Blood Clot News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Clot News and Research

A Blood Clot is a mass of blood that forms when blood platelets, proteins, and cells stick together. When a blood clot is attached to the wall of a blood vessel, it is called a thrombus. When it moves through the bloodstream and blocks the flow of blood in another part of the body, it is called an embolus.
Study shows prehospital thrombolysis delivered in STEMO improves outcomes in stroke patients

Study shows prehospital thrombolysis delivered in STEMO improves outcomes in stroke patients

When treating a patient with stroke, every minute counts. A specialized stroke ambulance (Stroke Emergency Mobile or STEMO) allows physicians to start specific treatment, such as thrombolysis, at scene. [More]
New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

New bioinspired device could diagnose formation of blood clots

When in dysfunction, the vascular endothelium -- the tissue that lines the blood vessels throughout our body's entire circulatory system -- plays a big role in the development of many human diseases, including diabetes, stroke, heart disease, viral infections and cancer. [More]
Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect

Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect

An updated recommendation from the American Academy of Neurology states that catheter-based closure should not be routinely recommended for people who have had a stroke and also have a heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO), a channel between the top two chambers in the heart. [More]
Hematology researchers develop new bio-engineered clotting factor to control bleeding

Hematology researchers develop new bio-engineered clotting factor to control bleeding

Every five minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a blood clot, through its role in strokes, heart attacks or other severe conditions. [More]
Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries

Early initiation of prophylaxis linked to lower rates of PE and DVT in patients with severe brain injuries

People who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at high risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). PE is a leading cause of death in these patients. [More]
Menopause symptoms: can a healthcare professional help? An interview with Dr Heather Currie

Menopause symptoms: can a healthcare professional help? An interview with Dr Heather Currie

The survey showed that only 50% of women consulted a healthcare professional about their symptoms, despite the fact that many women said their symptoms were having a significant effect on their work life, social life, home life and sex life. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

In an article published online April 16, 2016 by the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report promising 90-day outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots who underwent thrombectomy or clot removal using the direct-aspiration, first pass technique. [More]
Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

New devices called stent retrievers, which effectively reverse strokes, have revolutionized the treatment of certain stroke patients, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics. [More]
New magnetically controlled drug safe, effective in dissolving blood clots

New magnetically controlled drug safe, effective in dissolving blood clots

Critical conditions associated with the blockage of blood vessels are one of the primary health concerns worldwide. [More]
Study shows childhood adversities, sleep disturbances interfere with immune system regulation

Study shows childhood adversities, sleep disturbances interfere with immune system regulation

Adverse childhood experiences and sleep disturbances interfere with immune system regulation, shows research from the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

There are more well-founded therapy options for the treatment of strokes than ever before. Care has to be reorganised before these innovations are actually used on patients. At the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen, experts are discussing just how to do that successfully - from guidelines for the use of thrombectomy procedures all the way to the structure and expansion of stroke care units. [More]
UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

UTHealth's Mobile Stroke Unit fights stroke through research, technology and patient care

About 800,000 strokes occur in America each year; that's about one every 40 seconds. Houston resident Joe Carrabba experienced one of them. [More]
New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

New therapy may reduce stroke risk in severe sickle cell disease patients

Eleven-year-old Martin Mwita, of Omaha, has made more than 300 visits to health care facilities since he was a baby. Because of sickle cell disease, he's suffered three strokes and countless other health episodes. [More]
Shoulder, arm pain could stem from thoracic outlet syndrome

Shoulder, arm pain could stem from thoracic outlet syndrome

Shoulder and arm pain come with the territory for some athletes and certain occupations like hair stylists, mechanics, even office workers. [More]
Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

Mice study shows heart medication helps reduce build-up of plaque in brain's blood vessels

A new study from örebro University, published in Science Signaling today, shows that heart medication reduces the build-up of plaque in the brain's blood vessels in mice. The question is if this is true also in humans? If the answer is yes, it might bring scientists a step closer to developing a medicine against Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

Study explores incidence of heart failure following myocardial infarction

One in four patients develop heart failure within four years of a first heart attack, according to a study in nearly 25 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Johannes Gho, a cardiology resident at the University Medical Center Utrecht, in Utrecht, the Netherlands. [More]
Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Pre-procedural use of antiplatelet therapy becoming less routine in heart attack treatment

Doctors worried about dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing a coronary artery procedure— such as angioplasty to treat a heart attack — will often administer antiplatelet therapy to head off complications. [More]
Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

Study finds that ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator has excellent calibration

The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Surgical Risk Calculator accurately estimates the chance of a patient experiencing postoperative complications, and its performance can improve with recalibration of the tool according to research findings appearing online in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in advance of print publication. [More]
New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

A laboratory blood test developed at Johns Hopkins for the diagnosis of a rare genetic red blood cell disorder also shows promise in identifying HELLP syndrome, a life-threatening high blood pressure condition affecting 1 percent of all pregnant women that causes hypertension along with end organ damage, researchers report in the May issue of the journal Experimental Hematology. [More]
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