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Blood Pressure is the force of circulating blood on the walls of the arteries. Blood pressure is taken using two measurements: systolic (measured when the heart beats, when blood pressure is at its highest) and diastolic (measured between heart beats, when blood pressure is at its lowest). Blood pressure is written with the systolic blood pressure first, followed by the diastolic blood pressure (for example 120/80).
New software that simulates interventions could spare young heart patients from surgery

New software that simulates interventions could spare young heart patients from surgery

Children with congenital heart defects often undergo a battery of strenuous examinations and interventions. In the EU CARDIOPROOF project, Fraunhofer researchers have developed software to simulate certain interventions in advance. [More]
Researchers identify potential new way of treating hypertension

Researchers identify potential new way of treating hypertension

Researchers eyeing first new anti-hypertensive drug treatment strategy in more than 15 years. [More]
Good blood microcirculation linked to longevity

Good blood microcirculation linked to longevity

Human longevity has been previously linked by researchers to genetic factors, calorie restriction, and certain life-style factors such as physical activity or the Mediterranean diet. [More]
Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi

Sepsis, according to the new clinical definition of sepsis, is organ dysfunction caused by the body’s dysregulated response to an infection. Sepsis is common, with about 20 million patients/year in the developed world. It can escalate to septic shock, which is a life-threatening condition with a mortality rate of about 40%. In fact, about every second someone in the world dies of sepsis. [More]
Low levels of diastolic blood pressure linked to heart damage risk

Low levels of diastolic blood pressure linked to heart damage risk

By analyzing medical records gathered over three decades on more than 11,000 Americans participating in a federally funded study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have more evidence that driving diastolic blood pressure too low is associated with damage to heart tissue. [More]
Induced deliveries following rupture of amniotic sac pose no increased risk to health of mother and infants

Induced deliveries following rupture of amniotic sac pose no increased risk to health of mother and infants

A new Tel Aviv University study has determined that natural, spontaneous deliveries and induced deliveries following the rupture of the amniotic sac in the mother share similar neonatal outcomes, contradicting common wisdom. [More]
UTHealth scientists discover powerful predictors of congestive heart failure

UTHealth scientists discover powerful predictors of congestive heart failure

A team of scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and Baylor College of Medicine, led by Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., Richard Gibbs, Ph.D., and Bing Yu, Ph.D., have identified powerful predictors of congestive heart failure, a major cause of hospitalization and death in the United States. [More]
Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease

Caution has been urged in the use of blood pressure lowering treatment for heart disease patients after a study in more than 22 000 patients with coronary artery disease found that too low blood pressure was associated with worse outcomes. The analysis from the CLARIFY registry is presented today at ESC Congress and published in The Lancet. [More]
Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Multi-purpose protein may offer clues for successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease

The tidal wave approaches. In the coming decades, Alzheimer's disease is projected to exact a devastating economic and emotional toll on society, with patient numbers in the US alone expected to reach 13.5 million by mid-century at a projected cost of over a trillion dollars. [More]
OPTICARE study shows year-long CR program makes heart patients happier, healthier and active

OPTICARE study shows year-long CR program makes heart patients happier, healthier and active

Enhanced cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs that include a year of group or personal lifestyle and fitness coaching did not improve cardiovascular risk scores more than a standard 3-month program in patients recovering from a heart attack. [More]
New study examines potential weight management benefits of sit-stand desks

New study examines potential weight management benefits of sit-stand desks

Alternating positions between standing and sitting while performing deskwork could make the difference in whether the thin red needle in your bathroom scale tilts to the left or the right of your goal weight. [More]
Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs

Integrating mental and physical healthcare leads to better clinical outcomes, lower costs

A major new study shows that delivering integrated mental and physical healthcare in team-based primary care settings at Intermountain Healthcare results in better clinical outcomes for patients, lower rates of healthcare utilization, and lower costs. [More]
Long-term exposure to combination of lower LDL-C and SBP can reduce cardiovascular risk

Long-term exposure to combination of lower LDL-C and SBP can reduce cardiovascular risk

Long-term exposure to the combination of even modestly lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) has the potential to "dramatically reduce" a person's lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new findings reported at ESC Congress 2016. [More]
Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions. [More]
Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Study: Low socioeconomic status linked to higher risk of second heart attack or stroke

Low socioeconomic status is associated with a higher risk of a second heart attack or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The study in nearly 30 000 patients with a prior heart attack found that the risk of a second event was 36% lower for those in the highest income quintile compared to the lowest and increased by 14% in divorced compared to married patients. [More]
Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Penn State dermatologist clarifies common myths about psoriasis

Psoriasis is a much-misunderstood disease, often kept under wraps by sufferers who want to hide their skin lesions. [More]
Study suggests microRNAs may connect inflammation with heart disease risk in obese people

Study suggests microRNAs may connect inflammation with heart disease risk in obese people

Inflammation likely plays a role in the increased risk of heart disease that comes with obesity, but scientists don't fully understand how obesity leads to heart disease. [More]
Anesthetic administered with nasal spray effective in preventing pain during dental treatment

Anesthetic administered with nasal spray effective in preventing pain during dental treatment

A fear of pain causes many people with dental phobias to avoid or delay needed treatment. In some cases, the injection of a numbing agent can be the most painful part of the visit. [More]
New drug delivery system slows and controls tumors not aiming for complete elimination

New drug delivery system slows and controls tumors not aiming for complete elimination

Researchers have created a new drug delivery system that could improve the effectiveness of an emerging concept in cancer treatment - to dramatically slow and control tumors on a long-term, sustained basis, not necessarily aiming for their complete elimination. [More]
Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

Arab uprising linked to detrimental effects on health and life expectancy in several countries

The Arab uprising in 2010 and subsequent wars in the eastern Mediterranean region have had serious detrimental effects on the health and life expectancy of the people living in many of the 22 countries in the region, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), published in The Lancet Global Health journal. [More]
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