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Metabolon announces launch of fourth-generation metabolomics platform

Metabolon announces launch of fourth-generation metabolomics platform

Metabolon, Inc., a leader in metabolomics-driven biomarker discovery, announced today the launch of DiscoveryHD4, the company's fourth-generation metabolomics platform. [More]
Study looks at ability of nontoxic molecules to store harmful alpha emitting radioisotopes

Study looks at ability of nontoxic molecules to store harmful alpha emitting radioisotopes

Researchers have discovered that microscopic "bubbles" developed at Kansas State University are safe and effective storage lockers for harmful isotopes that emit ionizing radiation for treating tumors. [More]
Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Beverly L. Davidson, Ph.D., a nationally prominent expert in gene therapy, is joining The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) today. [More]
New mechanism uses light to activate drug-delivery inside body

New mechanism uses light to activate drug-delivery inside body

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in collaboration with materials scientists, engineers and neurobiologists, have discovered a new mechanism for using light to activate drug-delivering nanoparticles and other targeted therapeutic substances inside the body. [More]
New textbook provides facts and dispels myths on sugar/fructose consumption

New textbook provides facts and dispels myths on sugar/fructose consumption

A new textbook, Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Sucrose and Health, published this month by Springer Press, under their Humana Press imprint, provides one of the most comprehensive scientific analyses on the closely-watched issue of caloric sweetener consumption. [More]
New research may open door to novel therapies for treating immune disorders

New research may open door to novel therapies for treating immune disorders

A new research discovery published in the April 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology may open the door to new therapies that help treat immune disorders or curb runaway inflammation. Specifically, scientists have discovered a molecule that can induce cell death (apoptosis) in a key type of immune cell (dendritic cells). [More]

UT Southwestern professor honored with 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research

Dr. Benjamin P. Tu, associate professor of biochemistry at UT Southwestern Medical Center, was honored today with the 2014 Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research. Dr. Tu was recognized for innovative studies of once-unappreciated molecules that may someday improve treatments for cancer or conditions associated with aging. [More]
Researchers find new drug target for mitochondrial dysfunction

Researchers find new drug target for mitochondrial dysfunction

Mitochondria, long known as "cellular power plants" for their generation of the key energy source adenosine triphosphate (ATP), are essential for proper cellular functions. Mitochondrial defects are often observed in a variety of diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, and are the hallmarks of a number of genetic mitochondrial disorders whose manifestations range from muscle weakness to organ failure. Despite a fairly strong understanding of the pathology of such genetic mitochondrial disorders, efforts to treat them have been largely ineffective. [More]
Research findings help explain rare genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency syndrome

Research findings help explain rare genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency syndrome

IRCM researchers led by Javier M. Di Noia, PhD, uncovered a new function of AID, a crucial enzyme for the immune response. The discovery, recently published by the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, helps explain a rare genetic disorder that causes an immunodeficiency syndrome. [More]
Discovery could lead to new medications for cancer, say Rice University scientists

Discovery could lead to new medications for cancer, say Rice University scientists

A new understanding of proteins at the nexus of a cell's decision to survive or die has implications for researchers who study cancer and age-related diseases, according to biophysicists at the Rice University-based Center for Theoretical Biological Physics. [More]

New approach could lead to devising alternative tools for cancer therapy

Inducing biological tissue damage with an atmospheric pressure plasma source could open the door to many applications in medicine [More]
Peach extract prevents breast cancer metastasis in mice

Peach extract prevents breast cancer metastasis in mice

Lab tests at Texas A&M AgriLife Research have shown that treatments with peach extract inhibit breast cancer metastasis in mice. [More]
The Center for Applied Nanotechnology presents a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays

The Center for Applied Nanotechnology presents a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays

The nano-experts from the Center for Applied Nanotechnology (CAN) GmbH expand their product portfolio by CANdots® Series G - His Detect, which is a ready-to-use reagent for the detection of poly-histidine tagged proteins in Blot assays. It is easy to handle, highly sensitive as well as time saving compared to standard methods available on the market, e.g. ECL. [More]
Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers receive grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center received grants totaling $600,000 from the March of Dimes Foundation to advance their work in the prevention of premature birth, which affects about one out of nine babies born annually in the U.S. and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]
New technology gives tool to examine membrane proteins in natural environment of human cell

New technology gives tool to examine membrane proteins in natural environment of human cell

​Scientists have a better way to study human proteins - large molecules that are part of every cell in the body - thanks to a new technology developed by University of Toronto researchers. [More]

UTSW awarded March of Dimes grants to advance work in prevention of premature birth

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center received grants totaling $600,000 from the March of Dimes Foundation to advance their work in the prevention of premature birth, which affects about one out of nine babies born annually in the U.S. and is the leading cause of newborn death. [More]
Research findings may be beneficial for creation of purer HSC lines for clinical treatments

Research findings may be beneficial for creation of purer HSC lines for clinical treatments

Hematopoietic stem cells are now routinely used to treat patients with cancers and other disorders of the blood and immune systems, but researchers knew little about the progenitor cells that give rise to them during embryonic development. [More]

DUF1220 protein domain also linked to severity of autism

The same gene family that may have helped the human brain become larger and more complex than in any other animal also is linked to the severity of autism, according to new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Scientists produce antibiotic whose biological activity can be controlled with light

Scientists produce antibiotic whose biological activity can be controlled with light

Scientists of the KIT and the University of Kiev have produced an antibiotic, whose biological activity can be controlled with light. Thanks to the robust diarylethene photoswitch, the antimicrobial effect of the peptide mimetic can be applied in a spatially and temporally specific manner. [More]
Scientists unlock one of mysteries of modern genetics

Scientists unlock one of mysteries of modern genetics

Scientists at Indiana University have unlocked one of the mysteries of modern genetics: how acquired traits can be passed between generations in a process called epigenetic inheritance. The new work finds that cells don't know to silence some genes based on information hardwired into their DNA sequences, but recognize heritable chemical marks that are added to the genes. These chemical tags serve as a form of molecular memory, allowing cells to recognize the genes and remember to silence them again in each new generation. [More]