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School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

School-based obesity prevention efforts may influence weight status of parents

Parents of children involved in an elementary school-based community intervention to prevent obesity appear to share in its health benefits. A new analysis of Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart Play Hard shows an association between being exposed to the intervention as a parent and a modest decrease in body mass index (BMI) compared to parents in two similar control communities. [More]
Multifaceted intervention helps bipolar disorder patients lose weight

Multifaceted intervention helps bipolar disorder patients lose weight

An Integrated Risk Reduction Intervention can help overweight and obese patients with bipolar disorder to reduce their body mass index, US researchers report. [More]
New evidence shows how personality affects health and wellbeing

New evidence shows how personality affects health and wellbeing

Researchers have found new evidence that explains how some aspects of our personality may affect our health and wellbeing, supporting long-observed associations between aspects of human character, physical health and longevity. [More]
New study finds that poor sleep may lead to dementia

New study finds that poor sleep may lead to dementia

People who have sleep apnea or spend less time in deep sleep may be more likely to have changes in the brain that are associated with dementia, according to a new study published in the December 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Standardized set of measurements may help identify malnutrition among young children

Standardized set of measurements may help identify malnutrition among young children

Using a standardized set of measurements will help health professionals more accurately diagnose malnutrition among children ages 1 month to 18 years, as well as improve their treatment, according to a new joint statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. [More]
Weight-loss surgery may reduce lower urinary tract symptoms

Weight-loss surgery may reduce lower urinary tract symptoms

Metabolic syndrome is linked with an increased frequency and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms, but weight loss surgery may lessen these symptoms. The findings, which come from two studies published in BJU International, indicate that urinary problems may be added to the list of issues that can improve with efforts that address altered metabolism. [More]
Endocrinologist examines benefits and harms of testosterone therapy

Endocrinologist examines benefits and harms of testosterone therapy

An article in the latest edition of Australian Prescriber looks at the prescribing of testosterone, often used for ‘male menopause’ symptoms such as reduced energy, poor concentration and increased body fat. Over the past decade there has been a steep rise in the amount of testosterone dispensed in Australia and globally. [More]
Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

Meniscal surgery may increase risk of osteoarthritis, cartilage loss

A popular surgery to repair meniscal tears may increase the risk of osteoarthritis and cartilage loss in some patients, according to research presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. The findings show that the decision for surgery requires careful consideration in order to avoid accelerated disease onset, researchers said. [More]
People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife experience cognitive problems later

People diagnosed with diabetes in midlife are more likely to experience significant memory and cognitive problems during the next 20 years than those with healthy blood sugar levels, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
Occupational sitting tied to increased likelihood of obesity in women

Occupational sitting tied to increased likelihood of obesity in women

Occupational sitting is associated with an increased likelihood of obesity, especially among black women, independent of occupational and leisure time physical activity, finds a new study from the School of Medicine and the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
Inhibin B plus baseline LH levels aids hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis in boys

Inhibin B plus baseline LH levels aids hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosis in boys

Researchers recommend measuring inhibin B concentration in combination with basal luteinising hormone as a first-line test to discover the underlying cause of delayed puberty in boys. [More]
Persistent eosinophilia common in COPD

Persistent eosinophilia common in COPD

More than one-third of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease have persistent eosinophilia, researchers report in the European Respiratory Journal. [More]
Researchers use EHRs to uncover hidden drug benefits

Researchers use EHRs to uncover hidden drug benefits

With research and development costs for many drugs reaching well into the billions, pharmaceutical companies want more than ever to determine whether their drugs already at market have any hidden therapeutic benefits that could warrant putting additional indications on the label and increase production. [More]
Quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 attributed to increasing BMI, say researchers

Quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 attributed to increasing BMI, say researchers

Based on the results, the researchers led by Dr Melina Arnold from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, estimate that a quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 (118 000 cases) were attributable to the rising average body mass index (BMI) in the population since 1982, and were therefore "realistically avoidable". [More]
Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

Plaque buildup in the arteries associated with mild cognitive impairment

In a study of nearly 2,000 adults, researchers found that a buildup of plaque in the body's major arteries was associated with mild cognitive impairment. Results of the study conducted at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center will be presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. [More]
People with sleep apnea have lower peak oxygen uptake during aerobic activity

People with sleep apnea have lower peak oxygen uptake during aerobic activity

People with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea may have an intrinsic inability to burn high amounts of oxygen during strenuous aerobic exercise, according to a new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. [More]
Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

A study conducted by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health shows that obesity costs the U.S. $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace --more than 9% of all absenteeism costs. [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Children of women who work full time get fewer hours of sleep, have higher BMIs

Children of women who work full time get fewer hours of sleep, have higher BMIs

The majority of preschoolers may not be getting the amount of sleep they need each night, placing them at higher risk of being overweight or obese within a year, according to a new study. [More]
One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]