Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Interarm blood pressure measurement advised for diabetic patients

Interarm blood pressure measurement advised for diabetic patients

Initial blood pressure measurements in patients with diabetes should be taken from both arms, say researchers. [More]
Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Study: Moderate to severe depression increases risk of heart failure by 40%

Moderate to severe depression increases the risk of heart failure by 40%, a study of nearly 63 000 Norwegians has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at EuroHeartCare 2014. [More]
Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Eating watermelon reduces blood pressure in overweight individuals

Be sure to pick up a watermelon - or two - at your neighborhood farmers' market. It could save your life. [More]
Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients who stay longer in ICU have substantial physical impairments 2 years later

Patients have substantial physical impairments even two years after being discharged from the hospital after a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU), new Johns Hopkins research suggests. [More]

Scientists find that ingredients in chocolate may help prevent obesity

Improved thinking. Decreased appetite. Lowered blood pressure. The potential health benefits of dark chocolate keep piling up, and scientists are now homing in on what ingredients in chocolate might help prevent obesity, as well as type-2 diabetes. They found that one particular type of antioxidant in cocoa prevented laboratory mice from gaining excess weight and lowered their blood sugar levels. The report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. [More]
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of Adacel® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]
Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Northwestern University awarded NIH grant to conduct phase III Parkinson's neuroprotective study

Tanya Simuni, M.D., medical director of Northwestern University's Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, was awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct a $16 million phase III study of the safety and efficacy of the drug isradipine as a potential neuroprotective agent in Parkinson's disease. [More]
High levels of GDNF protein could help body resist weight gain despite high-fat diet

High levels of GDNF protein could help body resist weight gain despite high-fat diet

​More than one-third of people in the US are obese. Obesity and its related health problems-including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, insulin resistance, and belly fat-affect so many, yet effective treatments are very few. [More]
Early strengthening activities can reduce cardiometabolic health risks in children

Early strengthening activities can reduce cardiometabolic health risks in children

Early strengthening activities can lead to a decrease in cardiometabolic health risks in children and adolescents, according to results of a new study by a Baylor University professor and a team of researchers. [More]

Research uncovers link between diet and blood cell markers of heart attack associated inflammation

New research further illuminates the heart-healthy benefits of the Mediterranean diet, tying the eating plan to lower levels of platelets and white blood cells, two markers of inflammation. Inflammation has an association with greater risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Clonidine increases hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery

Clonidine increases hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery

Clonidine - a drug that reduces blood pressure and heart rate - increased rates of clinically concerning hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery, according to the POISE-2 trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. [More]

Researchers discover anesthetic technique to reduce patients' blood pressure

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered that a commonly used anesthetic technique to reduce the blood pressure of patients undergoing surgery could increase the risk of starving the brain of oxygen. [More]
Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections at higher risk of developing plaque in their coronary arteries

Men with long-term HIV infections are at higher risk than uninfected men of developing plaque in their coronary arteries, regardless of their other risk factors for coronary artery disease, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. A report on the research appears in the April 1 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. [More]
Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with such cardiac risk factors as high blood pressure and elevated glucose levels have significantly worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a new study by dementia researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]

Rigorous blood pressure control could halve recurrent stroke risk

Ensuring that the blood pressure of stroke survivors is controlled at least three-quarters of the time may halve their risk of a recurrence, shows a secondary analysis of the VISP trial. [More]

rEVO Biologics commences ATryn Phase 3 clinical program for treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women

rEVO Biologics Inc., a subsidiary of LFB SA, today announced the initiation of the Phase 3 clinical program for ATryn for the treatment of preeclampsia in pregnant women during the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. [More]

Bariatric surgery patients report better quality of life

A study by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows bariatric surgery is a highly effective and durable treatment for type 2 diabetes in obese patients, enabling nearly all surgical patients to be free of insulin and many to be free of all diabetic medications three years after surgery. [More]
Genetic markers could help predict heart attack in patients with heart disease

Genetic markers could help predict heart attack in patients with heart disease

Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have identified a biological process that may help physicians predict when someone with heart disease is likely to have a heart attack in the near future. [More]

SEATTLE II study confirms safety and efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute PE

EKOS Corporation, a BTG International group company, notes the presentation of the results of the SEATTLE II trial this afternoon at ACC.14, the 63rd Annual Scientific Session and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology in Washington, DC in the United States. [More]
Researchers quantify proportion of adults potentially affected by updated 2014 BP recommendations

Researchers quantify proportion of adults potentially affected by updated 2014 BP recommendations

Applying the updated 2014 blood pressure (BP) guideline to the U.S. population suggests that nearly 6 million adults are no longer classified as needing hypertension medication, and that an estimated 13.5 million adults would now be considered as having achieved goal blood pressure, primarily older adults, according to a JAMA study released online to coincide with the 2014 American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions. [More]