurate identification of amino acids

Some three billion base pairs make up the human genome-the floor plan of life. In 2003, the Human Genome Project announced the successful decryption of this code, a tour de force that continues to supply a stream of insights relevant to human health and disease. [More]
Researchers examine role of antioxidants play in blocking harmful effects of omega 6 fatty acid

Researchers examine role of antioxidants play in blocking harmful effects of omega 6 fatty acid

Given omega 6 fatty acid's reputation for promoting cancer - at least in animal studies - researchers are examining the role that antioxidants play in blocking the harmful effects of this culprit, found in many cooking oils. [More]
UH Math collaborates with Rice on synthetic gene circuit

UH Math collaborates with Rice on synthetic gene circuit

A long-standing challenge in synthetic biology has been to create gene circuits that behave in predictable and robust ways. Mathematical modeling experts from the University of Houston (UH) collaborated with experimental biologists at Rice University to create a synthetic genetic clock that keeps accurate time across a range of temperatures. [More]
Metabolon announces launch of fourth-generation metabolomics platform

Metabolon announces launch of fourth-generation metabolomics platform

Metabolon, Inc., a leader in metabolomics-driven biomarker discovery, announced today the launch of DiscoveryHD4, the company's fourth-generation metabolomics platform. [More]
Study looks at ability of nontoxic molecules to store harmful alpha emitting radioisotopes

Study looks at ability of nontoxic molecules to store harmful alpha emitting radioisotopes

Researchers have discovered that microscopic "bubbles" developed at Kansas State University are safe and effective storage lockers for harmful isotopes that emit ionizing radiation for treating tumors. [More]
Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Beverly L. Davidson, Ph.D., a nationally prominent expert in gene therapy, is joining The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) today. [More]
New mechanism uses light to activate drug-delivery inside body

New mechanism uses light to activate drug-delivery inside body

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body. [More]
New textbook provides facts and dispels myths on sugar/fructose consumption

New textbook provides facts and dispels myths on sugar/fructose consumption

A new textbook, Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sucrose and Health, published this month by Springer Press, under their Humana Press imprint, provides one of the most comprehensive scientific analyses on the closely-watched issue of caloric sweetener consumption. [More]
New research may open door to novel therapies for treating immune disorders

New research may open door to novel therapies for treating immune disorders

A new research discovery published in the April 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology may open the door to new therapies that help treat immune disorders or curb runaway inflammation. Specifically, scientists have discovered a molecule that can induce cell death (apoptosis) in a key type of immune cell (dendritic cells). [More]

UT Southwestern professor honored with 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research

Dr. Benjamin P. Tu, associate professor of biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center, was honored today with the 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research. Dr. Tu was recognized for innovative studies of once-unappreciated molecules that may someday improve treatments for cancer or conditions associated with aging. [More]
Researchers find new drug target for mitochondrial dysfunction

Researchers find new drug target for mitochondrial dysfunction

Mitochondria, long known as "cellular power plants" for their generation of the key energy source adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are essential for proper cellular functions. Mitochondrial defects are often observed in a variety of diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, and are the hallmarks of a number of genetic mitochondrial disorders whose manifestations range from muscle weakness to organ failure. Despite a fairly strong understanding of the pathology of such genetic mitochondrial disorders, efforts to treat them have been largely ineffective. [More]

Research findings help explain rare genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency syndrome

IRCM researchers led by Javier M. Di Noia, PhD, uncovered a new function of AID, a crucial enzyme for the immune response. The discovery, recently published by the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, helps explain a rare genetic disorder that causes an immunodeficiency syndrome. [More]
Discovery could lead to new medications for cancer, say Rice University scientists

Discovery could lead to new medications for cancer, say Rice University scientists

A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell's decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics. [More]

New approach could lead to devising alternative tools for cancer therapy

Inducing biological tissue damage with an atmospheric pressure plasma source could open the door to many applications in medicine [More]
Peach extract prevents breast cancer metastasis in mice

Peach extract prevents breast cancer metastasis in mice

Lab tests at Texas A&M AgriLife Research have shown that treatments with peach extract inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mice. [More]
The Center for Applied Nanotechnology presents a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays

The Center for Applied Nanotechnology presents a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays

The nano-experts from the Center for Applied Nanotechnology (CAN) GmbH expand their product portfolio by CANdotsĀ® Series G - His Detect, which is a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays. It is easy to handle, highly sensitive as well as time saving compared to standard methods available on the market, e.g. ECL. [More]
Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center received grants totaling $600,000 from the March of Dimes Foundation to advance their work in the prevention of premature birth, which affects about one out of nine babies born annually in the U.S. and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]