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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Omeros plans to file patent infringement lawsuit against Par

Omeros plans to file patent infringement lawsuit against Par

Omeros Corporation today, in response to investor questions, announced that it plans to file a patent infringement lawsuit against Par Pharmaceutical, Inc. and its subsidiary, Par Sterile Products, LLC in response to the Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) filed by Par seeking FDA approval to market a generic version of Omeros' commercial drug Omidria (phenylephrine and ketorolac injection) 1%/0.3%. [More]
Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

Unituxin (dinutuximab) granted EC Marketing Authorisation for treatment of childhood neuroblastoma

United Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the European Commission (EC) has granted Marketing Authorisation for Unituxin (dinutuximab) for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma in patients aged 12 months to 17 years, who have previously received induction chemotherapy and achieved at least a partial response, followed by myeloablative therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). [More]
UT Arlington, UNTHSC researchers develop user-friendly system alerts for people with sleep apnea

UT Arlington, UNTHSC researchers develop user-friendly system alerts for people with sleep apnea

Masks worn by those with sleep apnea can leak at night and be so uncomfortable that they often drive users away from treatment. But a new system being developed by researchers at UNT Health Science Center and The University of Texas at Arlington could make it easier for the estimated 18 million people with sleep apnea to get a good night's rest. [More]
Women's Medicine Collaborative awarded NIH grant to study link between placenta and sleep abnormalities

Women's Medicine Collaborative awarded NIH grant to study link between placenta and sleep abnormalities

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $2.7 million to the Women's Medicine Collaborative to study the placenta and its function to determine whether changes in the placenta are linked to sleep abnormalities. [More]
MGH papers reveal the way anesthetics affect brains of older patients and children

MGH papers reveal the way anesthetics affect brains of older patients and children

Recent Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigations into the neurobiology underlying the effects of general anesthesia have begun to reveal the ways different anesthetic agents alter specific aspects of the brain's electrical signals, reflected by EEG (electroencephalogram) signatures. While those studies have provided information that may lead to improved techniques for monitoring the consciousness of patients receiving general anesthesia, until now they have been conducted in relatively young adult patients. [More]
Opioids produced by yeast; revealing the potential for cheaper pain relief

Opioids produced by yeast; revealing the potential for cheaper pain relief

Researchers at Stanford University have genetically engineered yeast so it produces hydrocodone, a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic used in the United States for relief of moderate to severe pain. [More]
USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

USC kidney researcher named recipient of ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award

Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California kidney researcher Janos Peti-Peterdi is the 2015 recipient of the ASN-AHA Young Investigator Award. [More]
Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight, preterm birth increase schizophrenia risk in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

Low birth weight and preterm birth appear to increase the risk of schizophrenia among individuals with a genetic condition called the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a new study from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) shows. [More]
Penn Medicine experts say that health care innovation is about testing new ideas to promote better patient care

Penn Medicine experts say that health care innovation is about testing new ideas to promote better patient care

Health care has much to learn from innovative high-tech companies, but not in the way most people think, according to a Perspective published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and authored by innovation experts from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Innovation, they say, can most effectively achieve meaningful outcomes by testing many new ideas quickly, cheaply, and contextually. [More]
Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

Johns Hopkins study finds substantial increase in rate, costs of hospitalizations for pediatric pulmonary hypertension

A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. [More]
New research could help develop precision medicine for primary aldosteronism

New research could help develop precision medicine for primary aldosteronism

Each of your kidneys wears a little yellow cap that helps keep your blood pressure in check, and much more. But in some people, it starts running amok, pumping out a hormone that sends blood pressure sky-high. [More]
Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

It is a paradox: Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and thus with oxygen. It has long been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process, but the exact mechanism has remained unclear. [More]
New study reveals role of hydrogen sulfide gas in autoimmune disease

New study reveals role of hydrogen sulfide gas in autoimmune disease

The immune system not only responds to infections and other potentially problematic abnormalities in the body, it also contains a built-in brake in the form of regulatory T cells, or Tregs. Tregs ensure that inflammatory responses don't get out of hand and do damage. In autoimmune diseases, sometimes these Treg cells don't act as they should. [More]
New Johns Hopkins study shows hepatitis C infection may spell heart trouble

New Johns Hopkins study shows hepatitis C infection may spell heart trouble

People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble. [More]
Scientists decipher new molecular signaling path that prompts protein degradation in muscle

Scientists decipher new molecular signaling path that prompts protein degradation in muscle

Patients in advanced states of myocardial insufficiency generally lose their muscle mass and muscle strength. Indeed a fact that until now has negatively impacted the clinical course of the disease and that has resulted in poor prognoses for patients. Such pathological muscle loss impacts the skeletal muscles in particular. [More]
FDA accepts sNDA to review Brintellix clinical trial data for treatment of major depressive disorder

FDA accepts sNDA to review Brintellix clinical trial data for treatment of major depressive disorder

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (Takeda) and H. Lundbeck A/S (Lundbeck) announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for review to add clinical data regarding the effect of Brintellix (vortioxetine) on certain aspects of cognitive function in adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) to the current product label. [More]
Novel treatment target found for RV failure in PAH

Novel treatment target found for RV failure in PAH

Researchers have identified a molecular pathway by which downregulation of microRNA-126 contributes to right ventricular failure in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
Scientists develop technique to identify Viagra and other hidden ingredients in dietary supplements

Scientists develop technique to identify Viagra and other hidden ingredients in dietary supplements

To lose weight, boost energy or soothe nerves, many consumers turn to dietary supplements. But some of these products contain undeclared substances. To protect consumers from taking something without their knowledge, scientists have developed a technique to determine what secret ingredients could be lurking in these supplements. [More]
Inflammation from diets deficient in nutrients contribute to weight despite intake of macronutrients

Inflammation from diets deficient in nutrients contribute to weight despite intake of macronutrients

If you are watching what you eat, working out, and still not seeing improvements in your cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, etc., here's some hope. A new report appearing in the August 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that inflammation induced by deficiencies in vitamins and minerals might be the culprit. [More]
Implanted biochemical sensor could allow doctors to better monitor, adjust cancer treatments

Implanted biochemical sensor could allow doctors to better monitor, adjust cancer treatments

In the battle against cancer, which kills nearly 8 million people worldwide each year, doctors have in their arsenal many powerful weapons, including various forms of chemotherapy and radiation. What they lack, however, is good reconnaissance — a reliable way to obtain real-time data about how well a particular therapy is working for any given patient. [More]
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