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In North America, bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and in the top ten for women. In the United States, approximately 70,000 patients are newly diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. In addition, the cancers of many previously-diagnosed patients remain unresolved, sometimes leading to cystectomy (bladder removal) or death. Approximately 70% bladder cancer patients have the non-muscle-invasive form of bladder cancer at diagnosis.
Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Prognostic factor could help identify tumor recurrence after surgery for prostate cancer

Slightly more than 10% of all patients who undergo successful surgery for prostate cancer have an elevated risk of tumor recurrence afterwards - especially as metastases. [More]
Olive oil-based emulsion shows promise for mycobacterial treatment of bladder cancer

Olive oil-based emulsion shows promise for mycobacterial treatment of bladder cancer

Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona with the collaboration of the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia, led by the professor of the UAB Department of Genetics and Microbiology Esther Julián, announced one year ago that the cells of the Mycobacterium brumae offer an improved alternative to current bladder cancer treatments such as BCG (an immunotherapy based on the Mycobacterium bovis), which can cause infections. [More]
Study provides valuable insight into biology of tumours in early stages of cancer

Study provides valuable insight into biology of tumours in early stages of cancer

Bladder cancer is a frequent disease affecting approximately 1,900 persons in Denmark annually. A high number of these patients only have superficial tumours in the bladder when the disease is diagnosed. [More]
New analytical technology could improve cancer treatment by establishing ideal dosing regimens

New analytical technology could improve cancer treatment by establishing ideal dosing regimens

University of Oklahoma researchers will apply a new analytical technology that could ultimately provide a powerful tool for improved treatment of cancer patients in Oklahoma and beyond. Using mass spectrometry, an analytical instrument for sensitive detection and accurate [More]
Whole-exome sequencing can help characterize genetic alterations for commonly used bladder cancer cell lines

Whole-exome sequencing can help characterize genetic alterations for commonly used bladder cancer cell lines

Much of basic cancer research is based on studies with cultured cancer cells. However, the usefulness of these studies greatly depends on how accurately these cancer cells grown in a dish represent human tumors. [More]
NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

A recent pilot study reported in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that sodium fluoride (Na-F-18) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (NaF-PET/CT) accurately detects bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and follow-up scans over time correlate clearly with clinical outcomes and patient survival. [More]
Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Researchers at the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute discovered something simple and inexpensive to reduce neuropathy in hands and feet due to chemotherapy--exercise. [More]
Novel drug atezolizumab harnesses immune system to shrink tumors in advanced bladder cancer

Novel drug atezolizumab harnesses immune system to shrink tumors in advanced bladder cancer

A new drug that harnesses the immune system to attack tumors is highly effective against advanced bladder cancer, according to the results of an international clinical trial to be presented June 5 at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology. [More]
Nivolumab drug shows better response rate in metastatic bladder cancer patients

Nivolumab drug shows better response rate in metastatic bladder cancer patients

The immune checkpoint blockade drug nivolumab reduced tumor burden in 24.4 percent of patients with metastatic bladder cancer, regardless of whether their tumors had a biomarker related to the drug's target, according to clinical trial results from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, will provide an update on their extensive oncology pipeline at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, USA, on 3-7 June 2016. [More]
Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) to treat the most common type of bladder cancer, called urothelial carcinoma. This is the first product in its class (PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors) approved to treat this type of cancer. [More]
Ipsen partners with IMCB to advance understanding and research of Botulinum Neurotoxin Biology

Ipsen partners with IMCB to advance understanding and research of Botulinum Neurotoxin Biology

Ipsen S.A., a global specialty-driven pharmaceutical company, and the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), a research institute under the aegis of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, today announced the signature of a research partnership to study the intracellular trafficking of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) within neurons. [More]
Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University. [More]
NBI-facilitated bladder tumour surgery can lower risk of cancer recurrence

NBI-facilitated bladder tumour surgery can lower risk of cancer recurrence

Research into bladder tumour surgery has found that using narrow band imaging can significantly reduce the risk of disease recurrence. [More]
Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Good nutrition and regular exercise combined are an effective way to reduce the risk of cancer and to prevent its recurrence. "This has been proven over and over," said Carol DeNysschen, associate professor and chair of the Health, Nutrition, and Dietetics Department at Buffalo State. "If we could only motivate people to eat better and move more, we'd have so much less chronic disease." [More]
Discovery of shared biological properties among DNA variants may help identify new therapeutic targets

Discovery of shared biological properties among DNA variants may help identify new therapeutic targets

The discovery of shared biological properties among independent variants of DNA sequences offers the opportunity to broaden understanding of the biological basis of disease and identify new therapeutic targets, according to a collaboration between the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona Health Sciences, and Vanderbilt University. The group published their findings this month in npj Genomic Medicine. [More]
Investigators explore possible causes for cancer recurrence after LRC

Investigators explore possible causes for cancer recurrence after LRC

Although laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continue to grow in popularity and are successful in the treatment of bladder cancer, they are still considered experimental approaches. Using data collected by the Section of Uro-Technology of the European Association of Urology (ESUT), a team of researchers found that about 5% of patients experienced unexpected relapses of cancer after LRC, even with favorable pathology. [More]
Radiotherapy needs likely to increase in all European countries by 2025

Radiotherapy needs likely to increase in all European countries by 2025

The demand for radiotherapy across all European countries will increase by an average of 16% between 2012 and 2025, with the highest expected increase being for prostate cancer cases (24%), according to a new study published in Radiotherapy and Oncology. [More]
Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, a group of Case Western University School of Medicine researchers presented their discovery of the full-length structure of a protein named Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 2 (TRPV2). [More]
Cutaneous ureterostomy with single stoma may reduce complications in older patients undergoing bladder cancer surgery

Cutaneous ureterostomy with single stoma may reduce complications in older patients undergoing bladder cancer surgery

A retrospective study indicates that for certain elderly patients undergoing surgery for bladder cancer, diverting urine from the bladder can be safely achieved with what's known as a cutaneous ureterostomy with a single stoma rather than the commonly used ileal conduit. [More]
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