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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Study links whole grain consumption to positive health effects

Eating three more portions of dietary fiber a day--say, two pieces of whole grain bread and a bowl of whole grain breakfast cereal--is associated with a lower risk for all cardiovascular diseases and for dying of cancer, diabetes, and respiratory and infectious diseases, a study just published in the BMJ has shown. [More]
Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

Portal vein hypertension diminishes after hepatitis C recovery

This inflammatory viral infection of the liver causes inflexible scar tissue to form. This in turn impedes blood flow through the organ, with resulting hypertension in the portal vein. [More]
CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

Significant improvements seen across multiple sociodemographic groups, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine [More]
Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Blood pressure medications can lower stroke, heart attack risk in patients with end-stage renal disease

Two classes of blood pressure medications, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), are associated with a 16% lower risk of strokes, heart attacks and death in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing peritoneal dialysis, a new study in the journal, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, reports. [More]
Many Brazilians not taking advantage of health benefits of exercise

Many Brazilians not taking advantage of health benefits of exercise

As Brazilians make final preparations to host the world's premier showcase of athleticism, the Olympics, a new paper in the Journal of the American Heart Association reports that many citizens of the host country are not taking enough advantage of the health benefits of exercise. [More]
Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Liraglutide drug effectively decreases cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes patients

Researchers have shown that the glucose-lowering drug liraglutide safely and effectively decreases the overall risk of heart attack, stroke, or cardiovascular death for people with type 2 diabetes. [More]
'Hypertensive urgency' may cause unnecessary alarm

'Hypertensive urgency' may cause unnecessary alarm

Patients with a very high blood pressure reading in the absence of other symptoms are highly unlikely to have a major adverse cardiovascular event within the next 6 months, researchers report. [More]
Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution becomes leading risk factor for stroke worldwide

Air pollution – including environmental and household air pollution - has emerged as a leading risk factor for stroke worldwide, associated with about a third of the global burden of stroke in 2013, according to a new study published in The Lancet Neurology journal. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Low birth weight, stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health issues in women

Low birth weight, stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health issues in women

Low birth weight or stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health problems in women, according to a study published today in The Journal of Physiology. [More]
U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

Older Americans with diabetes born in the 1940s are living longer and with less disability performing day to day tasks than those born 10 years earlier, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

People with type 2 diabetes who intensively controlled their blood sugar level during the landmark Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial Eye Study were found to have cut their risk of diabetic retinopathy in half in a follow-up analysis conducted four years after stopping intensive therapy. [More]
ATACH-2 disputes intensive BP control benefits in acute ICH

ATACH-2 disputes intensive BP control benefits in acute ICH

Reducing systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mmHg has offered no benefits over standard care for patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage in the ATACH-2 trial. [More]
CRP may guide vascular risk assessment in obese

CRP may guide vascular risk assessment in obese

Low C-reactive protein levels may identify obese people who are unlikely to develop cardiovascular complications over subsequent years, show data from the EPIC study. [More]
Women more likely to be hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke than men, say researchers

Women more likely to be hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke than men, say researchers

A 15 year study in 1.1 million patients with atrial fibrillation has found that women are 23% more likely to be hospitalised for acute ischaemic stroke than men. The research was presented today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016 by Dr Ghanshyam Shantha, a cardiovascular disease fellow at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa, US. [More]
Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

Standard and intensive blood pressure treatments equally effective in controlling acute intracerebral hemorrhage

An international stroke study found that standard and intensive blood pressure treatments were equally effective in the emergency treatment of acute intracerebral hemorrhage, a type of stroke caused by bleeding into the brain. [More]
NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

NMR-based metabolomics: an interview with Prof. Claudio Luchinat

We started from theoretical inorganic to bioinorganic chemistry, so looking at metals in proteins, enzymes and so on. About 30% of all the proteins that we have are metalloproteins, so it’s a huge contribution that inorganic chemistry is providing for life. [More]
Aromatherapy-based foot massages may provide inexpensive, simple way to manage anxiety

Aromatherapy-based foot massages may provide inexpensive, simple way to manage anxiety

Researchers at Okayama University conduct the first community-based study on the effects of self-administered aromatherapy foot massage on stress and anxiety symptoms. The results suggest aromatherapy massages might provide an inexpensive, simple way of managing anxiety. [More]
Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Cabozantinib drug can extend lives of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma

Data presented today at the American Society of Clinical Oncology congress showed that cabozantinib, a next generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) can extend the lives of patients by nearly two years following failure of one or more anti-angiogenic therapies almost five months longer than everolimus, a current standard of care therapy. [More]
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