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New treatment may destroy HIV's last refuge

New treatment may destroy HIV's last refuge

UK scientists may have found a way to destroy HIV's last refuge. A study by Oxford University has confirmed that a treatment developed by a British company can remove the virus in its chosen hiding place, in laboratory conditions, offering hope of a viable treatment. [More]
Researchers develop new detection systems for genotyping DNA and RNA with naked eye

Researchers develop new detection systems for genotyping DNA and RNA with naked eye

DNA polymerases are the “Xerox machines” that replicate our DNA. They must work with great precision to keep errors from creeping into our genes. [More]
Chiral separation enhanced with flexible evaporator

Chiral separation enhanced with flexible evaporator

The Genevac Rocket™ Synergy Evaporator is a powerful tool proven to accelerate traditionally difficult and time consuming chiral separation protocols [More]
Factors linked to sexual victimization risk among college students

Factors linked to sexual victimization risk among college students

Sexual victimization on college campuses may be more or less likely depending on institutional characteristics of the school such as size, type (public or private), sex ratio, selectivity, and percentage of students involved in Greek life (fraternities and sororities). [More]
Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire plc announces that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Xiidra (lifitegrast ophthalmic solution) 5%, a twice-daily eye drop solution indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adult patients. [More]
Recellularized colon model helps identify cancer driver genes involved in CRC progression

Recellularized colon model helps identify cancer driver genes involved in CRC progression

Genetic mutations are a major cause of cancer, and tracking the role of each gene in cancer pathogenesis has long been an important tool in the fight against a disease that is expected to kill more than 1.6 million people this year. [More]
Diversity of gut bacteria may affect brain health

Diversity of gut bacteria may affect brain health

The surprising and potentially wide-ranging effects that the levels and diversity of bacteria living in the gut have on overall human health, inflammation, and specifically brain health are the focus of a provocative interview with Dr. David Perlmutter in Alternative and Complementary Therapies, a journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
New study suggests potential role for gut microbiota in diabetes remission after bypass surgery

New study suggests potential role for gut microbiota in diabetes remission after bypass surgery

Studies have shown that bariatric surgery can lead to remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in rodents and humans, but this beneficial effect cannot be explained solely by weight loss. [More]
Scientists develop new online open-access data tool to improve drug safety

Scientists develop new online open-access data tool to improve drug safety

A new online open-access database has been developed by scientists to allow the clinical responses of more than 5 million patients to all FDA-approved drugs to be used to identify unexpected clinical harm, benefits and alternative treatment choices for individual patients, according to a study appearing July 8 in Nature Biotechnology. [More]
Review examines role of gut microbes in development, progression of MS

Review examines role of gut microbes in development, progression of MS

An increasing number of clinical studies are pointing to a link between the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the composition of microbes in the human gut, sparking new research on the gut microbiome as a potential target for MS treatment and prevention. [More]
Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and University of Melbourne report they have used a genetic test that spots bits of cancer-related DNA circulating in the blood to accurately predict the likelihood of the disease's return in some — but not all — of a small group of patients with early-stage colon cancer. [More]
European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

Amgen has announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved a variation to the marketing authorization for Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) to include use in combination with dexamethasone alone for adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The extended indication marks the second approval for Kyprolis by the EC in less than a year. [More]
Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today preliminary results from its ongoing Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) studies with patisiran and revusiran, both investigational RNAi therapeutics targeting transthyretin (TTR) for the treatment of hereditary TTR-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR amyloidosis). [More]
Mice study shows how multiple malaria infections lead to increased health risks

Mice study shows how multiple malaria infections lead to increased health risks

Scientists have discovered why infections with two types of malaria parasite lead to greater health risks - because one species helps the other to thrive. [More]
VHA implements system-wide changes for improving LGBT veteran healthcare

VHA implements system-wide changes for improving LGBT veteran healthcare

The U.S. Veterans Health Administration, which is likely the largest provider of LGBT healthcare in the world, is implementing various system-wide changes aimed at improving LGBT care, including transgender e-consultations to aid interdisciplinary providers and the addition of a self-identified gender identity field to all veteran record systems. [More]
CDC invests in Donator’s unique heat stabilization technology

CDC invests in Donator’s unique heat stabilization technology

Denator, the Swedish-based biotechnology company specialized in biological sample preparation technologies announced today that the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, had made a major purchase of its proprietary heat stabilization technology Stabilizor T1™. [More]
MIT engineers develop new way to visualize RNA molecules in higher resolution

MIT engineers develop new way to visualize RNA molecules in higher resolution

Cells contain thousands of messenger RNA molecules, which carry copies of DNA's genetic instructions to the rest of the cell. MIT engineers have now developed a way to visualize these molecules in higher resolution than previously possible in intact tissues, allowing researchers to precisely map the location of RNA throughout cells. [More]
New test strip can rapidly, cost-effectively detect disease pathogens

New test strip can rapidly, cost-effectively detect disease pathogens

At present, bacteria, fungi or viruses can generally only be detected with certainty by way of elaborate laboratory tests or animal experiments. The food and pharmaceutical industries would like to have faster tests to check their products. [More]
Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Researchers design E. coli-based transport capsule to help fight pneumococcal disease

Most people recoil at the thought of ingesting E. coli. But what if the headline-grabbing bacteria could be used to fight disease? [More]
New supplement could help reduce urge to consume high-calorie foods

New supplement could help reduce urge to consume high-calorie foods

Eating a type of powdered food supplement, based on a molecule produced by bacteria in the gut, reduces cravings for high-calorie foods such as chocolate, cake and pizza, a new study suggests. [More]
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