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In North America, bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in men and in the top ten for women. In the United States, approximately 70,000 patients are newly diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. In addition, the cancers of many previously-diagnosed patients remain unresolved, sometimes leading to cystectomy (bladder removal) or death. Approximately 70% bladder cancer patients have the non-muscle-invasive form of bladder cancer at diagnosis.
AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca, MedImmune to provide update on extensive oncology pipeline at ASCO 2016

AstraZeneca and its global biologics research and development arm, MedImmune, will provide an update on their extensive oncology pipeline at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, USA, on 3-7 June 2016. [More]
Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

Tecentriq drug gets FDA approval to treat urothelial carcinoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Tecentriq (atezolizumab) to treat the most common type of bladder cancer, called urothelial carcinoma. This is the first product in its class (PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors) approved to treat this type of cancer. [More]
Ipsen partners with IMCB to advance understanding and research of Botulinum Neurotoxin Biology

Ipsen partners with IMCB to advance understanding and research of Botulinum Neurotoxin Biology

Ipsen S.A., a global specialty-driven pharmaceutical company, and the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), a research institute under the aegis of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore, today announced the signature of a research partnership to study the intracellular trafficking of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) within neurons. [More]
Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University. [More]
NBI-facilitated bladder tumour surgery can lower risk of cancer recurrence

NBI-facilitated bladder tumour surgery can lower risk of cancer recurrence

Research into bladder tumour surgery has found that using narrow band imaging can significantly reduce the risk of disease recurrence. [More]
Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Exercise can minimize side effects of drugs used in cancer treatment

Good nutrition and regular exercise combined are an effective way to reduce the risk of cancer and to prevent its recurrence. "This has been proven over and over," said Carol DeNysschen, associate professor and chair of the Health, Nutrition, and Dietetics Department at Buffalo State. "If we could only motivate people to eat better and move more, we'd have so much less chronic disease." [More]
Discovery of shared biological properties among DNA variants may help identify new therapeutic targets

Discovery of shared biological properties among DNA variants may help identify new therapeutic targets

The discovery of shared biological properties among independent variants of DNA sequences offers the opportunity to broaden understanding of the biological basis of disease and identify new therapeutic targets, according to a collaboration between the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona Health Sciences, and Vanderbilt University. The group published their findings this month in npj Genomic Medicine. [More]
Investigators explore possible causes for cancer recurrence after LRC

Investigators explore possible causes for cancer recurrence after LRC

Although laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continue to grow in popularity and are successful in the treatment of bladder cancer, they are still considered experimental approaches. Using data collected by the Section of Uro-Technology of the European Association of Urology (ESUT), a team of researchers found that about 5% of patients experienced unexpected relapses of cancer after LRC, even with favorable pathology. [More]
Radiotherapy needs likely to increase in all European countries by 2025

Radiotherapy needs likely to increase in all European countries by 2025

The demand for radiotherapy across all European countries will increase by an average of 16% between 2012 and 2025, with the highest expected increase being for prostate cancer cases (24%), according to a new study published in Radiotherapy and Oncology. [More]
Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

Study reveals TRPV2 protein as new target for chronic pain, cancer treatments

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, a group of Case Western University School of Medicine researchers presented their discovery of the full-length structure of a protein named Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 2 (TRPV2). [More]
Cutaneous ureterostomy with single stoma may reduce complications in older patients undergoing bladder cancer surgery

Cutaneous ureterostomy with single stoma may reduce complications in older patients undergoing bladder cancer surgery

A retrospective study indicates that for certain elderly patients undergoing surgery for bladder cancer, diverting urine from the bladder can be safely achieved with what's known as a cutaneous ureterostomy with a single stoma rather than the commonly used ileal conduit. [More]
Study reveals adaptive IGRT for bladder preservation has good oncological outcomes

Study reveals adaptive IGRT for bladder preservation has good oncological outcomes

A prospective study examining a trimodality treatment approach in localized bladder cancer cases using adaptive image-guided, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) found that the bladder preservation rate at three years was 83 percent. [More]

Novel approach to cancer risk assessment maximizes public health benefits

Edward Calabrese, the University of Massachusetts Amherst environmental toxicologist who has been an outspoken critic of the current linear no-threshold (LNT) approach to risk assessment for radiation and toxic chemicals, now proposes a new approach integrating LNT with hormetic dose-response models. [More]
Parasitic flatworm rejuvenates its skin to survive in human bloodstream

Parasitic flatworm rejuvenates its skin to survive in human bloodstream

A parasitic flatworm that infects hundreds of millions of people in the developing world is able to survive in the bloodstream for decades by constantly renewing its skin - a mechanism that could inform potential new treatments against infection. [More]
New subtype of bladder cancer shares molecular signatures with breast cancer

New subtype of bladder cancer shares molecular signatures with breast cancer

Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer among men in the United States. While low-grade tumors have a very favorable prognosis, muscle-invasive and metastatic tumors have poorer survival rates. [More]
Experimental drug improves survival rate of majority of lung cancer patients compared to standard chemotherapy

Experimental drug improves survival rate of majority of lung cancer patients compared to standard chemotherapy

In global clinical trials, patients with advanced metastatic lung cancer who were treated with a targeted immunotherapy drug lived significantly longer and with fewer side effects than those who received standard second-line chemotherapy, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal The Lancet. [More]
Latest and final review of health problems related to Agent Orange exposure during Vietnam War

Latest and final review of health problems related to Agent Orange exposure during Vietnam War

The latest and final in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War changed the categorization of health outcomes for bladder cancer, hypothyroidism, and spina bifida and clarified the breadth of the previous finding for Parkinson's disease. [More]
VTE patients tend to die earlier from bladder cancer

VTE patients tend to die earlier from bladder cancer

In a study of 3879 patients who underwent radical cystectomy to treat bladder cancer, 3.6% were diagnosed with a venous thromboembolism (VTE)—which occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein, potentially breaking loose and traveling to the lung—within 1 month of their surgical admission date. [More]
Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute awards grants for 10 bladder cancer research projects

Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute awards grants for 10 bladder cancer research projects

A study of obesity and related metabolic changes on bladder cancer incidence and deaths, and a plan to use stem cells to grow novel urinary tubes are among 10 research projects awarded funding by the Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute. [More]
New article describes recent efforts made by researchers to classify bladder cancers

New article describes recent efforts made by researchers to classify bladder cancers

The ability to map the human genome has transformed how scientists and researchers classify various cancers. In the past, cancer cells were examined through a microscope and their appearance, often enhanced with dyes or other agents, was used to categorize the type of cancer. [More]
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