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Springer publishes new online-only journal, ChemTexts

Springer publishes new online-only journal, ChemTexts

Beginning in 2015, Springer will publish a new online-only journal called ChemTexts -The Textbook Journal of Chemistry. [More]
Mindray net revenues increase 8.9% to $334.5 million in Q2 2014

Mindray net revenues increase 8.9% to $334.5 million in Q2 2014

Mindray Medical International Limited, a leading developer, manufacturer and marketer of medical devices worldwide, announced today its selected unaudited financial results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2014. [More]
Scientists find new clues to early detection, personalised treatment of ovarian cancer

Scientists find new clues to early detection, personalised treatment of ovarian cancer

Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology and the Bioinformatics Institute have found new clues to early detection and personalised treatment of ovarian cancer, currently one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose early due to the lack of symptoms that are unique to the illness. [More]
Discovery lays groundwork for new class of antibiotics for Staphylococcus aureus infections

Discovery lays groundwork for new class of antibiotics for Staphylococcus aureus infections

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered an enzyme that regulates production of the toxins that contribute to potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus infections. The study recently appeared in the scientific journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]

Engineers create truly portable device for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

A team of engineers at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), Schlumberger-Doll Research Center in Cambridge, Mass., and the University of Texas, Austin, have created a truly portable device for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. [More]
Researchers receive $435K to study how environmental factors affect genes that cause autism

Researchers receive $435K to study how environmental factors affect genes that cause autism

Over the last decade, autism research has been primarily focused on finding genes that may "cause" autism. However, little information exists on gene-environment interactions that may increase risk for autism. [More]
Researchers study effect of alcohol on neural activity using fruit flies

Researchers study effect of alcohol on neural activity using fruit flies

Seeking eventual solutions to problems ranging from alcoholism, cancer and Alzheimer's to finding better ways to clean contact lenses and use Lego models to build bridges, University of Houston (UH) students devoted the summer to some serious scholarship. [More]
Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

Researchers at NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology achieve breakthrough biological results using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope

FEI is pleased to announce that researchers at the NIH-FEI Living Lab for Structural Biology have achieved breakthrough biological results, using FEI’s Titan Krios™ transmission electron microscope (TEM), to elucidate the structural mechanism by which glutamate receptors participate in the transmission of signals between neurons in the brain. Their work is described in Nature, “Structural Mechanism of Glutamate Receptor Activation and Desensitization,” by Meyerson, et al., (DOI: 10.1038/nature13603), http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13603.html . [More]
Researchers describe how PAI-1 protein behaves in its short life

Researchers describe how PAI-1 protein behaves in its short life

The human body contains a unique protein that has the unusual property of destroying itself after a few hours of existence - it must therefore be continually recreated and is no stable protein. [More]
Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists at Duke University report. [More]
Modulation of B cells may effectively treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis

Modulation of B cells may effectively treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis

Going to the dentist isn't fun for anyone, but for those with periodontal disease related to type 2 diabetes, a new research discovery may have them smiling. [More]
Findings advance fundamental understanding of DNA damage by UV rays

Findings advance fundamental understanding of DNA damage by UV rays

In the same week that the U.S. surgeon general issued a 101-page report about the dangers of skin cancer, researchers at Montana State University published a paper breaking new ground on how DNA - the genetic code in every cell - responds when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light. [More]
Rice, Baylor scientists analyze how influenza-related proteins help infect cells

Rice, Baylor scientists analyze how influenza-related proteins help infect cells

A flu virus acts like a Trojan horse as it attacks and infects host cells. Scientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have acquired a clearer view of the well-hidden mechanism involved. [More]
OUP, CINP partner to publish International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology

OUP, CINP partner to publish International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce its new relationship with the International College of Neuropsychopharmacology. [More]
Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

Researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with activity of mutated cancer gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
Biochemists report advance in production of functional mirror-image proteins

Biochemists report advance in production of functional mirror-image proteins

University of Utah biochemists have reported an advance in the production of functional mirror-image proteins. [More]
Study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate negative impacts of stress

Study suggests healthy diet, sleep and exercise can mitigate negative impacts of stress

A new study from UC San Francisco is the first to show that while the impact of life's stressors accumulate overtime and accelerate cellular aging, these negative effects may be reduced by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising and sleeping well. [More]
Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

Cancer researchers find molecule that irreversibly interferes with KRAS gene

UT Southwestern Medical Center cancer researchers have found a molecule that selectively and irreversibly interferes with the activity of a mutated cancer gene common in 30 percent of tumors. [More]
BU researchers find possible way to prevent Alzheimer's disease

BU researchers find possible way to prevent Alzheimer's disease

Boston University School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease (AD). They discovered that pre-treatment of neurons with the anti-aging protein Klotho can prevent neuron death in the presence of the toxic amyloid protein and glutamate. [More]
Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Researchers at UC San Francisco (UCSF) have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system. [More]