Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Scientists discover key 'twist' in Rubik's cube-like plant puzzle

Scientists discover key 'twist' in Rubik's cube-like plant puzzle

Scientists at the John Innes Centre have discovered a key "twist" in a Rubik's cube-like plant puzzle, which could pave the way to new, or more effective pharmaceuticals. [More]
New study shows patient’s self-rated health can be better predictor of illness and death

New study shows patient’s self-rated health can be better predictor of illness and death

Patients' self-rated health is a better long-term predictor of illness and death than standard blood tests, blood pressure measurements or other symptomatic evidence a doctor might gather, according to a new study from Rice University. [More]
UCLA researchers find that male and female brains have opposite response patterns

UCLA researchers find that male and female brains have opposite response patterns

While measuring brain activity with magnetic resonance imaging during blood pressure trials, UCLA researchers found that men and women had opposite responses in the right front of the insular cortex, a part of the brain integral to the experience of emotions, blood pressure control and self-awareness. [More]
Medical weight-loss programs help people develop healthier lifestyle habits

Medical weight-loss programs help people develop healthier lifestyle habits

Because Valerie Prim grew up in a large Italian family, food has always been an important part of her life. [More]
Study finds ethnic differences in circadian blood pressure variation

Study finds ethnic differences in circadian blood pressure variation

Differences in circadian blood pressure variation due to a combination of genetic and cultural factors may contribute to ethnic differences in cardiovascular morbidity, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. [More]
Boy babies more likely to experience complications at birth than girls

Boy babies more likely to experience complications at birth than girls

New research led by the University of Adelaide has confirmed that boy babies are much more likely to experience potentially life-threatening outcomes at birth than girls. [More]
Taking probiotics can reduce body weight and BMI

Taking probiotics can reduce body weight and BMI

Consuming probiotics, so-called 'good bacteria', can reduce body weight and body mass index (BMI) according to a new meta-analysis published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. [More]
Thousands of volunteers join clinical trial to help transform early detection of diabetic eye disease

Thousands of volunteers join clinical trial to help transform early detection of diabetic eye disease

More than 4,500 people from Liverpool with diabetes have volunteered to join a clinical trial funded by the National Institute for Health Research to help transform early detection of diabetic eye disease. [More]
UCI researchers use new imaging method to measure fat metabolism

UCI researchers use new imaging method to measure fat metabolism

A team from the University of California, Irvine and supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering has used a new imaging technique to measure how people break down dietary fat into products the cells of their bodies can use. [More]
Aggressive home blood pressure monitoring may contribute to rise in emergency department visits

Aggressive home blood pressure monitoring may contribute to rise in emergency department visits

Visits to emergency departments for patients with hypertension increased by 64 percent between 2002 and 2012 while hospitalizations for those visits declined by 28 percent. [More]
Exercise during pregnancy can have benefits for mom and baby

Exercise during pregnancy can have benefits for mom and baby

Researchers collected and re-examined clinical trial data on exercise during pregnancy and whether it plays a role in preterm birth, and found that exercise is safe and does not increase the risk of preterm birth. [More]
Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt

Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt

Salt (sodium chloride) is an essential nutrient, but one that is often present in surprising quantities in industrially processed foods. [More]
Taking extra 1000 steps each day can improve health of children with type 1 diabetes

Taking extra 1000 steps each day can improve health of children with type 1 diabetes

Keeping count of daily steps and boosting physical activity can really pay off for children with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Adelaide and the Women's and Children's Hospital. [More]
European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

European Commission approves extended indication for Amgen's Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for the treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma patients

Amgen has announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved a variation to the marketing authorization for Kyprolis® (carfilzomib) to include use in combination with dexamethasone alone for adult patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. The extended indication marks the second approval for Kyprolis by the EC in less than a year. [More]
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
Quantum Genomics initiates Phase IIa trial for heart failure

Quantum Genomics initiates Phase IIa trial for heart failure

Quantum Genomics, a biopharmaceutical company with the mission of developing new therapies for unmet medical needs in the field of cardiovascular diseases, today announced the initiation of its Phase IIa multicentric clinical trial of GQC101, entitled QUID HF (QUantum Genomics Incremental Dosing in Heart Failure), for the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure. The first three clinical centres of the European trial have been opened in France and Norway. [More]
Study finds link between cortisol levels and obesity in patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent depressions

Study finds link between cortisol levels and obesity in patients with bipolar disorder or recurrent depressions

Low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are linked to obesity, high levels of fat in the blood and metabolic syndrome among patients with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder. This according to a study at Umea University in Sweden published in the Journal of Affective Disorders. [More]
Bringing healthcare home: an interview with Dr Andrew Lin

Bringing healthcare home: an interview with Dr Andrew Lin

The goal of CliniCloud is to bring healthcare home. For us, what that means is a patient-centered and patient-modeled healthcare system, where we focus on the fact that consumers want access to healthcare and to a doctor. We're building an ecosystem around the tools and the software to really enable that to happen as conveniently and as affordably as possible. [More]
Antihypertensives prescribed for older adults despite having low blood pressure, study shows

Antihypertensives prescribed for older adults despite having low blood pressure, study shows

According to a new study in the journal Age and Ageing, a significant proportion of patients over 70 remain on antihypertensive medication despite having low blood pressure. [More]
Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

Risk of blindness from spinal-fusion surgery has declined, study shows

The risk of blindness caused by spinal fusion, one of the most common surgeries performed in the U.S., has dropped almost three-fold since the late 1990s, according to the largest study of the topic to date. [More]
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