Blood Clot News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Clot News and Research

A Blood Clot is a mass of blood that forms when blood platelets, proteins, and cells stick together. When a blood clot is attached to the wall of a blood vessel, it is called a thrombus. When it moves through the bloodstream and blocks the flow of blood in another part of the body, it is called an embolus.
New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New AHA/ASA guidelines recommend stent retrievers to treat strokes in selected patients

New devices called stent retrievers are enabling physicians to benefit selected patients who suffer strokes caused by blood clots. The devices effectively stop strokes in their tracks. [More]
Alnylam presents positive Phase 1 ALN-AT3 trial results in hemophilia at ISTH 2015 Congress

Alnylam presents positive Phase 1 ALN-AT3 trial results in hemophilia at ISTH 2015 Congress

Additional study results from 12 hemophilia A and B subjects demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of ALN-AT3 achieved potent and dose-dependent knockdown of AT of up to 86%. AT knockdown was highly durable, with effects lasting over two months after the last dose, supporting further evaluation of a once-monthly subcutaneous dose regimen. [More]
Atrial fibrillation patients who stop blood thinners before elective surgery have less risk of major bleeding

Atrial fibrillation patients who stop blood thinners before elective surgery have less risk of major bleeding

Patients with atrial fibrillation who stopped taking blood thinners before they had elective surgery had no higher risk of developing blood clots and less risk of major bleeding compared to patients who were given a "bridge" therapy, according to research led by Duke Medicine. [More]
Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world

Findings could help improve patient care, reduce cancer screening costs around the world

A large clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa has found that contrary to expectations, a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis does not improve cancer detection in people with unexplained blood clots in their legs and lungs. [More]
Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

Preventing neutrophils from producing NETs can accelerate wound healing in diabetic mice

One of the body's tools for fighting off infection in a wound may actually slow down the healing process, according to new research by a team of Harvard University, Boston Children's Hospital, and Penn State University scientists. [More]
Study suggests that blood clots in abdominal vein could be an indicator of undiagnosed cancer

Study suggests that blood clots in abdominal vein could be an indicator of undiagnosed cancer

New research published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), concludes that a blood clot in an abdominal vein may be an indicator of undiagnosed cancer. The study also suggests that these clots predict poorer survival in patients with liver and pancreatic cancer. [More]
Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]
Data from statewide quality collaborative helps surgeons to reduce rates of serious trauma complication

Data from statewide quality collaborative helps surgeons to reduce rates of serious trauma complication

As health insurers place more emphasis on paying for quality outcomes rather than for specific services provided by doctors and hospitals, several quality improvement programs have been developed as a way to help health care providers identify problem areas and share best practices. While some studies have evaluated how well these quality improvement programs achieve their goals, not many have focused on the area of trauma care. [More]
Weekly sessions of non-invasive brain stimulation improve outcomes in patients with post-stroke pain

Weekly sessions of non-invasive brain stimulation improve outcomes in patients with post-stroke pain

Weekly sessions of non-invasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation provided sufficient long-term pain relief in 61 percent of patients with central post-stroke pain, and delivered long-term relief for patients who continued for one year, according to a study presented at the International Neuromodulation Society 12th World Congress by Masahito Kobayashi, MD, PhD, of the Department of Neurosurgery, Saitama Medical University - Department of Neurology, Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Mihara Memorial Hospital in Saitama, Japan. [More]
Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen, Bayer HealthCare initiate CALLISTO program to study rivaroxaban in patients with active cancer

Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its development partner, Bayer HealthCare, today announced the initiation of CALLISTO, a new comprehensive clinical research program for their novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, in patients with active cancer. The studies are evaluating the medicine for the prevention and treatment of life-threatening blood clots in patients with a wide range of cancer types. [More]
New multi-tasking stent could reduce risks associated with coronary artery procedure

New multi-tasking stent could reduce risks associated with coronary artery procedure

Every year, an estimated half-million Americans undergo surgery to have a stent prop open a coronary artery narrowed by plaque. But sometimes the mesh tubes get clogged. Scientists report in the journal ACS Nano a new kind of multi-tasking stent that could minimize the risks associated with the procedure. [More]
Blood-thinning treatment safe for patients with brain metastases

Blood-thinning treatment safe for patients with brain metastases

Cancer patients with brain metastases who develop blood clots may safely receive blood thinners without increased risk of dangerous bleeding, according to a study, published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. [More]
UTHealth professor awarded $1 million grant from Stryker Neurovascular for stroke research

UTHealth professor awarded $1 million grant from Stryker Neurovascular for stroke research

A $1 million grant for stroke research has been awarded from Stryker Neurovascular to Amrou Sarraj, M.D., assistant professor of neurology at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Atrial fibrillation linked to only one type of heart attack

Refining the results of a 2013 study, researchers have found that atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, is associated with only one type of heart attack - the more common of the two types. [More]
Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Specific altered function in heart's left atrium may signal stroke risk in people with a-fib

Stroke is a frequent and dreaded complication of atrial fibrillation. But predicting which of the estimated six million Americans with a-fib are at highest risk has long challenged physicians weighing stroke risk against the serious side effects posed by lifelong therapy with warfarin and other blood thinners. [More]
Warfarin and PT-INR testing: an interview with Paul Wright, CEO, Universal Biosensors

Warfarin and PT-INR testing: an interview with Paul Wright, CEO, Universal Biosensors

There are roughly 10 million people worldwide taking Warfarin, accounting for more than 200 million point of care (POC) PT-INR tests performed globally each year... [More]
Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

Changes in height can affect risk of coronary heart disease

The shorter you are- the more your risk of coronary heart disease. That's the key finding of a new study led by the University of Leicester which discovered that every 2.5 inches change in your height affected your risk of coronary heart disease by 13.5%. For example, compared to a 5ft 6inch tall person, a 5 foot tall person on average has a 32% higher risk of coronary heart disease because of their relatively shorter stature. [More]
TOAST classification remains effective, easy-to-use system to classify strokes

TOAST classification remains effective, easy-to-use system to classify strokes

In 1993, neurologists Harold P. Adams Jr., MD, and Jose Biller, MD, and colleagues proposed a new way to classify strokes. It became known as the TOAST classification. Twenty-two years later, the TOAST classification remains an effective and easy-to-use system that is routinely employed in stroke studies around the world, Drs. Adams and Biller report in the journal Stroke, published online ahead of print. [More]
New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

Elizabeth Celli was experiencing a moderate-to-severe stroke when she arrived at Loyola University Medical Center's Emergency Department. Mrs. Celli was weak on her left side, had difficulty speaking and was unable to walk. But after being treated with a new device called a stent retriever, her symptoms dramatically reversed. [More]
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