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Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

A new study published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America sheds new light on a well-known mechanism required for the immune response. Researchers at the IRCM, led by Tarik Möröy, PhD, identified a protein that controls the activity of the p53 tumour suppressor protein known as the "guardian of the genome". [More]
Promising anti-malarial compound uses novel mechanism to kill malaria parasite

Promising anti-malarial compound uses novel mechanism to kill malaria parasite

An international research collaborative has determined that a promising anti-malarial compound tricks the immune system to rapidly destroy red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite but leave healthy cells unharmed. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists led the study, which appears in the current online early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Scientists uphold mouse model of human disease, but pinpoint vital differences in gene expression

Scientists uphold mouse model of human disease, but pinpoint vital differences in gene expression

Scientists at Penn State College of Medicine, working alongside an international team of researchers, have produced the most complete encyclopedia of functional elements in the mouse genome to date and compared it to the human genome. [More]
Endocrine disrupting chemicals can alter thyroid levels in pregnant women, may affect fetus

Endocrine disrupting chemicals can alter thyroid levels in pregnant women, may affect fetus

A new study led by biologist R. Thomas Zoeller of the University of Massachusetts Amherst provides "the strongest evidence to date" that endocrine disrupting chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) found in flame retardant cloth, paint, adhesives and electrical transformers, can interfere with thyroid hormone action in pregnant women and may travel across the placenta to affect the fetus. [More]
Resveratrol in red wine may prevent cancer

Resveratrol in red wine may prevent cancer

Alcohol use is a major risk factor for head and neck cancer. But an article published in the November issue of the journal Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology shows that the chemical resveratrol found in grape skins and in red wine may prevent cancer as well. [More]
Advanced prebiotic Bimuno has ability to reduce anxiety

Advanced prebiotic Bimuno has ability to reduce anxiety

Clasado Biosciences Limited, the producers and suppliers of the second generation prebiotic Bimuno (B-GOS), a unique trans-galactooligosaccharide, and the Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, today announce the results of clinical research demonstrating for the first time that an advanced prebiotic (Bimuno) has the ability to reduce anxiety. [More]
Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Ten facts about Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Daniel Thomas will be conducting a ground-breaking study to determine if cognitive decline due to memory-destroying Alzheimer's disease can begin to be reversed in 90 days by combating the root causes using an innovative combination of diet, exercise, vitamin supplements, hormone therapy, and intravenous nutrition. [More]
Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Human stem cells made from adult donor cells remember their origin, say McMaster scientists

Scientists at McMaster University have discovered that human stem cells made from adult donor cells "remember" where they came from and that's what they prefer to become again. [More]
TDF wins William J. Gies Award for Outstanding Achievement

TDF wins William J. Gies Award for Outstanding Achievement

Tufts Dental Facilities Serving Individuals with Disabilities, a network of clinics that provides comprehensive oral health care to adults and children with intellectual, developmental, or acquired disabilities, has been announced as the winner of the William J. Gies Award for Outstanding Achievement by an Academic Dental Institution, part of the William J. Gies Awards for Vision, Innovation and Achievement. [More]
Monash University, 60P Australia partner to develop Fenretinide drug for dengue fever

Monash University, 60P Australia partner to develop Fenretinide drug for dengue fever

Monash University and 60P Australia Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of 60° Pharmaceuticals LLC, have announced today an exclusive partnering deal, with 60P obtaining rights to develop the drug Fenretinide for dengue fever. [More]
Kansas State University awarded patent for a series of synthetic compounds

Kansas State University awarded patent for a series of synthetic compounds

A patent has been issued for a series of synthetic compounds developed at Kansas State University that have applications for treating cancer and other diseases that affect cell communication. [More]
Component of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plant may thwart development of metabolic disorders

Component of Glycyrrhiza uralensis plant may thwart development of metabolic disorders

New research published in the December 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, shows that a component found in in the plant, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, may inhibit the development of metabolic disorders by stopping the activation of NLRP3, a protein involved in the disease process. [More]
Pivotal Therapeutics announces accomplishments, financial results for Q3 2014

Pivotal Therapeutics announces accomplishments, financial results for Q3 2014

Pivotal Therapeutics Inc., ("Pivotal" or the "Company"), a specialty pharmaceutical company with a focus on Omega-3 therapies for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and overall health, announced its accomplishments and financial results for the three months ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Certain mosquito species genetically better at transmitting malaria

Certain mosquito species genetically better at transmitting malaria

Certain species of mosquitoes are genetically better at transmitting malaria than even some of their close cousins, according to a multi-institutional team of researchers including Virginia Tech scientists. [More]
TET1 enzyme may be important target for cancer diagnostics, treatment

TET1 enzyme may be important target for cancer diagnostics, treatment

Mutations in the KRAS gene have long been known to cause cancer, and about one third of solid tumors have KRAS mutations or mutations in the KRAS pathway. KRAS promotes cancer formation not only by driving cell growth and division, but also by turning off protective tumor suppressor genes, which normally limit uncontrolled cell growth and cause damaged cells to self-destruct. [More]
Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

Eminent molecular cell biologist awarded GRC fellowship

The Gutenberg Research College of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has awarded the coveted GRC fellowship to Professor Krishnaraj Rajalingam. In the upcoming years, he will lead a research team at the Research Center for Immunotherapy at Mainz University. [More]
Dry powdered measles vaccine triggers no adverse side effects in early human testing

Dry powdered measles vaccine triggers no adverse side effects in early human testing

A measles vaccine made of fine dry powder and delivered with a puff of air triggered no adverse side effects in early human testing and it is likely effective, according to a paper to be published November 28 in the journal Vaccine. [More]
Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Choosing the best way to verify the quality and quantity of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation DNA

Porvair Sciences has published a new guide to help laboratories choose the best way to verify the quality and quantity of their Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) DNA. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two scientists from the University of Houston have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [More]