Blood Vessel News and Research RSS Feed - Blood Vessel News and Research

Blood Vessels are tubes through which the blood circulates in the body. Blood vessels include a network of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins.
Scientists may have discovered new way to repair damaged tissue

Scientists may have discovered new way to repair damaged tissue

By transforming human scar cells into blood vessel cells, scientists at Houston Methodist may have discovered a new way to repair damaged tissue. The method, described in an upcoming issue of Circulation (early online), appeared to improve blood flow, oxygenation, and nutrition to areas in need. [More]
UCSD engineers propose new single-ventricle heart surgery for children

UCSD engineers propose new single-ventricle heart surgery for children

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, are proposing a new surgical intervention for children born with a single ventricle in their heart--instead of the usual two. The new approach would potentially reduce the number of surgeries the patients have to undergo in the first six months of life from two to just one. If successful, it would also create a more stable circuit for blood to flow from the heart to the lungs and the rest of the body within the first days and months of life. [More]
FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) as a treatment for people with advanced or metastatic gastric (stomach) or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma whose cancer has progressed on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy. [More]
New type of medical imaging technology could diagnose plaques

New type of medical imaging technology could diagnose plaques

Researchers are close to commercializing a new type of medical imaging technology that could diagnose cardiovascular disease by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser. [More]
Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers invent lab device that yields microscopic look at metastasis

Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a lab device to give cancer researchers an unprecedented microscopic look at metastasis, the complex way that tumor cells spread through the body, causing more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. By shedding light on precisely how tumor cells travel, the device could uncover new ways to keep cancer in check. [More]
UAlberta researchers discover link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

UAlberta researchers discover link between pulmonary hypertension, diabetes and cancer

A UAlberta team has discovered that a protein that plays a critical role in metabolism, the process by which the cell generates energy from foods, is important for the development of pulmonary hypertension, a deadly disease. [More]
University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

University Medical Center's first atrial fibrillation unit opens in Germany

Nearly 1.8 million people in Germany suffer from atrial fibrillation. This is the most common and clinically significant form of heart rhythm disorder. Shortness of breath, a sudden sense of dizziness, a feeling of pressure in the chest, and palpitations or thumping of the heart so extreme it can be felt beating rapidly and irregularly - this is how many patients describe their first episode of atrial fibrillation. [More]
Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

Game theory and the cancer ecosystem: an interview with Professor Pienta, Johns Hopkins

The classic description of game theory was described by the prisoner's dilemma, which is a situation in which two players have two options where the outcome depends on the simultaneous choice made by the other. [More]
New research suggests that TEM5 protein may be a good target for cancer therapy

New research suggests that TEM5 protein may be a good target for cancer therapy

Do blood vessels that feed tumors differ from other blood vessels? Fourteen years ago, experiments designed to answer that question led to the discovery of several genes that are more active in tumor-associated blood vessels than in normal blood vessels. New research now reveals the normal function of one of those genes and suggests it could be a good target for anticancer drug therapy. [More]
Preeclampsia study provides pathways for new therapeutic treatments

Preeclampsia study provides pathways for new therapeutic treatments

A team of researchers led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology has published findings that provide novel insight into the cause of preeclampsia, the leading cause of maternal and infant death worldwide, a discovery that could lead to the development of new therapeutic treatments. [More]
Monash University research explores long-term costs for two main causes of stroke

Monash University research explores long-term costs for two main causes of stroke

New data shows that healthcare and personal costs to support survivors of stroke remains high 10 years on. [More]
Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels in tumors, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies. [More]
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
New treatment strategy may improve repair process after heart attack

New treatment strategy may improve repair process after heart attack

In a study that could point the way toward a new strategy for treating patients after a heart attack, UCLA stem cell researchers led by associate professor of medicine (cardiology) and Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research member Dr. Arjun Deb have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart, known as fibroblasts, have the ability to become endothelial cells (the cells that form blood vessels). [More]
Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer. [More]
LaVision BioTec report on users of light sheet microscopy in the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

LaVision BioTec report on users of light sheet microscopy in the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on users of their Ultramicroscope Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscope system to aid the research of the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis under the supervision of Professor Vance Lemmon, the Walter G. Ross Distinguished Chair in Developmental Neuroscience & Professor of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami. [More]
Eye Co receives patent for new class of eye disease drugs

Eye Co receives patent for new class of eye disease drugs

Australian ocular technology company Eye Co Pty Ltd has achieved a key commercial milestone, with a patent granted protecting its new class of eye disease drugs throughout the high value European market. [More]
Multi-center study compares clinical performance of AAA procedures in virtual environment

Multi-center study compares clinical performance of AAA procedures in virtual environment

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center and Simbionix recently launched a multi-center, randomized study comparing the clinical performance of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) procedures with and without prior rehearsal in a virtual environment for physicians. [More]
New study on global burden of venous thromboembolism

New study on global burden of venous thromboembolism

A study on the global burden of venous thromboembolism—when a dangerous clot forms in a blood vessel—found that annual incidences range from 0.75 to 2.69 per 1,000 individuals in the population. [More]
Rockefeller University researchers gain new insight into how cholesterol processes in our body

Rockefeller University researchers gain new insight into how cholesterol processes in our body

In spite of its dangerous reputation, cholesterol is in fact an essential component of human cells. Manufactured by the cells themselves, it serves to stiffen the cell's membrane, helping to shape the cell and protect it. By mapping the structure of a key enzyme involved in cholesterol production, Rockefeller University researchers and a colleague in Italy have gained new insight into this complex molecular process. [More]