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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Experts identify new strategies for using EHRs to treat chronic kidney disease patients

Experts identify new strategies for using EHRs to treat chronic kidney disease patients

Experts have identified new strategies for using electronic health records (EHRs) to treat patients with chronic kidney disease. These recommendations may help clinicians and hospitals better manage individual patients with chronic conditions and identify groups of patients most likely to benefit from different treatment strategies. [More]
UC Santa Barbara professor develops novel therapeutic strategy for PKD

UC Santa Barbara professor develops novel therapeutic strategy for PKD

For the 12 million people worldwide who suffer from polycystic kidney disease (PKD), an inherited disorder with no known cure, a new treatment option may be on the horizon. [More]
Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, increase stroke risk

Living in an area with noisy road traffic may reduce life expectancy, according to new research published in the European Heart Journal. [More]
Cytokine levels may help distinguish patients with suicidality

Cytokine levels may help distinguish patients with suicidality

One American dies from suicide every 12.8 minutes, making suicide the tenth leading cause of death in the United States according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. [More]
Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals to use electronic tablets to record patient observations

Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals to use electronic tablets to record patient observations

Following on from the recent announcement of funding for Ashford and St Peter’s new electronic medical record as part of the Surrey Collaborative, the hospital is also the recipient of funding from the Nursing Technology Fund for this project. [More]
Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Obesity and excess weight, and their negative impact on health, have become a significant focus for physicians and other health-care experts in recent years. [More]
FDA-approved antihypertensive drug can stop cocaine and alcohol addiction

FDA-approved antihypertensive drug can stop cocaine and alcohol addiction

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have successfully stopped cocaine and alcohol addiction in experiments using a drug already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat high blood pressure. If the treatment is proven effective in humans, it would be the first of its kind -- one that could help prevent relapses by erasing the unconscious memories that underlie addiction. [More]
Study: High-normal BP in young adults spells heart failure risk in later life

Study: High-normal BP in young adults spells heart failure risk in later life

Mild elevations in blood pressure considered to be in the upper range of normal during young adulthood can lead to subclinical heart damage by middle age -- a condition that sets the stage for full-blown heart failure, according to findings of a federally funded study led by scientists at Johns Hopkins. [More]
The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

The Lancet Oncology publishes results of CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) Phase III trial for HCC treatment

Eli Lilly and Company announced that The Lancet Oncology has published results of the Phase III REACH trial that evaluated CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) as a second-line treatment for people with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), also known as liver cancer. While the REACH trial's primary endpoint of overall survival favored the CYRAMZA arm, it was not statistically significant. [More]
Patient survival rates for home hemodialysis significantly higher than peritoneal dialysis

Patient survival rates for home hemodialysis significantly higher than peritoneal dialysis

NxStage Medical, Inc. is encouraging patients to take control of their dialysis therapy and consider home hemodialysis in the wake of a new study that found patient survivability rates are significantly higher with home hemodialysis (HHD) than peritoneal dialysis (PD). [More]
High fructose consumption can lead to uncontrolled growth of cardiomyocytes, heart attack

High fructose consumption can lead to uncontrolled growth of cardiomyocytes, heart attack

'Walk through any supermarket and take a look at the labels on food products, and you'll see that many of them contain fructose, often in the form of sucrose (table sugar)' -- that's how Wilhelm Krek, professor for cell biology at ETH Zurich's Institute for Molecular Health Sciences, summarises the problem with today's nutrition. [More]
Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Simple test could help identify genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer

Men with an elevated, genetically inherited risk for prostate cancer could be routinely identified with a simple blood or urine test, scientists at UC San Francisco and Kaiser Permanente Northern California have concluded, potentially paving the way to better or earlier diagnosis. [More]
Low heart rate variability may place women at risk for sexual dysfunction

Low heart rate variability may place women at risk for sexual dysfunction

Chances are good that women with a low heart rate variability also suffer from sexual dysfunction. That's the finding from a study led by Amelia Stanton of The University of Texas at Austin in the US published in Springer's journal Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. [More]
Reducing short breaks between shifts enhances nurses' recovery from work

Reducing short breaks between shifts enhances nurses' recovery from work

Reducing short breaks between shifts helps nurses recover from work, according to a new study from Finland. The study analysed the effects of longer rest and recovery periods between shifts on heart rate variability, which is an indicator of recovery. [More]
UCSF researchers find that people divided on cardiovascular benefits of alcohol consumption

UCSF researchers find that people divided on cardiovascular benefits of alcohol consumption

In one of the first published studies using data from the Health eHeart Study, UCSF researchers have found that people are divided on the cardiovascular benefits of alcohol consumption. And, those who do perceive alcohol as "heart healthy" drink substantially more than their counterparts. [More]
Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

In recognition of 10 years of publication Future Cardiology has launched a special issue focused on recent advances and emerging challenges in specific areas of cardiology. [More]

WSU researchers receive U.S. patent for new anesthesia monitoring system

A team of researchers from Wayne State University was recently issued a U.S. patent (# 8,998,808) on a technology that will offer anesthesiologists better methods for monitoring and managing patients in the operating room. [More]
Updated March of Dimes CineMama app helps women to track their weight gain during pregnancy

Updated March of Dimes CineMama app helps women to track their weight gain during pregnancy

Gaining too much or too little weight during pregnancy can have serious health consequences for your baby. The updated March of Dimes CineMama app helps moms-to-be track their weight gain as well as make a time-lapse movie of their pregnancy. The app is free and available for both iOS and android devices. [More]
HIV testing in Coventry, UK to become routine part of registering with GP

HIV testing in Coventry, UK to become routine part of registering with GP

HIV testing in Coventry (UK) is to become a routine part of registering with a GP at ten surgeries across the city, which has the highest prevalence of the condition in the West Midlands. [More]
Pharmacists play vital role in improving health of patients with Type 2 diabetes

Pharmacists play vital role in improving health of patients with Type 2 diabetes

Over the past nine years, Scot H. Simpson, professor in the faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Alberta, has been studying the role of pharmacists on primary care teams and their impact on the health of patients with Type 2 diabetes. [More]
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