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Stand-biased classroom environments can have significant effect on BMI percentile of students

Stand-biased classroom environments can have significant effect on BMI percentile of students

Changing a classroom from standard desks to standing desks, has a significant effect on the body mass index (BMI) percentile of students, according to a study co-led by University of Louisville School of Public Health and Information Sciences researcher Monica Wendel, Dr.P.H., M.A., and her Texas A&M University collaborators. [More]
REVERSE II trial validates HERDOO2 rule to help spot women who can discontinue anticoagulants

REVERSE II trial validates HERDOO2 rule to help spot women who can discontinue anticoagulants

A clinical decision rule (CDR) that can be applied to women after a first, unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) was able to identify those with a low-risk of recurrence who could safely discontinue anticoagulant therapy, researchers reported at ESC Congress 2016. [More]
School intervention costing less than USD $0.20 per student stops increase in BMI

School intervention costing less than USD $0.20 per student stops increase in BMI

A school intervention costing less than 20 cents per child has stopped unhealthy weight gain. The randomised study is presented at ESC Congress 2016 today by Ms Daniela Schneid Schuh, a nutritionist at the Institute of Cardiology of Rio Grande do Sul in Porto Alegre, Brazil. [More]
Study reveals disadvantaged neighborhood puts teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese

Study reveals disadvantaged neighborhood puts teens at increased risk for being overweight or obese

A new Kaiser Permanente study found an increased risk for becoming overweight or obese among normal-weight 18-year-olds who lived in neighborhoods with lower education or income levels. [More]
Diabetes drug linked to decreased weight gain in children with autism spectrum disorder

Diabetes drug linked to decreased weight gain in children with autism spectrum disorder

The diabetes medication metformin hydrochloride was associated with decreased weight gain in a small clinical trial of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder who were taking atypical antipsychotics to treat symptoms of irritability and agitation, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. [More]
Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism

Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism

Scientists have long known that infants born to women who are obese show higher risks of obesity, but they don't fully understand what boosts those risks. [More]
Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers

A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease. [More]
Improvements in modifiable risk factors could help avoid preterm births

Improvements in modifiable risk factors could help avoid preterm births

A significant portion of preterm births might be avoided by reducing or eliminating three major risk factors. [More]
Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes

Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University found similar rates of obesity and high blood pressure readings in student-athletes as would be expected in the general adolescent population, which may suggest that participation in athletics does not protect against these conditions. [More]
Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer’s

Healthy BMI, exercise and diet can lower abnormal protein build-ups linked to Alzheimer’s

A study by researchers at UCLA's Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior has found that a healthy diet, regular physical activity and a normal body mass index can reduce the incidence of protein build-ups that are associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

Increased parental longevity linked to lower risk of cardiovascular conditions in offspring

In middle aged populations, the risks of cardiovascular conditions are progressively lower the longer a person's parents lived past 69 years old, according to a study of 186,000 participants using a voluntary database published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Kids who eat government-funded school meals at increased risk of being overweight

Kids who eat government-funded school meals at increased risk of being overweight

Government-funded school meals are putting financially vulnerable children at risk of being overweight, a Virginia Tech researcher has found. [More]
Study finds high rates of increasing obesity in patients with history of cancer

Study finds high rates of increasing obesity in patients with history of cancer

A study at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health showed that obesity was more prevalent in patients with a history of cancer than in the general population, and survivors of colorectal and breast cancers were particularly affected. [More]
Higher socioeconomic status linked to lower ovarian cancer risk in African American women

Higher socioeconomic status linked to lower ovarian cancer risk in African American women

Higher socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with lower ovarian cancer risk in African American women, according to the results of a study by investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and elsewhere reported online August 3 by the American Journal of Epidemiology. [More]
Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

Sickle cell trait linked to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis among African American Soldiers

A new study published Aug. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine indicates that among African American U.S. Army Soldiers, sickle cell trait is not associated with an increase in mortality, but is associated with a modest increase in the risk of exertional rhabdomyolysis. [More]
Lower weight late in life linked to greater risk for Alzheimer's disease

Lower weight late in life linked to greater risk for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital have found an association between lower weight and more extensive deposits of the Alzheimer's-associated protein beta-amyloid in the brains of cognitively normal older individuals. [More]
Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease

According to a study carried out at the University of Helsinki, an infection of the root tip of a tooth increases the risk of coronary artery disease, even if the infection is symptomless. [More]
Paternal over-nutrition may lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction

Paternal over-nutrition may lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction

Paternal intake of a high-fat diet (HFD) can cause genetic changes that lead to generational obesity and metabolic dysfunction—including body weight and fat mass increases and changes in blood pressure, triglyceride levels and fat metabolism—in mice, according to Japanese researchers at Okayama University. [More]
Higher nut intake linked to lower levels of inflammatory biomarkers

Higher nut intake linked to lower levels of inflammatory biomarkers

In a cross-sectional analysis published online today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers looked at the association between habitual nut consumption and inflammatory biomarkers among 5,013 men and women participating in two ongoing prospective cohort studies: the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new dual-targeting drug candidate for treating diabetes and bone disease

TSRI scientists develop new dual-targeting drug candidate for treating diabetes and bone disease

In addition to its more obvious ills, type 2 diabetes is a condition closely associated with bone fractures, increasing the risk of fractures twofold. To make matters worse, certain anti-diabetic drugs further increase this risk, particularly in postmenopausal women, severely limiting their treatment options. [More]
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