Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
New data on possible protective behaviors and dementia risk factors emerges at AAIC- 2014

New data on possible protective behaviors and dementia risk factors emerges at AAIC- 2014

Participation in activities that promote mental activity, and moderate physical activity in middle age, may help protect against the development of Alzheimer's disease and dementia in later life, according to new research reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference- 2014 (AAIC- 2014) in Copenhagen. [More]
Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of the adverse health effects of too much sitting, according to a new study by researchers from the American Cancer Society, The Cooper Institute, and the University of Texas. [More]
Improving type 2 diabetes management: an interview with Sir Michael Hirst, President of the International Diabetes Federation

Improving type 2 diabetes management: an interview with Sir Michael Hirst, President of the International Diabetes Federation

One study suggested that 42 percent of people with type 2 diabetes who are treated for the disease do not reach their blood sugar goals, putting them at higher risk of organ and tissue damage, blindness and even death. We wanted to explore potential causes of clinical inertia among physicians and people with diabetes, which may lead to sub-optimal care. [More]
Reduction in alcohol consumption beneficial for cardiovascular health

Reduction in alcohol consumption beneficial for cardiovascular health

A reduction in alcohol consumption, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, could be linked to improved cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index and blood pressure, according to new research published in The BMJ. [More]
Researchers evaluate antioxidant and antihypertensive activity in Jamapa black beans

Researchers evaluate antioxidant and antihypertensive activity in Jamapa black beans

Beans are one of the most important crops for the Mexican population due to its nutritional qualities. In fact, the country is one of the top 10 producers of this legume in the world, and several studies have reflected the correlation between consumption and decreased chronic degenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, obesity and diabetes. [More]
Reducing amount of alcoholic beverages consumed may improve cardiovascular health

Reducing amount of alcoholic beverages consumed may improve cardiovascular health

Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may improve cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure, according to a new multi-center study published in The BMJ and co-led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
WHO report provides updated overview of NCD situation

WHO report provides updated overview of NCD situation

As world leaders gather at the United Nations General Assembly to assess efforts made since 2011 in controlling noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) like heart disease, cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease, the new WHO "Noncommunicable diseases country profiles 2014" show progress has been insufficient and uneven. [More]
Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

Scientists develop RNA that binds cGMP

The transmission of signals within cells is dependent on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as an important secondary messenger. German scientists have now developed an RNA that binds cGMP. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it is possible to suppress the cGMP signal cascade in genetically modified cells that produce this RNA. [More]
Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, today announced the United States (U.S.) commercial availability of EVZIO for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression. [More]
New study reveals unique health challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada

New study reveals unique health challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada

For the first time, researchers have access to detailed information about how an urban Aboriginal population in Canada uses health care. A new study, called Our Health Counts, uses this health database to clearly demonstrate the unique challenges faced by urban Aboriginal people in Canada - according to researchers at St. Michael's Hospital. [More]
Pharmalink’s core patents for Nefecon issued in United States, Europe, China and Hong Kong

Pharmalink’s core patents for Nefecon issued in United States, Europe, China and Hong Kong

Pharmalink AB, a specialty pharma company focused on orphan and niche products, has had core patents for its late-stage clinical candidate Nefecon® issued in the key markets United States, Europe, China and Hong Kong. A patent is pending in Japan. [More]
Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

Exeter scientists find health benefits in rotten egg gas

It may smell of flatulence and have a reputation for being highly toxic, but when used in the right tiny dosage, hydrogen sulfide is now being being found to offer potential health benefits in a range of issues, from diabetes to stroke, heart attacks and dementia. A new compound (AP39), designed and made at the University of Exeter, could hold the key to future therapies, by targeting delivery of very small amounts of the substance to the right (or key) places inside cells. [More]
Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Study compares level of physical fitness of adolescents in south with centre and north of Europe

Adolescents in southern Europe are less fit in terms of cardiorespiratory capacity, strength and speed-agility than their central-northern European peers. Moreover, southern adolescents are more obese and present higher levels of total and abdominal fat than those from the centre-north of Europe. [More]
Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Although telemedicine could improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases, viable home care systems are still lacking. Scientists working on the EU-project "d-LIVER" mean to remedy this situation. Initial results have now been released. [More]
National prevention strategy for a healthy lifestyle

National prevention strategy for a healthy lifestyle

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), cancer, diabetes and chronic respiratory disorders - the incidence of these non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is constantly rising in industrialised countries. [More]
Study gives parents, doctors new options to treat children with eczema

Study gives parents, doctors new options to treat children with eczema

The number of children with atopic dermatitis, often referred to as eczema, is on the rise. Some estimate that one in five children in the U.S. now suffers from the painful, itchy skin condition. In an effort to control their symptoms, many children are prescribed powerful medications like immunosuppressants or topical steroids. [More]
Researchers discover novel biomarker that could help predict preeclampsia

Researchers discover novel biomarker that could help predict preeclampsia

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a biomarker that could give expecting mothers and their doctors the first simple blood test to reliably predict that a pregnant woman may develop preeclampsia, at least as early as 6 weeks into the pregnancy. [More]
Mylan launches Telmisartan Tablets USP

Mylan launches Telmisartan Tablets USP

Mylan Inc. today announced that it has launched Telmisartan Tablets USP, 20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg, the generic version of Boehringer Ingelheim's Micardis® Tablets. [More]
Hypertension does not respond to therapy due to inadequate diagnosis

Hypertension does not respond to therapy due to inadequate diagnosis

High blood pressure—also known as hypertension—is widespread, but treatment often fails. One in five people with hypertension does not respond to therapy. This is frequently due to inadequate diagnosis, as Franz Weber and Manfred Anlauf point out in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. [More]
Study documents impact of behavioural factors on life expectancy

Study documents impact of behavioural factors on life expectancy

Live longer thanks to fruit, an active lifestyle, limited alcohol and no cigarettes. This is the conclusion of a study by public health physicians at the University of Zurich who documented for the first time the impact of behavioural factors on life expectancy in numbers. The results are to be taken over into prevention and health counselling in primary care. [More]