Biochemistry News and Research RSS Feed - Biochemistry News and Research

Simple paper test could confirm presence of illnesses even before patients feel symptoms

Simple paper test could confirm presence of illnesses even before patients feel symptoms

A multi-disciplinary team of researchers has developed a new diagnostic test that can change the medical landscape by making it possible for patients to quickly determine if they are infected with an illness, using a simple paper test sensitive enough to detect markers of various illnesses using minute amounts of blood, sweat, or other biological material. [More]
New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

New mechanism of differentiation may offer novel therapeutic approaches to blood malignancies, solid tumors

In humans the differentiation of stem cells into hundreds of specialized cell types is vital. Differentiation drives development from fertilized egg to a newborn, and it underlies the continuous replacement of the 5 billion cells that die every hour in an adult. On the downside, mutations in differentiation pathways of different cell types can be drivers of cancers. [More]
Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emerges as fast, cost-efficient method for biomass analysis

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emerges as fast, cost-efficient method for biomass analysis

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is emerging as a fast, cost-efficient method for identifying the total amount and specific compounds that comprise the inorganic component of biomass. Accurate and reliable analysis of these minerals, such as aluminum, calcium, iron, and silicon is essential, as this "ash" can cause problems when converting biomass to hydrocarbon biofuels, as described in a study published in Industrial Biotechnology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Discoveries could lead to development of novel therapies to prevent C. diff infection

Discoveries could lead to development of novel therapies to prevent C. diff infection

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have obtained the crystal structure of a toxin from the bacterium Clostridium difficile ("C. diff") -- the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States. [More]
Excess folic acid intake causes lowered immune function in aged mice

Excess folic acid intake causes lowered immune function in aged mice

Previous studies have shown an association between high folic acid intake and a reduction in the immune system defenses needed to fight viral infections and cancer. In a new study in mice published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University set out to determine if excess folic acid intake caused adverse changes in the immune system. [More]
Finding may aid in the design of potential therapies for thyroid problems

Finding may aid in the design of potential therapies for thyroid problems

Thyroid disease affects about 12 percent of the U.S. population. While many people with thyroid disease don't even know they have it, an overactive or underactive thyroid can cause a slew of problems, including weight gain or loss, mood changes and infertility. In children, an underactive thyroid can be fatal, which is why they are tested for a deficiency at birth. [More]
UTA researchers map out chemical mechanism of key enzyme found in autism, Alzheimer's and Down syndrome

UTA researchers map out chemical mechanism of key enzyme found in autism, Alzheimer's and Down syndrome

Biochemists at The University of Texas at Arlington are mapping the catalytic processes of sulfur-oxidizing enzymes to improve understanding of the chemical imbalances found in patients with autism, Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. [More]
Salk Institute scientists find new target for glioblastoma multiforme treatment

Salk Institute scientists find new target for glioblastoma multiforme treatment

Glioblastoma multiforme is a particularly deadly cancer. A person diagnosed with this type of brain tumor typically survives 15 months, if given the best care. The late Senator Ted Kennedy succumbed to this disease in just over a year. [More]
Low-oxygen exposure shortly after birth may increase learning and behavioral disorder risks

Low-oxygen exposure shortly after birth may increase learning and behavioral disorder risks

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, shows that the development of white matter in the mouse brains is delayed when they are exposed to chronic low oxygen levels shortly after birth. [More]
Antiscarring paste can halt fibrosis caused by radiation treatment

Antiscarring paste can halt fibrosis caused by radiation treatment

An antiscarring paste when applied to the skin of mice halts fibrosis caused by the radiation used in cancer therapy. That is according to a study led by researchers at Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center to be published tomorrow in the January edition of the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, or FASEB. [More]
Researchers suggest microorganisms in the womb set stage for health problems later in life

Researchers suggest microorganisms in the womb set stage for health problems later in life

Researchers review importance of microorganisms that exist in the gut, suggesting perturbation of the environment during pregnancy, delivery and early infancy could impact the developing baby's early microbiome and set the stage for health problems later in life. The term "microbiome" refers to the trillions of organisms we harbor, on our skin and within our respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. [More]
Scientists pin down structure of neuronal protein clumps associated with ALS

Scientists pin down structure of neuronal protein clumps associated with ALS

To create treatments for a disease without any, scientists need to study and understand the driving forces behind the faulty biology. Today, researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine announced the first-ever evidence-based description of the neuronal protein clumps thought to be important in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, a fatal neurodegenerative condition. [More]
Researchers identify inherited traits related to sleep, wake and activity cycles

Researchers identify inherited traits related to sleep, wake and activity cycles

In the first study of its kind, a team of international scientists led by UT Southwestern Medical Center and UCLA researchers have identified a dozen inherited traits related to sleep, wake, and activity cycles that are associated with severe bipolar disorder. [More]
Researchers identify 124 protein targets of artemisinin in most pathogenic malaria parasite

Researchers identify 124 protein targets of artemisinin in most pathogenic malaria parasite

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has uncovered the mystery behind the potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin, a drug that is considered to be the last line of defence against malaria. Given the emergence of artemisinin resistance, these findings could potentially lead to the design of new treatments against drug-resistant parasites. [More]
NUS scientists uncover mystery behind potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin

NUS scientists uncover mystery behind potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has uncovered the mystery behind the potent parasite-killing effect of artemisinin, a drug that is considered to be the last line of defence against malaria. Given the emergence of artemisinin resistance, these findings could potentially lead to the design of new treatments against drug-resistant parasites. [More]
Cholesterol essential for health, but also plays key role in longevity

Cholesterol essential for health, but also plays key role in longevity

Animals from tiny worms to human beings have a love-hate relationship with fats and lipids. Cholesterol is a famous example of how they are both essential for health and often have a role in death. [More]
IL obtains 510(k) clearance for ACL TOP Family 50 Series Hemostasis Testing Systems

IL obtains 510(k) clearance for ACL TOP Family 50 Series Hemostasis Testing Systems

Instrumentation Laboratory today announced the 510(k) clearance of their latest innovation, the ACL TOP Family 50 Series Hemostasis Testing Systems, by the US Food and Drug Administration. [More]
New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

New study improves understanding of metal-based chemotherapy drugs

What is the mechanism of action of metal-based chemotherapy drugs (the most widely used for treating common cancers like testicular or ovarian cancer)? How can we improve their effect and reduce their toxicity? A new study combining experiments and theory has broadened our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of these active drugs to help experimentalists devising increasingly effective drugs with fewer side effects. [More]
UMMS researchers identify new life cycle stage in HIV infection

UMMS researchers identify new life cycle stage in HIV infection

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have identified a new life cycle stage in HIV infection, thanks to a novel technique they developed to take images of intact infected cells. [More]
Mitochondrial variation and viable pregnancy: an interview with Dr Elpida Fragouli

Mitochondrial variation and viable pregnancy: an interview with Dr Elpida Fragouli

Embryos require adequate amounts of energy so that they can successfully progress through each of their cell divisions. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement