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New mouse model reveals underlying brain changes linked to autism's social, learning problems

New mouse model reveals underlying brain changes linked to autism's social, learning problems

A new mouse model of a genetically-linked type of autism reveals more about the role of genes in the disorder and the underlying brain changes associated with autism's social and learning problems. [More]
Researchers agree to test new stem cell gene therapy for Sanfilippo disease in human trial

Researchers agree to test new stem cell gene therapy for Sanfilippo disease in human trial

Scientists in Manchester, who have developed a stem cell gene therapy to reverse a fatal childhood illness, have agreed to work with a new therapeutics company to test it in a human trial. [More]
Patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines may improve overall survival of melanoma patients

Patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines may improve overall survival of melanoma patients

Two patients with melanoma that had spread to the liver survived for at least 8.5 and 12 years after resection of the hepatic tumor and treatment with patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines. [More]
Simultaneous DNA, RNA and protein analysis to enhance cancer immunology studies: an interview with Dr Joseph Beechem

Simultaneous DNA, RNA and protein analysis to enhance cancer immunology studies: an interview with Dr Joseph Beechem

Cancer immunology is all about how your immune cells are going to fight and kill your tumor cells. If you look at the pure genetic code of a T-cell that's going to kill your tumor compared to the same cell that has been “put-to-sleep” (by the tumor), the pure genetic DNA content of those two cells are identical. [More]
Researchers find way to selectively deliver drugs to placenta without harming fetus

Researchers find way to selectively deliver drugs to placenta without harming fetus

Nearly 10 percent of babies born in the United States are born premature, according to the March of Dimes. The underlying cause of many complications during pregnancy is often a poorly functioning placenta, the organ that nourishes and maintains the fetus. [More]
Unique attributes of zebrafish may help study human blood disorders

Unique attributes of zebrafish may help study human blood disorders

Genetic regulation of the various types of blood cells in zebrafish and humans is highly similar, making it relatively easy and cost-effective to perform genetic, chemical, imaging and other molecular studies on this invaluable model organism to study normal hematopoetic development in humans as well as blood disorders and malignancies, as described in a Review article in Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Unlocking cellular trap door may help in finding cures for many diseases

Unlocking cellular trap door may help in finding cures for many diseases

A team of researchers who two years ago announced a "Trojan horse" method of entering a cell without harming it have now found, in effect, the lock to the cellular "trap door." [More]
Globin gene transfer to treat beta-thalassemias shows promise in first clinical trial

Globin gene transfer to treat beta-thalassemias shows promise in first clinical trial

Promising results from the first clinical trials of globin gene transfer to treat beta-thalassemias-inherited forms of anemia-have eliminated the need for blood transfusions in some individuals. [More]
Use of cosmetics during pregnancy can have adverse effects on newborn’s health

Use of cosmetics during pregnancy can have adverse effects on newborn’s health

A study led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center's School of Public Health presents evidence linking personal care products used during pregnancy to adverse reproductive effects in newborns. [More]
Simple 20-second upper arm extension test can identify frailty in older adults

Simple 20-second upper arm extension test can identify frailty in older adults

A simple arm test that employs a novel wearable technology can rapidly and accurately identify physiological frailty in older adults, according to study results published online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
BioTek to present new technologies for cell-based applications at analytica 2016

BioTek to present new technologies for cell-based applications at analytica 2016

BioTek will present two opportunities for researchers to learn about new instruments and approaches to simplify their workflow at analytica 2016, the 25th International Trade Fair for Laboratory Technology, Analysis, Biotechnology and analytica conference. [More]
Study reveals long-term health-related quality of life in bariatric surgery patients

Study reveals long-term health-related quality of life in bariatric surgery patients

Significant improvement in health-related quality of life was reported by patients 12-14 years after undergoing an uncommon form of bariatric surgery at one U.S. medical center. Follow-up of the 27 patients who underwent biliary pancreatic diversion surgery with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) by the same surgeon is described in an article in Bariatric Surgical Practice and Patient Care, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free for download until June 2, 2016. [More]
Brain receptor that initiates adolescent synaptic pruning appears to go awry in autism, schizophrenia

Brain receptor that initiates adolescent synaptic pruning appears to go awry in autism, schizophrenia

Research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center has identified a brain receptor that appears to initiate adolescent synaptic pruning, a process believed necessary for learning, but one that appears to go awry in both autism and schizophrenia. [More]
Study provides new avenues for improving quality, stability of embryonic stem cells

Study provides new avenues for improving quality, stability of embryonic stem cells

Research led by the Babraham Institute with collaborators in the UK, Canada and Japan has revealed a new understanding of how an open genome structure supports the long-term and unrestricted developmental potential in embryonic stem cells. This insight provides new avenues for improving the quality and stability of embryonic stem cells - an essential requirement to fulfil their promise in regenerative medicine. [More]
Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

African American women with ovarian cancer are more likely to die from the disease than are White women and they are also much more likely to be obese. These factors may be linked by the new finding that excess abdominal fat in overweight and obese women could interfere with the detection of early symptoms of ovarian cancer, as presented in a study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

Gut bacteria linked to risk of bloodstream infections after chemotherapy

A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota and Nantes University Hospital in France shows that the bacteria in people's gut may predict their risk of life-threatening blood infections following high-dose chemotherapy. [More]
Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

Black raspberry intake can lower key measure of arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome

A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Medicinal Food website until May 28, 2016. [More]
Modernization of screening methods in sperm banks could protect future children from highly heritable diseases

Modernization of screening methods in sperm banks could protect future children from highly heritable diseases

U.S. sperm banks perform genetic testing to screen for and disqualify carriers of a limited number of recessive disease mutations, but more comprehensive and affordable DNA-based screening methods are now available that can detect many more disease-causing genetic variations. [More]
Researchers outline strategy to address vital measurement challenges in allergen analysis

Researchers outline strategy to address vital measurement challenges in allergen analysis

A Manchester scientist has contributed to a review of allergen analysis that aims to improve the situation for those living with food allergies - preventing food fraud and protecting consumers. [More]
University of Leicester-led researchers solve 3D structure of NuRD complex that plays role in cancer

University of Leicester-led researchers solve 3D structure of NuRD complex that plays role in cancer

A team of researchers led by the University of Leicester has shed new light on how the regulation machinery that controls gene expression works by characterising a complex known as the NuRD complex. [More]
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