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A biomarker is a biological molecule found in blood, other body fluids, or tissues that is a sign of a normal or abnormal process, or of a condition or disease. A biomarker may be used to see how well the body responds to a treatment for a disease or condition. Also called molecular marker and signature molecule.
Michigan researchers use 'kidney on a chip' device to measure effect of drug doses on kidney cells

Michigan researchers use 'kidney on a chip' device to measure effect of drug doses on kidney cells

University of Michigan researchers have used a "kidney on a chip" device to mimic the flow of medication through human kidneys and measure its effect on kidney cells. [More]
Scientists detect blood biomarker that may help in early diagnosis of children with ASD

Scientists detect blood biomarker that may help in early diagnosis of children with ASD

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a blood biomarker that may aid in earlier diagnosis of children with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD. [More]
New study links cathepsin S protein to tear secretion in Sjogren's syndrome patients

New study links cathepsin S protein to tear secretion in Sjogren's syndrome patients

The autoimmune disorder Sjogren's syndrome is often overlooked or misdiagnosed because the symptoms are similar to other conditions. Its characteristic symptoms are dry eyes and dry mouth, and reduced tear production is used as part of the diagnosis. [More]
Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Cerebellar not cerebral atrophy predicts poor anti-NMDAR encephalitis outcome

Diffuse cerebral atrophy in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis does not necessarily mean irreversible brain damage, whereas progressive cerebellar atrophy may indicate a poor long-term prognosis, researchers report. [More]
TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

TJP1 protein could help determine multiple myeloma patients who may best benefit from proteasome inhibitors

A gene known as TJP1 (tight junction protein 1) could help determine which multiple myeloma patients would best benefit from proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib, as well as combination approaches to enhance proteasome inhibitor sensitivity, according to a study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Understanding how individuals respond to aspirin

Researchers have learned new information about how different people respond to aspirin, a globally prescribed drug in cardioprotection. The research team, led by scientists at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom and including representatives from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado, identified more than 5,600 lipids — or fats — in blood platelets and gained new insights into how these cells respond to aspirin. [More]
Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Cardiac troponin is a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for myocardial injury but concentrations in the blood rise over several hours after the onset of an acute myocardial infarction. [More]
Bonn researchers identify new technique to measure activity of brown fat cells

Bonn researchers identify new technique to measure activity of brown fat cells

Brown fat cells can burn fat to generate heat. University of Bonn researchers have discovered a new method to measure the activity of brown fat cells in humans and mice. The researchers showed that microRNA-92a can be used as an indirect measure for the activity of energy consuming brown fat cells. They showed that a small blood sample was sufficient. Results were published in "Nature Communications," a well-known scientific journal. [More]
Protea signs license agreement with Yale to develop new technology for detecting malignant melanoma

Protea signs license agreement with Yale to develop new technology for detecting malignant melanoma

Protea Biosciences Group, Inc. announced today that it had entered into an exclusive license agreement with Yale University for new technology to improve the differential diagnosis of malignant melanoma. [More]
First-ever vaccine to combat Leishmaniasis under development

First-ever vaccine to combat Leishmaniasis under development

As scientists scramble to get a Zika virus vaccine into human trials by the end of the summer, a team of researchers is working on the first-ever vaccine to prevent another insect-borne disease - Leishmaniasis - from gaining a similar foothold in the Americas. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may not reduce colorectal cancer risk

Cholesterol-lowering drugs may not reduce colorectal cancer risk

Long-term use of the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins does not appear to decrease a patient's risk of colorectal cancer, suggests a new, large case-control study from Penn Medicine researchers published this week in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Decrease in serum zinc levels may cause inflammation among HIV positive individuals

Decrease in serum zinc levels may cause inflammation among HIV positive individuals

In a new study, University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers Krishna Poudel and colleagues report that zinc deficiency may contribute to chronic inflammation among HIV-positive individuals. Theirs is believed to be the first investigation to explore the association between serum zinc levels and inflammation among people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while taking their anti-retroviral therapy (ART) into account. [More]
Modulation of estrobolome may help lower breast cancer risk

Modulation of estrobolome may help lower breast cancer risk

Investigating disparities in the composition of the estrobolome, the gut bacterial genes capable of metabolizing estrogens in both healthy individuals and in women diagnosed with estrogen-driven breast cancer may lead to the development of microbiome-based biomarkers that could help mitigate the risk of certain cancers, according to a review paper published April 22 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. [More]
FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

FAU's clinical trial to evaluate efficacy of RVT-101 tablet for Lewy body dementia

Florida Atlantic University's Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine is spearheading the South Florida site for the first U.S. clinical trial for Lewy body dementia (LBD), the second-most common dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The HEADWAY-DLB is a phase 2b multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate an investigational medicine, RVT-101, for dementia with Lewy bodies. [More]
Researchers use highly accurate biomarker to measure aging in HIV infected patients

Researchers use highly accurate biomarker to measure aging in HIV infected patients

Thanks to combination antiretroviral therapies, many people with HIV can expect to live decades after being infected. Yet doctors have observed these patients often show signs of premature aging. [More]
Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

Non-invasive test to diagnose EoE could replace need for repeated endoscopy

A non-invasive test to diagnose and monitor an inflammatory disease that injures the esophagus - called eosinophilic esophagitis or EoE - would replace the need for repeated endoscopy for a growing number of children and adults with this relatively new condition. [More]
PerkinElmer’s Phenoptics solution has potential to predict biomarker for anti-PD1 therapies for Merkel cell carcinoma

PerkinElmer’s Phenoptics solution has potential to predict biomarker for anti-PD1 therapies for Merkel cell carcinoma

PerkinElmer, Inc., a global leader focused on improving the health and safety of people and the environment, today announced that its Phenoptics™ quantitative pathology research system was an important component in skin cancer research published online in the April 19 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Pre-TKI cytokine profiling predicts CP-CML outcome

Pre-TKI cytokine profiling predicts CP-CML outcome

Measuring levels of transforming growth factor-α and interleukin-6 may help identify patients with newly diagnosed chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukaemia at risk of a poor outcome from tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, research suggests. [More]
CWRU scientists develop computational tools to quantify effects of prostate cancer laser ablation

CWRU scientists develop computational tools to quantify effects of prostate cancer laser ablation

Prostate cancers are either low-grade, low-risk forms that may be monitored but otherwise untreated. Or they're serious enough to require surgery and radiation. [More]
Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

Immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shrinks tumors in patients with Merkel cell carcinoma

In a clinical trial of the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, half of 25 patients with a rare type of virus-linked skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma experienced substantial tumor shrinkage lasting nearly three times as long, on average, than with conventional chemotherapy. [More]
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