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Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Bielefeld University chemists develop copper molecule that could help prevent spread of cancer

Chemists at Bielefeld University have developed a molecule containing copper that binds specifically with DNA and prevents the spread of cancer. First results show that it kills the cancer cells more quickly than cisplatin - a widely used anti-cancer drug that is frequently administered in chemotherapy. [More]
Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Boosting anti-cancer immunity through diet and novel drug therapies—that's the idea behind a collaborative project involving researchers from the South Dakota State University College of Pharmacy and Sanford Research in Sioux Falls. [More]
UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists have developed a peptide that sticks to the protein that causes Parkinson's disease, stopping it from killing brain cells. The research highlights a potential new route for slowing the progress of this incurable disease. [More]
Intrinsically disordered proteins have ability to alter their configuration

Intrinsically disordered proteins have ability to alter their configuration

Like the shape-shifting robots of "Transformers" fame, a unique class of proteins in the human body also has the ability to alter their configuration. These so-named intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) lack a fixed or ordered three-dimensional structure, which can be influenced by exposure to various chemicals and cellular modifications. [More]
Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases. [More]
Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists are trying to deliver a stern wake-up call to the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. [More]
Industrial Biotechnology presents insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity

Industrial Biotechnology presents insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity

Novel nanomaterials derived from cellulose have many promising industrial applications, are biobased and biodegradable, and can be produced at relatively low cost. Their potential toxicity--whether ingested, inhaled, on contact with the skin, or on exposure to cells within the body--is a topic of intense discussion, and the latest evidence and insights on cellulose nanocrystal toxicity are presented in a Review article in Industrial Biotechnology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Evolution of two protein kinases may hold key to unlocking highly specific cancer drugs

Evolution of two protein kinases may hold key to unlocking highly specific cancer drugs

This is the story of Abl and Src -- two nearly identical protein kinases whose evolution may hold the key to unlocking new, highly specific cancer drugs. [More]
Research findings could someday lead to new treatments for patients with autism and cancer

Research findings could someday lead to new treatments for patients with autism and cancer

In recent years, scientists have found a surprising a connection between some people with autism and certain cancer patients: They have mutations in the same gene, one that codes for a protein critical for normal cellular health. Now scientists have reported in the ACS journal Biochemistry that the defects reduce the activity and stability of the protein. [More]
Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

Researchers report development of first 3D tissue-engineered system

A team led by researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering and the University of Pavia has reported development of the first three-dimensional tissue system that reproduces the complex structure and physiology of human bone marrow and successfully generates functional human platelets. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new drug candidate against HIV

TSRI scientists develop new drug candidate against HIV

In a remarkable new advance against the virus that causes AIDS, scientists from the Jupiter, Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have announced the creation of a novel drug candidate that is so potent and universally effective, it might work as part of an unconventional vaccine. [More]
First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

Two dozen scientific papers published online simultaneously on Feb. 18, 2015 present the first comprehensive maps and analyses of the epigenomes of a wide array of human cell and tissue types. Epigenomes are patterns of chemical annotations to the genome that determine whether, how, and when genes are activated. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists identify new biomarker that could optimize chemotherapy response

UT Southwestern scientists identify new biomarker that could optimize chemotherapy response

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have identified a new biomarker that could help identify patients who are more likely to respond to certain chemotherapies. [More]
Findings may help doctors recommend appropriate treatments, improve patient outcomes

Findings may help doctors recommend appropriate treatments, improve patient outcomes

Like a car's front and back bumpers, your cell's chromosomes are capped by "telomeres" that protect this genetic material against deterioration. Still, after enough replications, a chromosome's telomeres break down and once they reach a certain point of degradation, the cell dies. This is one reason that cells are mortal: telomeres only last so long. That is, unless the enzyme telomerase builds new material onto the worn telomeres to reinforce these chromosomal "bumpers". Telomere repair can be a good thing, but in some cases it's not: overactive telomerase can lengthen telomeres until a cell becomes immortal…leading to cancer. [More]
Elsevier chosen to publish ISN's Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements journals

Elsevier chosen to publish ISN's Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements journals

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the International Society of Nephrology, the global medical society devoted to advancing kidney care worldwide, announced today that Elsevier will publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements, as of January 1, 2016. [More]
Trinity scientists reveal new marvel molecule that can block key process in inflammatory diseases

Trinity scientists reveal new marvel molecule that can block key process in inflammatory diseases

Scientists at Trinity College Dublin have uncovered a marvel molecule that blocks a key driver of inflammatory diseases. The finding could meet a major unmet clinical need by inspiring new non-invasive treatments for arthritis, multiple sclerosis and Muckle-Wells syndrome, among a myriad of other inflammatory diseases. [More]
UT Arlington chemist receives NIH's Academic Research Enhancement Award for protein research

UT Arlington chemist receives NIH's Academic Research Enhancement Award for protein research

A University of Texas at Arlington bio-analytical chemist exploring proteins, their structures and functions by using cutting-edge analytical instrumentation called mass spectrometry has received an Academic Research Enhancement Award from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Applying NMR to biological problems: an interview with Professor Arthur Palmer

Applying NMR to biological problems: an interview with Professor Arthur Palmer

Our current focus is on areas in protein folding, molecular recognition by proteins and also enzyme catalysis. NMR spin relaxation is one of the very powerful techniques in NMR for studying conformational dynamics in proteins or chemical kinetic processes. [More]
Elsevier to publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements

Elsevier to publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the International Society of Nephrology (ISN), the global medical society devoted to advancing kidney care worldwide, announced today that Elsevier will publish ISN's flagship journals, Kidney International and Kidney International Supplements, as of January 1, 2016. [More]
Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

Researchers report first evidence of Seoul hantavirus in wild rats in the Netherlands

In a paper just published in the peer reviewed journal Infection, Ecology & Epidemiology, researchers report discovering the first evidence of Seoul hantavirus (SEOV) in the wild rat population in the Netherlands. The discovery comes on the heels of similar ones in France, Belgium and the United Kingdom in recent years, and has some researchers concerned about the potential spread of the virus to humans. [More]
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