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New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. [More]
Two world-renowned scientists receive Poland-U.S. Science Award

Two world-renowned scientists receive Poland-U.S. Science Award

World-renowned scientists -- Prof. Mariusz Jaskólski of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, and Dr. Alexander Wlodawer of the National Cancer Institute, USA -- are the first winners of the Poland-U.S. Science Award granted jointly by the Foundation for Polish Science and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest scientific association. [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch for protein that causes HER2-positive breast cancer

Researchers identify molecular switch for protein that causes HER2-positive breast cancer

Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance. [More]
UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis investigators have settled a long-standing controversy surrounding the molecular basis of an inherited disorder that historically affected Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe but now also arises in other populations of Semitic descent, particularly families from Saudi Arabia. [More]
Discovery of molecular reset button for internal body clock could help treat different disorders

Discovery of molecular reset button for internal body clock could help treat different disorders

An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities, commonly associated with jet lag, shift work and exposure to light at night, as well as with neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and autism. [More]
New Tel Aviv University study may pave way for personalized bipolar disorder treatment

New Tel Aviv University study may pave way for personalized bipolar disorder treatment

Rapidly swinging from extremes of joy and energy to sadness, fatigue, and confusion, bipolar disorder (BD) patients feel desperate and largely alone in the world. And according to the National Institutes of Health, between 25-50 percent of the roughly 3% of Americans living with BD attempt suicide at least once. [More]
Winners of GSA poster awards announced at Fungal Genetics Conference

Winners of GSA poster awards announced at Fungal Genetics Conference

The Genetics Society of America and the community of fungal geneticists are pleased to announce the winners of the GSA poster awards at the 28th Fungal Genetics Conference, which took place in Pacific Grove, CA, March 17-22, 2015. [More]
Study explores artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

Study explores artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

According to the World Health Organization's 2014 World Malaria Report, there are an estimated 198 million cases of malaria worldwide with 3.3 billion people at risk for contracting the infection. Although the impact of malaria is still significant, the statistics reflect a considerable reduction in the global malaria burden. Since 2010, disease transmission has been reduced by 30 percent and mortality due to malaria has decreased by almost half. [More]
Lab-on-paper technique could help detect low quality antimalarial drugs

Lab-on-paper technique could help detect low quality antimalarial drugs

Access to high-quality medicine is a basic human right, but over four billion people live in countries where many medications are substandard or fake. Marya Lieberman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and Abigail Weaver a postdoctoral associate in the University's Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental and Earth Sciences took up the challenge of how people in developing countries could detect low quality antimalarial drugs without expensive equipment and without handling dangerous chemicals. [More]
New study sheds light on mechanism that affects AID enzyme

New study sheds light on mechanism that affects AID enzyme

A new study by immunology researchers at the IRCM led by Javier M. Di Noia, PhD, sheds light on a mechanism affecting AID, a crucial enzyme for the immune response. The scientific breakthrough, published in the latest issue of The Journal of Experimental Medicine, could eventually improve the way we treat the common flu, as well as lymphoma and leukemia. [More]
Designing AR Inhibitors Team wins AACR Team Science Award for developing prostate cancer treatment

Designing AR Inhibitors Team wins AACR Team Science Award for developing prostate cancer treatment

The American Association for Cancer Research will award the ninth annual AACR Team Science Award to the Designing Androgen Receptor (AR) Inhibitors Team from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the University of California, Los Angeles at the AACR Annual Meeting 2015, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. [More]
Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency can activate Hedgehog signaling pathway

Zinc deficiency - long associated with numerous diseases, e.g. autism, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and ovarian cancers - can lead to activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, a biomolecular pathway that plays essential roles in developing organisms and in diseases, according to new research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. [More]
Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA

Researchers use new gene editing tool to cut HIV DNA

The virus that causes AIDS is an efficient and crafty retrovirus. Once HIV inserts its DNA into the genome of its host cells, it has a long incubation period, and can remain dormant and hidden for years. [More]

New priority program set to develop next generation of optogenetic tools

Optogenetics is a new field of research that introduces light-sensitive proteins into cells in a genetically targeted manner, for example, to obtain information on signalling pathways and the function of neurons in a living organism. [More]
Researchers link loss of WAVE1 gene to lethal form of prostate cancer

Researchers link loss of WAVE1 gene to lethal form of prostate cancer

Researchers at Upstate Medical University and Harvard University have linked the loss of key gene, WAVE1, to a lethal form of prostate cancer, according to a study published in the journal Oncotarget. [More]
Simple dietary intervention can help reduce weight gain

Simple dietary intervention can help reduce weight gain

A University of Calgary study has found that rats fed a fibre supplement while on a high fat and high sugar diet show a much lower weight gain than those who did not eat the fibre. A team of researchers from the university's Cumming School of Medicine and the Faculty of Kinesiology says the study helps scientists better understand the mechanisms of weight control and energy balance. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio today revealed the molecular structure of the cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a widespread, highly contagious bacterium that infects the lungs. [More]
CXCR3 molecule is key mediator of melanoma metastasis, shows research

CXCR3 molecule is key mediator of melanoma metastasis, shows research

In a unique partnership demonstrating excellence in "team science," Dartmouth investigators from Norris Cotton Cancer Center identified a role for the molecule CXCR3 (widely known to regulate the migration of immune cells) as a key mediator of melanoma metastasis. [More]
Study reveals how cell's protein quality control mechanism helps combat neurodegenerative diseases

Study reveals how cell's protein quality control mechanism helps combat neurodegenerative diseases

A molecular pathway known to suppress tumors appears to also be a major player in clearing cells of damaged proteins implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and certain types of dementia, new research in roundworms and human cells suggests. [More]
Novel molecule inhibits cancer-causing transcription factors

Novel molecule inhibits cancer-causing transcription factors

A novel molecule designed by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Virginia inhibits progression of a hard-to-treat form of recurring acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in patient tissue. [More]
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