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Blood Vessels are tubes through which the blood circulates in the body. Blood vessels include a network of arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins.
Loyola among first health systems to offer absorbable stent to heart patients

Loyola among first health systems to offer absorbable stent to heart patients

Loyola Medicine will be among the first health systems in the country to offer heart patients a new stent that is absorbed by the body once it has served its purpose. [More]
Taking extra 1000 steps each day can improve health of children with type 1 diabetes

Taking extra 1000 steps each day can improve health of children with type 1 diabetes

Keeping count of daily steps and boosting physical activity can really pay off for children with type 1 diabetes, according to new research from the University of Adelaide and the Women's and Children's Hospital. [More]
Brain vessel diseases may contribute to Alzheimer's dementia

Brain vessel diseases may contribute to Alzheimer's dementia

While strokes are known to increase risk for dementia, much less is known about diseases of large and small blood vessels in the brain, separate from stroke, and how they relate to dementia. [More]
Study finds better way to evaluate operating skills of orthopaedic residents

Study finds better way to evaluate operating skills of orthopaedic residents

In a small study to determine the best way to assess the operating skills of would-be orthopaedic surgeons, Johns Hopkins researchers found that tracking the trainees’ performance on cadavers using step-by-step checklists and measures of general surgical skills works well but should be coupled with an equally rigorous system for tracking errors. [More]
Breakthrough research could lead to new drugs to improve heart attack outcomes

Breakthrough research could lead to new drugs to improve heart attack outcomes

A research advance from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Stanford University could lead to new drugs that minimize the damage caused by heart attacks. [More]
ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

ADAPT technique offers promising outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots

In an article published online April 16, 2016 by the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery, investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina report promising 90-day outcomes for stroke patients with large-vessel clots who underwent thrombectomy or clot removal using the direct-aspiration, first pass technique. [More]
Therapeutic stem cells exit bloodstream in different way than previously thought

Therapeutic stem cells exit bloodstream in different way than previously thought

Researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered that therapeutic stem cells exit the bloodstream in a different manner than was previously thought. This process, dubbed angiopellosis by the researchers, has implications for improving our understanding of not only intravenous stem cell therapies, but also metastatic cancers. [More]
New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

New non-invasive method may help treat people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. [More]
Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists explain how engineered anthrax toxin proteins could help eliminate cancerous tumors

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute all parts of the National Institutes of Health, describe how combining engineered anthrax toxin proteins and existing chemotherapy drugs could potentially yield a therapy to reduce or eliminate cancerous tumors. [More]
Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

New devices called stent retrievers, which effectively reverse strokes, have revolutionized the treatment of certain stroke patients, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics. [More]
Unseen health risks of aortic stenosis: an interview with Dr Shelley Rahman Haley

Unseen health risks of aortic stenosis: an interview with Dr Shelley Rahman Haley

Aortic stenosis means narrowing of the aortic valve, which is the out flow valve from the left ventricle, the pumping chamber of the heart. This is the valve which opens to allow blood to flood out of the heart and all-round the body. [More]
Pipeline Embolization Device safe, effective for treatment of complex brain aneurysms

Pipeline Embolization Device safe, effective for treatment of complex brain aneurysms

A recently introduced technology called the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) can provide a less-invasive approach for difficult-to-treat aneurysms of the arteries supplying blood to the front of the brain, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Breast cancer cells use new signaling pathway to cope with lack of oxygen levels inside tumors

Breast cancer cells use new signaling pathway to cope with lack of oxygen levels inside tumors

Researchers have identified a new signaling pathway that helps cancer cells cope with the lack of oxygen found inside tumors. These are the results of a study published in Nature Cell Biology on June 20, and led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, the University of Toronto, Harvard Medical School and Oxford University. [More]
AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

AF patients at risk for stroke mostly treated with aspirin-only prescription instead of blood thinners

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine report that more than 1 in 3 atrial fibrillation (AF) patients at intermediate to high risk for stroke are treated with aspirin alone, despite previous data showing this therapy to be inferior to blood thinners. [More]
New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

New blood test could help predict severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that rising blood levels of a protein called hematoma derived growth factor (HDGF) are linked to the increasing severity of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a form of damaging high blood pressure in the lungs. [More]
Obese teenagers more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age

Obese teenagers more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age

Research that followed more than 1.6 million Swedish men from adolescence onwards between 1968 and 2005 has shown that those who were overweight as teenagers were more likely to develop heart failure in early middle age. [More]
Darapladib drug can protect against vision loss in diabetic patients

Darapladib drug can protect against vision loss in diabetic patients

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast and University College London have discovered that a drug, originally developed to treat cardiovascular disease, has the potential to reduce diabetes related blindness. [More]
ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

ACCORDION study shows lowering blood glucose can reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy

People with type 2 diabetes who intensively controlled their blood sugar level during the landmark Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) Trial Eye Study were found to have cut their risk of diabetic retinopathy in half in a follow-up analysis conducted four years after stopping intensive therapy. [More]
Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Human stem cells restore motor function in chronic stroke patients

Injecting modified, human, adult stem cells directly into the brains of chronic stroke patients proved not only safe but effective in restoring motor function, according to the findings of a small clinical trial led by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators. [More]
Multiple cell and gene therapies can enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with MI

Multiple cell and gene therapies can enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with MI

Researchers at the University of Utah compared the therapeutic potential of umbilical cord-derived sub-epithelial cells (UC-SECs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) -- all derived from human tissue -- along with genes (S100a1 and SDF-1a) and growth factor (VEGF165) to evaluate how injected biologics might enhance cardiac function in mice modeled with myocardial infarction (MI; commonly referred to as heart attack). [More]
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