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Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Study: Depressed patients three times more likely to experience frequent chest pain

Depressed patients have more frequent chest pain even in the absence of coronary artery disease, according to results from the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Salim Hayek, a cardiologist at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, US. [More]
Prolonged television watching associated with twice the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism

Prolonged television watching associated with twice the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism

Prolonged television watchers have a higher risk of fatal pulmonary embolism, a condition associated with long haul flights, reveals research presented at ESC Congress today by Mr Toru Shirakawa, public health research fellow in the Department of Social Medicine at Osaka University in Japan. [More]
Depression, blood pressure predict harmful vascular events in patients with heart disease, diabetes or stroke

Depression, blood pressure predict harmful vascular events in patients with heart disease, diabetes or stroke

Depressive symptoms and extremes of blood pressure predict the highest rates of harmful vascular events in patients with existing heart disease, diabetes or stroke, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Bhautesh Jani, clinical academic fellow in the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, UK. [More]
Study shows food craving may be hard-wired into the brain of overweight patients

Study shows food craving may be hard-wired into the brain of overweight patients

An international group of researchers have found that food craving activates different brain networks between obese and normal weight patients. [More]
Close and supportive friendships in adolescence linked to better health in early adulthood

Close and supportive friendships in adolescence linked to better health in early adulthood

Teens are often warned to beware the undue influence of peer pressure, but new research suggests that following the pack in adolescence may have some unexpected benefits for physical health in early adulthood. [More]
Midday naps linked to reduced blood pressure levels, fewer antihypertensive medications

Midday naps linked to reduced blood pressure levels, fewer antihypertensive medications

Midday naps are associated with reduced blood pressure levels and prescription of fewer antihypertensive medications, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Manolis Kallistratos, a cardiologist at Asklepieion Voula General Hospital in Athens, Greece. [More]
Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Drinking coffee increases risk of cardiovascular events in young adults with mild hypertension

Coffee drinking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events (mainly heart attacks) in young adults (18-45) with mild hypertension, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos, a cardiologist at Hospital of San Daniele del Friuli in Udine, Italy. [More]
Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

Key modifiable Alzheimer’s risk factors pinpointed

A meta-analysis has identified the key modifiable factors associated with an increased or decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. [More]
Obesity raises Lynch syndrome CRC risk

Obesity raises Lynch syndrome CRC risk

Obesity increases the risk of colorectal cancer in patients with Lynch syndrome, research indicates, but daily aspirin use may combat this excess risk. [More]
New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

New Pitt analysis reveals causes of stillbirth among obese women

Obese women are nearly twice as likely as their lean counterparts to have stillborn babies for several specific, potentially preventable medical reasons, a new University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis reveals. [More]
High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

High cardiorespiratory fitness levels reduce risk of arrhythmia recurrence in obese atrial fibrillation patients

Obese atrial fibrillation patients have a lower chance of arrhythmia recurrence if they have high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, and risk continues to decline as exercise capacity increases as part of treatment, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
SLUCare cardiac surgeon aims to connect underserved population in St. Louis region with health care services

SLUCare cardiac surgeon aims to connect underserved population in St. Louis region with health care services

A new project spearheaded by a Saint Louis University cardiac surgeon is aiming to connect an underserved population with health care services in the St. Louis region. [More]
NIH-funded Growing Resilience project to evaluate health impacts of food gardens

NIH-funded Growing Resilience project to evaluate health impacts of food gardens

With a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, University of Wyoming and Wind River Indian Reservation partners will evaluate the health impacts of food gardens with 100 Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho families who would like to try home gardening. [More]
Urologists report success in treating bladder issues, pelvic pain through neuromodulation technique

Urologists report success in treating bladder issues, pelvic pain through neuromodulation technique

Millions of people suffer from bladder dysfunction, including about 30 million in the U.S. One in seven women experience chronic pelvic pain. These are not only health issues, but quality of life issues. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Maximum weight gain seen in obese smokers, heavy smokers after smoking cessation

Maximum weight gain seen in obese smokers, heavy smokers after smoking cessation

For smokers, the number of cigarettes smoked per day and current body mass index are predictive of changes in weight after quitting smoking, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
New VA study demonstrates cardiovascular benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

New VA study demonstrates cardiovascular benefits of testosterone replacement therapy

A Veterans Affairs database study of more than 83,000 patients found that men whose low testosterone was restored to normal through gels, patches, or injections had a lower risk of heart attack, stroke, or death from any cause, versus similar men who were not treated. [More]
Meta-analysis confirms oral contraceptives reduce endometrial cancer risk

Meta-analysis confirms oral contraceptives reduce endometrial cancer risk

Oral contraceptive use protects against endometrial cancer, with effects persisting for decades after cessation of use, shows a meta-analysis of individual patient data published in The Lancet Oncology. [More]
Shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy better for women with early stage breast cancer

Shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy better for women with early stage breast cancer

Women who receive a shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy for early stage disease experience less toxicity and improved quality of life compared to those who undergo a longer course of treatment, researchers report from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
New research shows gastric bypass surgery lowers alcohol tolerance in women

New research shows gastric bypass surgery lowers alcohol tolerance in women

Women who have gastric bypass surgery to lose weight should keep a close eye on their alcohol consumption, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
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