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Obesity genes promote all-round increases in postnatal growth

Obesity genes promote all-round increases in postnatal growth

Genetic variants that increase susceptibility to obesity are associated with increased gains in lean mass, as well as fat mass, during early childhood, meta-analysis findings indicate. [More]
Physical health management below par in schizophrenia patients

Physical health management below par in schizophrenia patients

The diagnosis and treatment of physical ailments in patients with schizophrenia falls below acceptable standards, shows a national audit of patients in England and Wales. [More]
Oats play important role in human health

Oats play important role in human health

According to a new, wide-reaching collection of scientific reviews published in the October 2014 supplement issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, oats may play an important role in improving satiety, diet quality and digestive, cardiovascular and general metabolic health. [More]
Study: Obese youths with ALL have worse outcomes than lean counterparts

Study: Obese youths with ALL have worse outcomes than lean counterparts

Obese youths with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have worse outcomes than their lean counterparts. To find out why, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles studied patients who were obese at the time of their diagnosis with ALL to determine if body mass index (BMI) impacted response to initial chemotherapy. This response to initial chemotherapy (or induction therapy) is measured by the absence of leukemia cells in the bone marrow. [More]
Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Mindfulness improves cardiovascular health

Pay attention to the implication of these new research results: People who pay more attention to their feelings and experiences tend to have better cardiovascular health. [More]
Cardiometabolic health intervention urged for schizophrenia patients

Cardiometabolic health intervention urged for schizophrenia patients

Research shows high cardiometabolic risk, particularly increased dyslipidaemia and smoking, but little related medical treatment in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. [More]
Viewpoints: Health law opposition not propelling GOP; keep politics out of the fight against Ebola

Viewpoints: Health law opposition not propelling GOP; keep politics out of the fight against Ebola

As recently as April, Obamacare was going to be the silver bullet for Republicans in this year's midterm elections. The leader of conservative advocacy group Americans for Prosperity said his plan was to make Obamacare "the No. 1 issue in the country." Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., declared that the law would be "a huge disaster in 2014" and the deciding factor in November. Well, that was then. Now, three weeks from Election Day, some GOP challengers trying to knock off Democratic incumbent senators have scaled back their anti-Obamacare ads in favor of new targets such as the economy and national security (10/13). [More]
Aesthetic procedures following bariatric surgeries may help improve long-term results

Aesthetic procedures following bariatric surgeries may help improve long-term results

Patients who have plastic surgery to reshape their bodies after bariatric procedures are able to maintain "significantly greater" weight loss than those who do not have surgery, according to a new study by Henry Ford Hospital researchers. [More]
Obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver

Obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver

Using a recently developed biomarker of aging known as an epigenetic clock, UCLA researchers working closely with a German team of investigators have found for the first time that obesity greatly accelerates aging of the liver. This finding could explain the early onset of many age-related diseases, including liver cancer, in obese subjects [More]
Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study published in the October 8, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Increased risk of premature death associated with higher BMI similar for African Americans, whites

Increased risk of premature death associated with higher BMI similar for African Americans, whites

A study from American Cancer Society researchers finds the increased risk of premature death associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) is similar for African Americans and whites, in contrast to previous, smaller studies that indicated the association may be weaker for African Americans. [More]
Tongue fat, size linked to obstructive sleep apnea in obese adults

Tongue fat, size linked to obstructive sleep apnea in obese adults

Obesity is a risk factor for many health problems, but a new Penn Medicine study published this month in the journal Sleep suggests having a larger tongue with increased levels of fat may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in obese adults. [More]
New study suggests that family meals may be protective against obesity

New study suggests that family meals may be protective against obesity

Increasing rates of adolescent obesity and the likelihood that obesity will carry forward into adulthood, have led to various preventive initiatives. It has been suggested that family meals, which tend to include fruits, vegetables, calcium, and whole grains, could be protective against obesity. [More]
Nutritional supplement boosts growth in short, lean children

Nutritional supplement boosts growth in short, lean children

A balanced nutritional supplement promotes height and weight gain in lean prepubertal children with idiopathic short stature, show the findings of a randomised trial. [More]
Genetic susceptibility to psychosocial stress can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

Genetic susceptibility to psychosocial stress can increase risk of cardiovascular disease

A new genetic finding from Duke Medicine suggests that some people who are prone to hostility, anxiety and depression might also be hard-wired to gain weight when exposed to chronic stress, leading to diabetes and heart disease. [More]
Women who accept their imperfections may experience more positive body image

Women who accept their imperfections may experience more positive body image

Women who accept and tolerate their imperfections appear to have a more positive body image despite their body mass index (BMI) and are better able to handle personal disappointments and setbacks in their daily lives. [More]
EnteroMedics' CE Mark for Maestro System expanded to include management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus

EnteroMedics' CE Mark for Maestro System expanded to include management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus

EnteroMedics Inc., the developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases and other gastrointestinal disorders, today announced that its CE Mark for the Maestro Rechargeable (RC) System for obesity was expanded to include the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus through improved glycemic control. [More]
Autistic children more sedentary than typically-developing peers

Autistic children more sedentary than typically-developing peers

A new Oregon State University study of children with autism found that they are more sedentary than their typically-developing peers, averaging 50 minutes less a day of moderate physical activity and 70 minutes more each day sitting. [More]
Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer

Taller individuals are less likely to develop esophageal cancer and it's precursor, Barrett's esophagus, according to a new study1 in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Weight cycling linked to relapse-prone bipolar course

Weight cycling linked to relapse-prone bipolar course

Patients with bipolar disorder are more likely than healthy controls to have a history of weight cycling, which in turn is associated with an increased likelihood of manic and depressive episodes, researchers report. [More]