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Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Baylor College of Medicine and the Georgia Regents University, report for the first time that the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin inhibits the growth of human uterine fibroid tumors. [More]
Research shows mustard and garlic receptor is linked to cold-induced pain

Research shows mustard and garlic receptor is linked to cold-induced pain

Some people experience cold not only as feeling cold, but actually as a painful sensation. This applies even to fairly mild temperatures - anything below 20°C. [More]
USC researcher receives first Broad Fellowship to study kidney stem cells

USC researcher receives first Broad Fellowship to study kidney stem cells

What makes stem cells develop into kidneys? Lori O'Brien, a postdoctoral research associate in the laboratory of Andy McMahon, has received the first Broad Fellowship to help answer this question. [More]
Funding makes next-generation scientific equipment available to CBC research community

Funding makes next-generation scientific equipment available to CBC research community

The Chicago Biomedical Consortium is announcing a $3 million Infrastructure Initiative to promote investment in high-impact, next-generation scientific equipment at its member universities. The Initiative aims to make modern and powerful tools available to the CBC research community at a time when federal grants for scientific infrastructure are scarce. [More]
New findings could help develop therapeutic options for glycogen storage disease

New findings could help develop therapeutic options for glycogen storage disease

Glycogen storage disorders, which affect the body's ability to process sugar and store energy, are rare metabolic conditions that frequently manifest in the first years of life. Often accompanied by liver and muscle disease, this inability to process and store glucose can have many different causes, and can be difficult to diagnose. [More]
Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Synapses are the sites that connect neurons – sites where information is passed from one neuron to another. They are highly specialized structures and synaptic function is crucial for normal brain function. [More]
Researchers refine diagnostic tools to predict treatment outcomes for children with neuroblastoma

Researchers refine diagnostic tools to predict treatment outcomes for children with neuroblastoma

Oncology researchers studying gene mutations in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are refining their diagnostic tools to predict which patients are more likely to respond to drugs called ALK inhibitors that target such mutations. Removing some of the guesswork in diagnosis and treatment, the researchers say, may lead to more successful outcomes for children with this often-deadly cancer. [More]
New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

New vaccination approach can reduce tumor burden, suppress formation of lung metastases

In a new study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget researchers from Uppsala University show that a therapeutic vaccine directed against tumor vessels can reduce tumor burden and suppress formation of spontaneous lung metastases in a mouse model for metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Researchers obtain detailed picture of how Gas5 RNA interacts with steroid hormone receptors

Researchers obtain detailed picture of how Gas5 RNA interacts with steroid hormone receptors

It arises from what scientists previously described as "junk DNA" or "the dark matter of the genome," but this gene is definitely not junk. [More]
IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a small protein with a big role in lowering plasma glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity. [More]
Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Almost everyone knows that improving your eating habits will most likely improve your health. What most people may not know, however, is that the effects of poor eating habits persist long after dietary habits are improved. In a new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, scientists use mice to show that even after successful treatment of atherosclerosis (including lowering of blood cholesterol and a change in dietary habits) the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle still affect the way the immune system functions. [More]
3D brain-like tissue: an interview with Professor David Kaplan, Tufts University

3D brain-like tissue: an interview with Professor David Kaplan, Tufts University

In 2D, neurons tend to form limited connectivity reflective of the 3D complexity in the brain and have more limited cultivation time before reduction in functions. [More]
Researchers to develop new tests to evaluate cognitive growth in people with intellectual disability

Researchers to develop new tests to evaluate cognitive growth in people with intellectual disability

Leading researchers, funded through a new, five-year, $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, are collaborating to develop and evaluate tests designed to measure and track changes in the cognitive functioning of people who typically are difficult to assess accurately: those with an intellectual disability, formerly termed mental retardation. [More]
Sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to the bladder

Sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to the bladder

If you think sleep problems and bladder problems are a fact of life in old age, you may be right. A new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that our sleep-wake cycles are genetically connected to our bladder, and disruptions to one may cause problems with the other. [More]
Changes in cell metabolism slow growth of colorectal cancer

Changes in cell metabolism slow growth of colorectal cancer

Cancer is an unwanted experiment in progress. As the disease advances, tumor cells accumulate mutations, eventually arriving at ones that give them the insidious power to grow uncontrollably and spread. Distinguishing drivers of cancer from benign mutations open opportunities for developing targeted cancer therapies. [More]
New blood test could predict early onset Alzheimer’s disease with high accuracy

New blood test could predict early onset Alzheimer’s disease with high accuracy

The research team previously identified that changes in the brain occur two decades before patients show signs of dementia. These changes can be detected through expensive brain imaging procedures. [More]
Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer. [More]
UT Southwestern assistant professor named Moore Investigator in Data-Driven Discovery

UT Southwestern assistant professor named Moore Investigator in Data-Driven Discovery

Dr. Kimberly Reynolds, Assistant Professor in the Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational, and Systems Biology and in the Department of Biophysics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has been named one of 14 Moore Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery. [More]
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of Michigan State University scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer. [More]