Blood Pressure News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Pressure News and Research

Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

Research provides new molecular insight into heart failure

More than 5 million people in the United States suffer from heart failure, according to the American Heart Association. Less than half of those with heart failure live five years after diagnosis. [More]
10 million of us lack sunshine vitamin

10 million of us lack sunshine vitamin

Health pioneers BetterYou have welcomed the views of Nutritionist Marilyn Glenville, that ‘oil based supplements can help you get your recommended dose of vitamin D’. [More]
Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Simple blood test could help predict emergence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women

Pre-eclampsia is a serious illness associated with pregnancy, which develops after twenty weeks and is associated with defective ingrowing of the placenta within the mother. The dangerous illness is both the second most frequent cause of death in pregnant women, and the reason for severe complications for mother and child, especially during premature births. [More]
CNIC researchers identify how two proteins control heart growth and adaptation to hypertension

CNIC researchers identify how two proteins control heart growth and adaptation to hypertension

Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III have identified how two proteins control the growth of the heart and its adaptation to high blood pressure (hypertension). [More]
Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

Cardiovascular considerations crucial for CML TKI patients

A review of BCR–ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors highlights the need to consider cardiovascular adverse event risk profiles when prescribing for patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia. [More]
Biomedical innovation in the UK: an interview with Zahid Latif

Biomedical innovation in the UK: an interview with Zahid Latif

The biomedical research base is one of the UK's strengths; over 1500 companies in the Pharmaceuticals and biotechnology area are established in the UK employing over 70,000. [More]
Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Bariatric surgery prior to knee replacement benefits morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis

Previous research studies have linked obesity to adverse outcomes and increased costs following total knee replacement surgery (TKR). A new, computer model-based evaluation appearing in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, supports bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients with end-stage osteoarthritis (loss of cartilage and joint pain, caused by aging and use) prior to TKR. [More]
Young blacks at three times greater risk of first stroke than white counterparts

Young blacks at three times greater risk of first stroke than white counterparts

A first-of-its-kind study found that young blacks, age 45, are at a three times greater risk of having a first stroke than their white counterparts. However, they may not be at a higher risk for the second stroke. [More]
Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Even though young African-Americans are at three times greater risk of a first stroke than their white counterparts, they may not be at a higher risk for a second stroke, according to a study published in the January 20, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the first of its kind to look at race and second stroke risk. [More]
Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

The study, of over 1300 adults with high blood pressure in the Cape Town area, compared text message reminders and interactive text messaging to a control group receiving standard care. The results appear online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers explore how Alzheimer's disease targets memory-related brain networks

Mayo Clinic researchers explore how Alzheimer's disease targets memory-related brain networks

Alzheimer's disease relentlessly targets large-scale brain networks that support the formation of new memories. However, it remains a mystery as to why the disease selectively targets memory-related brain networks and how this relates to misfolded proteins seen by pathologists at autopsy. [More]
Extended weekend sleep can counteract increased risk of diabetes associated with sleep loss

Extended weekend sleep can counteract increased risk of diabetes associated with sleep loss

Two consecutive nights of extended sleep, a typical weekend occurrence, appears to counteract the increased risk of diabetes associated with short-term sleep restriction during the work week, at least in lean, healthy, young men eating a controlled diet. [More]
New sites opened across the South West for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial

New sites opened across the South West for Alzheimer’s disease clinical trial

People with Alzheimer’s disease are helping with a ground-breaking government-funded trial but with new sites recently opened in the South West more people are being asked to take part in the study led by academics from the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge, Queen’s University Belfast and University College London, and hosted by North Bristol NHS Trust. [More]
Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

Mount Sinai Heart starts TANSNIP-PESA study to determine how workplace-based lifestyle intervention reduces CV risk

World-renowned cardiologist Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Director of Mount Sinai Heart and Physician-in-Chief of The Mount Sinai Hospital, is undertaking a three-year study, known as the TANSNIP-PESA study, to determine whether a workplace-based lifestyle intervention, accompanied by imaging data, will lead to a reduction in the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors related to lifestyle. [More]
New blood biomarkers could lead to better evaluation of treatment for patients with PAH

New blood biomarkers could lead to better evaluation of treatment for patients with PAH

New blood biomarkers reflecting vasoreactivity in lung blood vessels of patients with heart- and lung disease, can lead to simplified diagnostics and better evaluation of treatment for patients with the condition pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). [More]
USRDS report shows positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the U.S.

USRDS report shows positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the U.S.

The annual data report from the United States Renal Data System reveals both positive and negative trends in kidney disease in the U.S. [More]
PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

PK molecule could be a target for vascular complications linked to type 1 diabetes

In an article published ahead of print on November 24, 2015 in the journal Diabetes (available at http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db15-0930), researchers from the Medical University of South Carolina, the American University of Beirut, and Case Western Reserve University report that a molecule called pre-kallikrein (PK) could be a target for the vascular complications associated with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time. [More]
Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation enables some active duty service members battling post-traumatic stress disorder to reduce or even eliminate their psychotropic medication and get better control of their often-debilitating symptoms, researchers report in the journal Military Medicine. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement