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Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

A Canadian research team at the IRCM in Montreal, led by molecular virologist Eric A. Cohen, PhD, made a significant discovery on how HIV escapes the body's antiviral responses. The team uncovered how an HIV viral protein known as Vpu tricks the immune system by using its own regulatory process to evade the host's first line of defence. [More]
New drug DSM265 shows potential to cure, prevent malaria

New drug DSM265 shows potential to cure, prevent malaria

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and in Australia have shown that a drug currently in testing shows potential to cure malaria in a single dose and offers promise as a preventive treatment as well. [More]
University of Bristol-led study could provide new target for treating neurological disorders

University of Bristol-led study could provide new target for treating neurological disorders

Findings, published today [15 Jul] in Nature Communications, reveal the extent a mutation associated with autism and epilepsy plays in impairing a biochemical process in the brain. The study, led by University of Bristol researchers, could provide a new target for treating neurological disorders. [More]
Two chemical compounds effectively inhibit growth of brain cancer cells and breast tumors

Two chemical compounds effectively inhibit growth of brain cancer cells and breast tumors

Researchers have discovered two chemical compounds that effectively stop the growth of brain cancer cells and breast tumors, opening the way for potential new drugs to be developed. [More]
Researchers identify DPP9 enzyme that can regulate growth, movement of liver cancer cells

Researchers identify DPP9 enzyme that can regulate growth, movement of liver cancer cells

Researchers at the Centenary Institute in Sydney have uncovered new information about an enzyme called DPP9 that they believe to be a potential therapeutic target for limiting tumour growth and its ability to spread to and in the liver. [More]
Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Chunying Li, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has secured his first R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role and mechanism of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in regulating new blood vessel formation, the so-called angiogenesis. [More]
New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

New study reveals highly promising approach to coating tissue engineered constructs

A new study showing the ability to apply a thin coating of viable respiratory epithelial cells to tissue engineered constructs using a commercially available spray device is especially promising for therapeutic approaches in development to repair or replace challenging structures such as trachea or bronchi. [More]
Scientists gain insights into dynamic remodeling of tissue during lung repair

Scientists gain insights into dynamic remodeling of tissue during lung repair

Our lungs are permanently exposed to harmful environmental factors that can damage or even destroy their cells. In a specific regenerative process these injured cells must be replaced as soon as possible. In collaboration with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now, for the first time, gained detailed insights into the dynamic remodeling of the tissue during lung repair. [More]
New UW-Madison study links two unrelated cancer treatments

New UW-Madison study links two unrelated cancer treatments

A new study at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has linked two seemingly unrelated cancer treatments that are both now being tested in clinical trials. [More]
Study finds gene linked to age-related obesity, diabetes

Study finds gene linked to age-related obesity, diabetes

Practically everyone gets fatter as they get older, but some people can blame their genes for the extra padding. Researchers have shown that two different mutations in a gene called ankyrin-B cause cells to suck up glucose faster than normal, fattening them up and eventually triggering the type of diabetes linked to obesity. [More]
New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 - the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers - is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth. [More]
UM researchers discover new gene behind neurodegenerative conditions

UM researchers discover new gene behind neurodegenerative conditions

Researchers at the University of Miami have discovered and characterized a previously unknown disease gene linked to the degeneration of optic and peripheral nerve fibers. The study titled "Mutations in SLC25A46, encoding a UGO1-like protein, cause an optic atrophy spectrum disorder" is published in the journal Nature Genetics. [More]
Ultrasound treatment speeds up skin healing among diabetics and the elderly

Ultrasound treatment speeds up skin healing among diabetics and the elderly

Healing times for skin ulcers and bedsores can be reduced by a third with the use of low-intensity ultrasound, scientists from the University of Sheffield and University of Bristol have found. [More]
Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

The Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery (JHDD) program, created with the mission of identifying novel drug targets arising from Johns Hopkins faculty research and translating them into new therapeutics, and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague) have entered into a five-year drug discovery research agreement to develop small-molecule and peptide drugs for a range of therapeutic areas including neurological diseases, cancer and gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Defects in mitochondria play key role in transition of normal cells to cancerous cells

Cancer cells defy the rules by which normal cells abide. They can divide without cease, invade distant tissues and consume glucose at abnormal rates. [More]
NSU cancer researcher selected for prestigious J. William Fulbright award

NSU cancer researcher selected for prestigious J. William Fulbright award

Nova Southeastern University cancer researcher Appu Rathinavelu, Ph.D., was selected for a prestigious J. William Fulbright award to conduct cancer research and training in India. Dr. Rathinavelu is associate dean for institutional planning and development at NSU's College of Pharmacy and executive director of NSU's Rumbaugh-Goodwin Institute for Cancer Research. [More]
MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

Technology rapidly is advancing the study of genetics and the search for causes of major diseases. Analysis of genomic sequences that once took days or months now can be performed in a matter of hours. Yet, for most genetic scientists, the lack of access to computer servers and programs capable of quickly handling vast amounts of data can hinder genetic advancements. [More]
UT Arlington, UNTHSC scientists to build prototype for implantable shunt flow monitoring system

UT Arlington, UNTHSC scientists to build prototype for implantable shunt flow monitoring system

Scientists from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of North Texas Health Science Center are building a prototype for an implantable in-line shunt flow monitoring system that would deliver both on-demand and continuous readings of hydrocephalus. [More]
New public guide addresses unrealistic expectations of screening tests

New public guide addresses unrealistic expectations of screening tests

Misconceptions about how screening works, its limitations and possible harms are still being perpetuated by media stories and high profile cases, such as Angelina Jolie's double mastectomy and emotive tabloid case studies of women under 25 dying from cervical cancer. [More]
Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

Study sheds light on how dengue virus adapts, causes outbreaks as it travels

A researcher from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston is an integral member of a collaborative group that is the first to explain the mechanisms that the Dengue virus has developed to optimize its ability to cause outbreaks as it travels across the globe to new places and revisits old ones. [More]
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