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MGB Biopharma provides update on business performance for 2014

MGB Biopharma provides update on business performance for 2014

MGB Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company developing a truly novel class of anti-infectives, provides an update on its business performance for 2014. MGB Biopharma is developing a pipeline of novel antimicrobials that puts it at the forefront of addressing the major global problem of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Biogen Idec, Columbia University Medical Center form $30 million genomics research alliance

Biogen Idec, Columbia University Medical Center form $30 million genomics research alliance

Biogen Idec and Columbia University Medical Center have formed a $30 million strategic alliance to conduct genetics discovery research on the underlying causes of disease and to identify new treatment approaches. As part of this agreement, a sequencing and analysis facility and shared postdoctoral program will be established at Columbia to support collaborative genetics studies. [More]
Findings could accelerate development of prebiotic medicines for bowel problems, autoimmune diseases

Findings could accelerate development of prebiotic medicines for bowel problems, autoimmune diseases

Bacteria that have evolved to eat their way through yeast in the human gut could inform the development of new treatments for people suffering from bowel diseases. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers target cells' biological clock to kill cancer cells, shrink tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers target cells' biological clock to kill cancer cells, shrink tumor growth

Cell biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have targeted telomeres with a small molecule called 6-thiodG that takes advantage of the cell's 'biological clock' to kill cancer cells and shrink tumor growth. [More]
Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

Study shows that reprogramming stem cells can prevent cancer following full body radiation

The body has evolved ways to get rid of faulty stem cells. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Stem Cells shows that one of these ways is a "program" that makes stem cells damaged by radiation differentiate into other cells that can no longer survive forever. [More]
People urged to seek healthy eating information from registered dietitian nutritionists

People urged to seek healthy eating information from registered dietitian nutritionists

For many people, the New Year is an opportunity for a fresh look at life - a time to resolve to return to or even begin a healthy lifestyle. [More]
Different antidepressants may affect pregnant women differently

Different antidepressants may affect pregnant women differently

About 15 percent of women in the United States suffer from anxiety disorders and depression during their pregnancies, and many are prescribed antidepressants. However little is known about how early exposure to these medications might affect their offspring as they mature into adults. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at higher risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at higher risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
Scientists discover genetic pathway responsible for brain development

Scientists discover genetic pathway responsible for brain development

Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology and Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology have identified a genetic pathway that accounts for the extraordinary size of the human brain. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern researchers find new potential target for halting tumor growth

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered that brain tumors are capable of burning acetate for fuel, providing a new potential target for halting tumor growth. [More]
Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Study reveals why older people are at increased risk for developing cancer

Why are older people at higher risk for developing cancer? Prevailing opinion holds that, over time, your body's cells accumulate DNA damage and that eventually this damage catches up with the body in a way that causes cancer. [More]
Researchers examine why Mexican-Americans at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes

Researchers examine why Mexican-Americans at increased risk for Type 2 diabetes

While people of Mexican ancestry are nearly twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes as people of European heritage, the majority of research in this area has focused on those of European origin. [More]
Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

The new recipients of Germany's most prestigious research funding prize have been announced. In Bonn today, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) decided to award the 2015 Leibniz Prize to eight researchers. [More]
Two UT Arlington professors named National Academy of Inventors Fellows

Two UT Arlington professors named National Academy of Inventors Fellows

Two University of Texas at Arlington professors known for their innovation in the world of chemistry have been named Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. [More]
Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

A study conducted by University of Granada scientists (from the Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Departments) and from the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada) has demonstrated that delaying the cutting of the umbilical cord in newborns by two minutes leads to a better development of the baby during the first days of life. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism that helps white fat cells to become browner

Researchers uncover mechanism that helps white fat cells to become browner

White adipose tissue stores excess calories as fat that can be released for use in other organs during fasting. Mammals also have small amounts of brown adipose tissue, which primarily acts as an effective fat burner for the production of heat. Now researchers from the University of Southern Denmark have uncovered the mechanism by which white fat cells from humans gets reprogrammed to become browner. [More]
Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

When we acquire diarrhea on a vacation, it is often caused by a bacterial infection. Now a Danish research team is working on a new type of vaccine design targeting the disease causing bacterium - if it works it may very well revolutionize not only the prevention of this disease, but also offer protection against other pathogens with a heavy disease burden such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). [More]
MU researcher recognized as AAAS Fellow for contributions to ophthalmology research

MU researcher recognized as AAAS Fellow for contributions to ophthalmology research

Cataracts, a clouding of the lens in the eye leading to vision loss, affects more than 24 million people in the United States, according to National Institutes of Health estimates. Often linked to the natural process of aging, cataracts are a major cause of blindness worldwide. K. Krishna Sharma, an ophthalmology researcher at the University of Missouri, has worked for more than two decades to study the mechanisms involved in this degenerative disease. [More]
IRCM researchers uncover mechanism that regulates dopamine levels in the brain

IRCM researchers uncover mechanism that regulates dopamine levels in the brain

Researchers in Montréal led by Jacques Drouin, D.Sc., uncovered a mechanism regulating dopamine levels in the brain by working on a mouse model of late onset Parkinson's disease. [More]
UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern Medical Center microbiologists have identified key bacteria in the gut whose resources are hijacked to spread harmful foodborne E. coli infections and other intestinal illnesses. [More]