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A biomarker is a biological molecule found in blood, other body fluids, or tissues that is a sign of a normal or abnormal process, or of a condition or disease. A biomarker may be used to see how well the body responds to a treatment for a disease or condition. Also called molecular marker and signature molecule.
Scientists use Regeneration Intelligence to assess perturbation status of many signaling pathways

Scientists use Regeneration Intelligence to assess perturbation status of many signaling pathways

Insilico Medicine, Inc in collaboration with scientists from Atlas Regeneration, Inc, Vision Genomics, Inc and Howard University published two research papers on fibrosis in the lung and liver and fibrotic signatures in glaucoma. [More]
Roche announces FDA approval of  new VENTANA PD-L1 assay

Roche announces FDA approval of new VENTANA PD-L1 assay

Roche today announced approval of the VENTANA PD-L1 (SP142) Assay by the US Food and Drug Administration as a complementary diagnostic to provide PD-L1 status on patients who are considering treatment with the FDA approved Roche immunotherapy TECENTRIQ™ (atezolizumab) for metastatic urothelial cancer (mUC). [More]
Research could help clinicians identify patients who may benefit from targeted therapy for liver cancer

Research could help clinicians identify patients who may benefit from targeted therapy for liver cancer

New research from Roswell Park Cancer Institute offers clinicians treating patients with advanced liver cancer a way of determining which patients may benefit most from the targeted therapy sorafenib. [More]
CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

CD4/CD8 ratio biomarker could help identify HIV-infected individuals at risk for heart disease

The ratio of CD4 to CD8 T cells in the blood-a marker of immune system health and associated with mortality risk in the general population-is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease in HIV-infected patients, according to a new study published in AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol may be clinically beneficial to people with Alzheimer's disease

Resveratrol, given to Alzheimer's patients, appears to restore the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, reducing the ability of harmful immune molecules secreted by immune cells to infiltrate from the body into brain tissues, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. [More]
Levels of peptide hormone adropin linked to carbohydrate intake

Levels of peptide hormone adropin linked to carbohydrate intake

In research featured in the August edition of Obesity, Saint Louis University investigator Andrew Butler, Ph.D., and his team report that levels of the peptide hormone adropin vary based on carbohydrate consumption and appear to be linked to lipid metabolism. [More]
Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Waterloo researchers unveil new screening tool and data at 2016 AAIC

Two studies involving University of Waterloo researchers presented this week at the 2016 Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC) in Toronto highlight a new diagnostic tool that can identify Alzheimer's disease long before the onset of symptoms as well as the increasing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in Ontario. [More]
Liquid biopsies hold potential for detecting NSCLC EGFR mutations, predicting cancer recurrence

Liquid biopsies hold potential for detecting NSCLC EGFR mutations, predicting cancer recurrence

Three manuscripts published in the recent issue of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the official journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, explored the versatility of liquid biopsies by identifying EGFR mutations using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in urine and plasma and examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in plasma to predict the risk of lung cancer recurrence after surgical resection. [More]
Menopause and insomnia could make women age faster

Menopause and insomnia could make women age faster

Two UCLA studies reveal that menopause--and the insomnia that often accompanies it -- make women age faster. [More]
Free online World Sepsis Congress sponsored by Radiometer

Free online World Sepsis Congress sponsored by Radiometer

Radiometer is proud to announce that it is sponsoring the 1st World Sepsis Congress, from the 8th to the 9th of September 2016. Organized by the Global Sepsis Alliance, this free online event will give participants the chance to hear experts from around the world discuss the challenges and opportunities in the battle against this life-threatening illness. [More]
Identifying new pathway of EZH2 gene may lead to targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancer

Identifying new pathway of EZH2 gene may lead to targeted therapies for aggressive breast cancer

Scientists from A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore and the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore came together to understand how EZH2, a cancer-promoting gene which is known to be involved in many types of cancers, is activated in breast cancer and lymphomas. [More]
Researchers detect high levels of arsenic, chromium and kidney injury biomarker in children of Mexico

Researchers detect high levels of arsenic, chromium and kidney injury biomarker in children of Mexico

Water supply contamination has become a global issue, affecting communities in both the United States and around the world. [More]
JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

JAD announces recipient of 2016 Alzheimer Award

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is pleased to announce that Mark W. Bondi, PhD, ABPP/CN, Professor of Psychiatry at UC San Diego and Director of the Neuropsychological Assessment Unit at the VA San Diego Healthcare System, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2016 Alzheimer Award presented by the journal in recognition of his outstanding work on the development of a novel and promising method of staging preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on number of abnormal biomarkers that is predictive of progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD. [More]
Expanding the potential of existing cancer therapies: an interview with Dr Mark Rutstein

Expanding the potential of existing cancer therapies: an interview with Dr Mark Rutstein

Cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide, and the global cancer burden is expected to increase by 70 percent over the next two decades. [More]
Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD

Aelan's researchers develop novel epigenetic biomarker for diagnosis of AD

Aelan Cell Technologies today announced the development of a novel epigenetic biomarker. An early human clinical feasibility study has indicated that serological tests using the biomarker alongside other proprietary components developed by Aelan's researchers could potentially help physicians diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

Leukemia drug increases brain dopamine, lowers toxic proteins linked to Parkinson's or dementia

A small phase I study provides molecular evidence that an FDA-approved drug for leukemia significantly increased brain dopamine and reduced toxic proteins linked to disease progression in patients with Parkinson's disease or dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
Gut bacteria can help predict susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

Gut bacteria can help predict susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis

The bacteria in your gut do more than break down your food. They also can predict susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis, suggests Veena Taneja, Ph.D., an immunologist at Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine. Dr. Taneja recently published two studies — one in Genome Medicine and one in Arthritis and Rheumatology — connecting the dots between gut microbiota and rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Study identifies new blood markers to accurately diagnose Gulf War Illness

Based on a study of 85 Gulf War veterans, Veterans Affairs researchers in Minneapolis have developed a tentative panel of blood markers they say can verify a diagnosis of Gulf War Illness with 90 percent accuracy. [More]
JAX researchers find precise, reliable way to identify leukemia cells of origin

JAX researchers find precise, reliable way to identify leukemia cells of origin

Every cancer starts with a single cell, and Jackson Laboratory researchers have found a precise and reliable way -- whole-genome profiling of open chromatin -- to identify the kind of cell that leads to a given case of leukemia, a valuable key to cancer prognosis and outcome. [More]
I-SPY2 research initiative employs exciting new model for testing breast cancer drugs

I-SPY2 research initiative employs exciting new model for testing breast cancer drugs

In a new paradigm of breast cancer research, physicians are fast-tracking promising new experimental drugs for further study, while immediately dropping drugs and drug combinations that don't work. [More]
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