Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels of employees

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]
Wearable diagnostic machines presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology

Wearable diagnostic machines presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology

Wearable E-skin that can measure heart rate and blood pressure, and paper diagnostic machines the size of a credit card that can give instant readings on blood and saliva samples are two new bio-sensing technologies presented at Elsevier's 4th International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology in Lisbon, Portugal on 12 May 2015. [More]
Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent State University researchers Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., as well as Kent State alumni Michael Rebold, Ph.D., and Gabe Sanders, Ph.D., assessed how common smartphone uses - texting and talking - interfere with treadmill exercise. [More]
New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

New study reveals genetic causes of rare syndrome that manifests as high blood pressure

The culmination of two decades of research, a new study reveals the genetic causes of a curious, rare syndrome that manifests as hypertension (high blood pressure) accompanied by short fingers (brachydactyly type E). [More]
Scientists find smooth muscle cells as major contributing factor to vascular stiffness

Scientists find smooth muscle cells as major contributing factor to vascular stiffness

Increased vascular stiffness has been identified as an important part of hypertension in aging adults. Previous studies of aortic stiffness have focused on changes in structural proteins that alter the properties of vascular walls causing them to become rigid. [More]
Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Scientists identify gene that causes hereditary hypertension and brachydactyly type E

Individuals with this altered gene have hereditary hypertension (high blood pressure) and at the same time a skeletal malformation called brachydactyly type E, which is characterized by unusually short fingers and toes. The effect on blood pressure is so serious that -- if left untreated -- it most often leads to death before age fifty. [More]
Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

Workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduces stress levels and risk of burnout

A study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that a workplace mindfulness-based intervention reduced stress levels of employees exposed to a highly stressful occupational environment. [More]

New data driven approach to healthcare

Isansys Lifecare Ltd, the provider of complete real-time physiological patient data services and systems, is this week celebrating its fifth anniversary... [More]
Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics provides update on business and financial results for Q1 2015

Orexigen Therapeutics, Inc. today announced business and financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2015. [More]
SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

SLU professor reveals why women have higher rates of strokes than men, suggests steps to reduce risk

Each year, around 55,000 more women than men will have a stroke. Longer lifespans, pregnancies and hormones all contribute to the disparity, as do illnesses that tend to strike women more frequently. Crunch the numbers and the math adds up to more strokes for women, making it important for women monitor their risk. [More]
GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project have created a new and much-anticipated data resource to help establish how differences in an individual's genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. [More]
Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

Loyola's Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital implements pediatric early warning scoring system

The Ronald McDonald Children's Hospital at Loyola University Medical Center has implemented a pediatric early warning scoring system to better identify children who are at-risk of becoming critically ill while in the hospital. [More]
Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

Relaxation response has significant impact on patients with gastrointestinal disorders

A pilot study has found that participating in a nine-week training program including elicitation of the relaxation response had a significant impact on clinical symptoms of the gastrointestinal disorders irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on the expression of genes related to inflammation and the body's response to stress. [More]
1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

1 in 5 people to develop heart failure in developed countries

One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new strategies to treat depression in children, adolescents

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new strategies to treat depression in children, adolescents

A multidisciplinary team of Johns Hopkins researchers has developed two new strategies to treat depression in young people using the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of medications. These strategies, published May 5 in the journal Translational Psychiatry, incorporate a new understanding of how to mitigate the risk of suicide while on SSRI treatment. [More]
New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

New study identifies enzyme that causes obesity-related hypertension

Obesity is a serious health problem affecting approximately one-third of the adult population in the United States. Obese individuals have an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. A recent study led by a University of Missouri researcher has identified the enzyme responsible for obesity-related hypertension -- a finding that could lead to new treatment options. [More]
Accelerated brain aging related to cognitive complications observed in people with type 1 diabetes

Accelerated brain aging related to cognitive complications observed in people with type 1 diabetes

The brains of people with type 1 diabetes show signs of accelerated aging that correlate with slower information processing, according to research led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]
AMC Health to collaborate with URAC on national telehealth standards development initiative

AMC Health to collaborate with URAC on national telehealth standards development initiative

AMC Health, a leading provider of 'real-time' patient management solutions has announced that it will collaborate with URAC on its national telehealth standards development initiative. [More]
UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

UTHealth scientists use new methods to explore naturally occurring 'knockout humans'

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston are helping to make precision medicine a reality by sequencing entire exomes of people to assess chronic disease risk and drug efficacy. The results of a study on this topic were published in Nature Genetics on Monday. [More]
New technologies for preventing preterm labor, inducing labor process heading to marketplace

New technologies for preventing preterm labor, inducing labor process heading to marketplace

Preventing preterm labor with light and inducing labor using a side effect-free drug are two new technologies based on Florida State University research that are heading to the marketplace. [More]
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