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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Adolescent obesity linked to elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality in midlife

Adolescent obesity linked to elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality in midlife

A nationwide study of 2.3 million Israeli adolescents, examined from 1967 through 2010, finds an association between elevated body-mass index in late adolescence, and subsequent cardiovascular mortality in midlife. [More]
Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Falling asleep and waking up are key transitions in everyone's day. Millions of people have trouble with these transitions - they find it hard to fall asleep or stay asleep at night, and hard to stay awake during the day. Despite decades of research, how these transitions work - the neurobiological mechanics of our circadian rhythm - has remained largely a mystery to brain scientists. [More]
High dosages of antihistamines have dulling effect on genes associated with post-exercise recovery

High dosages of antihistamines have dulling effect on genes associated with post-exercise recovery

After vigorous exercise, some 3,000 genes go to work to aid recovery by boosting muscles and blood vessels, but in the presence of high doses of antihistamines almost 27 percent of the gene response is blunted, according to University of Oregon researchers. [More]
Rush awarded $14.5 million NIA grant to study effects of MIND diet on Alzheimer's disease

Rush awarded $14.5 million NIA grant to study effects of MIND diet on Alzheimer's disease

Can a particular diet prevent Alzheimer's disease? The National Institute of Aging has invested heavily in Rush University Medical Center to try to find out. [More]
Depression combined with behavioral, metabolic symptoms increases risk of type 2 diabetes

Depression combined with behavioral, metabolic symptoms increases risk of type 2 diabetes

Depression may compound the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with such early warning signs of metabolic disease as obesity, high blood pressure and unhealthy cholesterol levels, according to researchers from McGill University, l'Université de Montréal, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal and the University of Calgary. [More]
Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program (A.S.A.P) has seen an increase in the number of patients being treated for alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy linked to tick bites. [More]
Entresto drug shows added benefit in symptomatic chronic heart failure

Entresto drug shows added benefit in symptomatic chronic heart failure

The fixed-dose combination of sacubitril and valsartan (trade name: Entresto) has been approved since November 2015 for adults with symptomatic chronic heart failure with reduced pump function (ejection fraction). The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) now examined in an early benefit assessment whether this drug combination offers an added benefit for patients in comparison with the appropriate comparator therapy. [More]
Phenotypic personalized medicine can identify a person's optimal drug, dose combinations

Phenotypic personalized medicine can identify a person's optimal drug, dose combinations

For decades, doctors and scientists have predicted that personalized medicine — tailoring drug doses and combinations to people's specific diseases and body chemistry — would be the future of health care. [More]
Health benefits of gastric bypass surgery start soon after procedure

Health benefits of gastric bypass surgery start soon after procedure

The health benefits of Roux-en Y gastric bypass surgery—a surgical weight-loss procedure in which the stomach is made smaller—start soon after the procedure. New research presented today at the Experimental Biology 2016 meeting in San Diego found that patients who underwent the procedure already showed some reductions in weight, waist circumference and body mass index one week after the procedure. [More]
Person's age, mobility could be powerful predictors of survival than certain biomarkers

Person's age, mobility could be powerful predictors of survival than certain biomarkers

Advances in technology allow scientists to measure intricate details about the human body that greatly enhance understanding of health, disease and aging. [More]
Better management of blood sugar, blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol levels could reduce cardiovascular risk

Better management of blood sugar, blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol levels could reduce cardiovascular risk

While controlling blood pressure, blood sugar and LDL-cholesterol levels reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes, only 7 percent of diabetic participants in three major heart studies had recommended levels of these three factors, according to research from the Heart Disease Prevention Program at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

Wake Forest Baptist researchers looking for ways to keep older adults on their feet

There's no getting around it: Simply getting around is a major issue for older adults.
"People are in nursing homes for two reasons, either they can't think or they can't walk," said Stephen Kritchevsky, Ph.D., director of the Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. North Carolina. "We're working very hard on the thinking part, and the walking part is equally important. [More]
Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) approved for multiple indications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Inflectra (infliximab-dyyb) for multiple indications. Inflectra is administered by intravenous infusion. This is the second biosimilar approved by the FDA. [More]
Losmapimod drug fails to meet primary endpoint in clinical trial

Losmapimod drug fails to meet primary endpoint in clinical trial

Patients taking losmapimod, an anti-inflammatory drug currently being developed, for 12 weeks following a heart attack did not show improvements in the trial's primary endpoint, the rate of cardiovascular death, subsequent heart attack or urgent coronary revascularization, which includes placement of a stent or coronary artery bypass surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Investigational drug provides no improved protection to patients with contrast-induced acute kidney injury

Patients treated with CMX-2043--an investigational drug that has previously shown some ability to protect heart muscle from damage during stenting--saw no improved protection in their kidneys compared to placebo, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Two established atrial fibrillation ablation techniques show similar effects, safety outcomes

Two established atrial fibrillation ablation techniques show similar effects, safety outcomes

Two established techniques for correcting the root cause of the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation show similar effects and safety outcomes, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

Adding liraglutide to diet and exercise plan may help people lose weight, reduce diabetes risk

For people with prediabetes who are overweight or obese, adding 3.0 mg of liraglutide for three years to a diet and exercise plan may lead to major health improvements, new industry-sponsored research suggests. The results will be presented Monday, April 4, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]

Inhalable form of Ambrisentan drug could offer faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema

In a new study, researchers show an aerosolized, inhalable form of the drug Ambrisentan could offer a faster-acting treatment option for pulmonary edema, a life-threatening condition in which fluid accumulates in the lungs. Pulmonary edema is a significant risk for anyone spending time at high altitudes, and also affects people with chronic conditions including congestive heart failure and sickle cell anemia. [More]
Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Intravenous beta blockers offer no clinical benefit to patients with STEMI

Giving intravenous beta blockers before performing a coronary angioplasty in patients who had experienced the deadliest form of heart attack—ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—was safe but did not reduce heart attack severity or improve blood flow from the heart's main pumping chamber, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants overstimulate aldosterone in a way that may lead to cardiovascular disease

Brominated fire retardants, used in many consumer products and known to cause hormonal irregularities, overstimulates an adrenal gland hormone in a way that may lead to the development of cardiovascular disease, new research in human cells finds. Researchers will present their study results Saturday at the Endocrine Society's 98th annual meeting in Boston. [More]
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