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Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Schools are commonly known as breeding grounds for viruses and bacteria, but this may not necessarily be linked to hygiene. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
Home test using paper strips could help detect cancer, malaria

Home test using paper strips could help detect cancer, malaria

What if testing yourself for cancer or other diseases were as easy as testing your blood sugar or taking a home pregnancy test? In a few years, it might be. [More]
Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, half of whom will die from the disease within 5 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Scientists discover how faulty genetic instructions contribute to development of AML

Scientists discover how faulty genetic instructions contribute to development of AML

Scientists have previously identified a series of genetic errors that commonly occur inside cancerous blood cells, but it hasn't been clear exactly how those genetic malfunctions create immature blood cells that overpopulate, crowd out healthy cells and spread in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or AML. [More]
Researchers find link between clu and genes that cause Parkinson's disease

Researchers find link between clu and genes that cause Parkinson's disease

The fruit fly may help us be less clueless about human muscle development and Parkinson's disease. [More]
Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

A phase 1 clinical trial testing a novel combination therapy developed by scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center slowed the growth of cancer in the majority of trial participants, which were patients with advanced solid tumors. [More]
Researchers reveal DNA unwrapping can happen asymmetrically to expose specific genes

Researchers reveal DNA unwrapping can happen asymmetrically to expose specific genes

The protein complex that holds strands of DNA in compact spools partially disassembles itself to help genes reveal themselves to specialized proteins and enzymes for activation, according to Rice University researchers and their colleagues. [More]
Insilico Medicine collaborates with Asia Genomics to develop advanced personalized longevity suite

Insilico Medicine collaborates with Asia Genomics to develop advanced personalized longevity suite

Insilico Medicine Inc, a big data analytics company located at the Emerging Technology Centers at the Johns Hopkins University at Eastern, announced an agreement with Asia Genomics, a Singapore-based rapidly growing molecular diagnostics company specializing in clinical genomics & genetic testing operating in major Asian countries including Vietnam, Malaysia and China. [More]
Knocking out genes in E. coli affects stiffness, integrity of bacterial envelope

Knocking out genes in E. coli affects stiffness, integrity of bacterial envelope

An exhaustive look at how bacteria hold their ground and avoid getting pushed around by their environment shows how dozens of genes aid the essential job of protecting cells from popping when tensions run high. [More]
New analytical technology could improve cancer treatment by establishing ideal dosing regimens

New analytical technology could improve cancer treatment by establishing ideal dosing regimens

University of Oklahoma researchers will apply a new analytical technology that could ultimately provide a powerful tool for improved treatment of cancer patients in Oklahoma and beyond. Using mass spectrometry, an analytical instrument for sensitive detection and accurate [More]
CD36 receptor in nasal sensory neurons may be linked to preference for fatty food

CD36 receptor in nasal sensory neurons may be linked to preference for fatty food

A paper by Brazilian researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports describes a study showing that a subgroup of olfactory neurons in the nasal cavity express a cellular receptor specializing in the transport of lipid molecules. [More]
New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease

New study may help unveil structure and behavior of neurotoxic oligomers in Alzheimer's disease

Much of the research on Alzheimer's disease has focused on the amyloid beta protein, which clumps together into sticky fibrils that form deposits in the brains of people with the disease. [More]
Findings may help explain why rheumatoid arthritis drugs vary in effect

Findings may help explain why rheumatoid arthritis drugs vary in effect

Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Pennsylvania and China, report that not only are there distinct differences in key cellular processes and molecular signatures between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) but, more surprisingly, there are joint-specific differences in RA. [More]
New RNA aptamer can prevent pathogenic protein misfolding

New RNA aptamer can prevent pathogenic protein misfolding

Several diseases occur when mutations cause misfolding of proteins. These include "serpinopathies" which is a group of rare heritable diseases. They are caused by mutations of so-called "serpin" inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes involved in blood coagulation, tissue remodeling, and other important physiological functions. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Researchers receive $2.4 million grant to study effects of parenting on behavior of adolescents with FXS

Researchers receive $2.4 million grant to study effects of parenting on behavior of adolescents with FXS

University of Kansas researchers have been awarded a five-year, $2.4 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to study the effects of parenting on the development and behavior of adolescents with Fragile X syndrome, a single-gene disorder that is the most common cause of inherited developmental disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Understanding DNA scrunching could help develop novel ways to fight infections

Understanding DNA scrunching could help develop novel ways to fight infections

Evidence of DNA "scrunching" may one day lead to a new class of drugs against viruses, according to a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Columbia University. [More]
Myricitrin may play role in preventing neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease

Myricitrin may play role in preventing neuronal degeneration in Parkinson's disease

A new study has shown that myricitrin, a flavinoid with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity that is present inedible plants and fruit, can protect mouse brains from the loss of dopamine-producing neurons caused by neurotoxicity. [More]
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