Biochemistry News and Research RSS Feed - Biochemistry News and Research

Scientists aim to develop latest biosensors for personalized medicine, drug development

Scientists aim to develop latest biosensors for personalized medicine, drug development

Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology in Berlin-Buch and the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena cooperate in the future for the development of the latest biosensors for usage related to personalized medicine and drug development. [More]
Advanced assay offers better sensitivity for detecting a prion disease affecting elk

Advanced assay offers better sensitivity for detecting a prion disease affecting elk

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), or prion diseases, are a family of rare progressive, neurodegenerative illnesses that affect both humans and animals. TSE surveillance is important for public health and food safety because TSEs have the potential of crossing from animals to humans, as seen with the spread of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). A study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes an advanced assay that offers better sensitivity than currently available tests for detecting a prion disease affecting elk. [More]
Noviplex card could accelerate testing for Zika virus in the Amazonian region of Brazil

Noviplex card could accelerate testing for Zika virus in the Amazonian region of Brazil

A University of Nebraska-Lincoln researcher is partnering with Brazilian officials to distribute a device that could accelerate testing for the Zika virus and monitor contamination of the country's freshwater food sources. [More]
Chemists design set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons

Chemists design set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons

Chemists at the University of California San Diego have designed a set of molecules that promote microscopic, anatomical changes in neurons associated with the formation and retention of memories. These drug candidates also prevent deterioration of the same neuronal structures in the presence of amyloid-beta, a protein fragment that accumulates in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study reveals new activation mechanism for protein kinases

Study reveals new activation mechanism for protein kinases

Protein kinases, most scientists would agree, regulate nearly every aspect of cell life. It is no surprise, then, that having faulty protein kinases may lead to a number of human conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes. [More]
AstraZeneca, MedImmune to present new clinical trial and scientific data on lung cancer treatments at ELCC 2016

AstraZeneca, MedImmune to present new clinical trial and scientific data on lung cancer treatments at ELCC 2016

AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, will report new clinical trial and scientific data from their industry-leading lung cancer franchise of marketed and pipeline medicines at the European Lung Cancer Conference in Geneva, Switzerland, 13 -16 April 2016. [More]
Immune-boosting formulation in Chinese herbal remedies comes from bacteria growing on Angelica roots

Immune-boosting formulation in Chinese herbal remedies comes from bacteria growing on Angelica roots

Juzen-taiho-to, also known as shi quan da bu tang, is one of the most popular herbal formulas in China and Japan and is used in the West by practitioners of traditional Asian medicine. New research suggests the remedy's immune-boosting effects are due, at least in part, to bacteria that grow on the roots of one of the formula's component herbs. [More]
Study shows epidermal growth factor negatively regulates shedding of epithelial cells

Study shows epidermal growth factor negatively regulates shedding of epithelial cells

The lining of the intestine is the most rapidly-renewing tissue in the body. Routine shedding of epithelial cells from this lining is a key element of tissue turnover, and is thus essential to maintaining optimal health. Altered shedding is associated with multiple disorders, ranging from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to colorectal cancer. [More]
Artificial mimic of protein could lead to new ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells

Artificial mimic of protein could lead to new ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells

An artificial mimic of a key light-sensitive molecule has been made by scientists at the University of Bristol. The work, published in Science, could lead to new ways of building light-sensitive artificial cells. [More]
Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

A study by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has found that blocking the blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help reduce their growth and delay the regrowth process after treatment. Small cell lung cancer is considered the most lethal of all lung cancers. [More]
Scientists successfully turn off misbehaving protein that fuels growth of triple-negative breast cancer

Scientists successfully turn off misbehaving protein that fuels growth of triple-negative breast cancer

Working with human breast cancer cells, a team of scientists from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have successfully turned off a misbehaving protein that fuels the growth of a particularly aggressive, drug-resistant form of the disease known as triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

A research team led by University of Arkansas chemist Jingyi Chen and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences microbiologist Mark Smeltzer has developed an alternative therapeutic approach to fighting antibiotic-resistant infections. [More]
Researchers use novel technology to sequence Y chromosome in malaria spreading mosquitoes

Researchers use novel technology to sequence Y chromosome in malaria spreading mosquitoes

A team of researchers with the Fralin Life Science Institute at Virginia Tech, working with a large international consortium, has sequenced the Y chromosome--the genetic driver of sex-determination and male fertility-- in a family of malaria spreading mosquitoes. [More]
Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Novel way of hitting prostate cancer

Researchers at UC Davis, in collaboration with the other institutions, have found that suppressing the nuclear receptor protein ROR-γ with small-molecule compounds can reduce androgen receptor (AR) levels in castration-resistant prostate cancer and stop tumor growth. [More]
SLU scientist describes several tactics that can help cells overcome lesions

SLU scientist describes several tactics that can help cells overcome lesions

In a recent review paper published in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, SLU scientist Alessandro Vindigni, Ph.D., describes the strategies cells use when their DNA faces replication stress, challenges that may derail a cell's ability to reproduce. [More]
New form of molecular tags enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold

New form of molecular tags enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold

Duke University researchers have taken a major step towards realizing a new form of MRI that could record biochemical reactions in the body as they happen. [More]
Research shows tumor suppressor protein regulates polarity genes

Research shows tumor suppressor protein regulates polarity genes

What does Brad Pitt have in common with a fruit fly? His Hollywood hairstyles cover a prominent cowlick - the swirl of hair that that is caused by a patterning mechanism also active in our two-winged friends -- that similarly feature "polarized" hair patterns. [More]
Extracellular vesicle isolation and characterization: an interview with Dr Carley Ross

Extracellular vesicle isolation and characterization: an interview with Dr Carley Ross

Extracellular vesicles are membrane surrounded structures released by cells in an evolutionally conserved manner. There are three main types of EVs, Exosomes (50-100 nm), Microparticles (200 nm-1 um) and Apoptotic bodies. [More]
Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

The largest genetic study on the bacterium responsible for epidemic dysentery has revealed that the Shigella dysenteriae pathogen, which remains a real scourge in Africa and Asia, probably originated in Europe. [More]
Computer-assisted methods may help as decision support system to combat Zika virus

Computer-assisted methods may help as decision support system to combat Zika virus

Global climate change, international travel, and ineffective vector control programs are aiding the emergence of infectious diseases globally. The currently expanding Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic is one such problem. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement