Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

Exposure to tobacco smoke, roadway air pollution can contribute to obesity

New research from Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) bolsters evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke and near-roadway air pollution contributes to the development of obesity. [More]
Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

Electrical stimulation technology can help SCI patients regain bladder control

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, paralysis is only a part of the major impact on quality of life. Often they also lose bladder control, which frequently causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. [More]
Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare gene mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels, reduced risk of heart attack

Rare mutations that shut down a single gene are linked to lower cholesterol levels and a 50 percent reduction in the risk of heart attack, according to new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Broad Institute at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard, and other institutions. [More]
Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

Estrogen plays key role in regulating blood pressure, LDL cholesterol levels

What makes some women more susceptible to heart disease than others? To help answer that question, researchers at Western University's Robarts Research Institute have identified that an estrogen receptor, previously shown to regulate blood pressure in women, also plays an important role in regulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. [More]
Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

A gene known to play a major role in constricting blood vessels also appears to be a major player in the aberrant blood vessel growth that can destroy the vision of premature babies. [More]
Effective health interventions needed to increase life expectancy of older people

Effective health interventions needed to increase life expectancy of older people

A major new Series on health and ageing, published in "The Lancet", warns that unless health systems find effective strategies to address the problems faced by an ageing world population, the growing burden of chronic disease will greatly affect the quality of life of older people. As people across the world live longer, soaring levels of chronic illness and diminished wellbeing are poised to become a major global public health challenge. [More]
Only one in every two young adults with hypertension receives advice on how to lower blood pressure

Only one in every two young adults with hypertension receives advice on how to lower blood pressure

Far too many "teachable moments" are lost in a doctor's office during which young adults with hypertension could have learned how to reduce their blood pressure. In fact, only one in every two hypertensive young Americans does in fact receive such advice and guidance from a healthcare provider within a year from being diagnosed, says Heather M. Johnson of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in the US. [More]
Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean, Central and South America continues to spread

Fall in the United States means residents in most of the country will see fewer mosquitoes and less risk of the diseases they spread. However, the chikungunya outbreak in Caribbean and Central and South American countries continues to spread with no sign of slowing down. Experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the painful mosquito-borne disease will likely continue to infect travelers to the region during the rest of this year and beyond. [More]
D-LIVER project aims to help patients with chronic liver disease

D-LIVER project aims to help patients with chronic liver disease

A European ICT for Health project aims to improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver disease, by developing a remote support system to monitor their condition at home. [More]
IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a small protein with a big role in lowering plasma glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity. [More]
FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) as a treatment for people with advanced or metastatic gastric (stomach) or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma whose cancer has progressed on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy. [More]
New mobile wireless system for monitoring elderly people at homes

New mobile wireless system for monitoring elderly people at homes

Fraunhofer FIT demonstrates a mobile wireless system that monitors the health of elderly people in their own homes, using miniature sensors. Besides non-invasive sensors this platform integrates technology to take a blood sample and to determine specific markers in the patient's blood. [More]
Researchers find independent predictors of end stage renal disease in teens

Researchers find independent predictors of end stage renal disease in teens

Researchers at ├Ârebro University found that high blood pressure, being overweight, elevation of a blood marker indicating inflammation, or the presence of protein in the urine in otherwise healthy teenage males were all independent predictors of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in later in life. [More]
Krembil researchers potentially discover major cause of dementia

Krembil researchers potentially discover major cause of dementia

Researchers at the Krembil Neuroscience Centre have potentially discovered a major cause of dementia. In this type of dementia, there is damage to the white matter (nerve fibres) of the brain apparent on computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of older individuals. [More]
SCN clock isn't necessary to align body rhythms with light-dark cycle, study reveals

SCN clock isn't necessary to align body rhythms with light-dark cycle, study reveals

Circadian clocks regulate functions ranging from alertness and reaction time to body temperature and blood pressure. New research published in the November 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal further adds to our understanding of the circadian rhythm by suggesting that the suprachiasmaticus nucleus (SCN) clock, a tiny region of the hypothalamus considered to be the body's "master" timekeeper, is not necessary to align body rhythms with the light-dark cycle. [More]
Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

Hospital bed positioning can affect outcomes of stroke patients

During the first 24 hours after a stroke, attention to detail --such as hospital bed positioning -- is critical to patient outcomes. [More]
University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

Nearly 1.8 million people in Germany suffer from atrial fibrillation. This is the most common and clinically significant form of heart rhythm disorder. Shortness of breath, a sudden sense of dizziness, a feeling of pressure in the chest, and palpitations or thumping of the heart so extreme it can be felt beating rapidly and irregularly - this is how many patients describe their first episode of atrial fibrillation. [More]
International Aspirin Foundation introduces two biennial awards

International Aspirin Foundation introduces two biennial awards

In celebration of the 40th anniversary of the formation of The International Aspirin Foundation, we are delighted to announce the introduction of two biennial awards; a Senior Science Award and a Young Investigator Award. [More]
Study details crucial role of culture in achieving better health

Study details crucial role of culture in achieving better health

The systematic neglect of culture is the single biggest barrier to advancing the highest attainable standard of health worldwide, say the authors of a major new report on culture and health, led by Professor David Napier, a leading medical anthropologist from University College London (UCL), UK, and published in The Lancet. [More]
Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Mediterranean-style diets, physical activity can lower risk of first-time stroke

Eating Mediterranean or DASH-style diets, regularly engaging in physical activity and keeping your blood pressure under control can lower your risk of a first-time stroke, according to updated AHA/ASA guideline published in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. [More]