Bone Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Bone Cancer News and Research

Bone cancer may be of two basic types 1. Primary bone cancer - cancer that begins in the bone, 2. Secondary bone cancer - cancer that begins elsewhere in the body (for example lungs, breast, liver etc.) that has spread to the bone. Primary bone cancer is a rare form of cancer - about 500 cases are diagnosed in the UK each year (only about one in every 500 cancers).
Researchers investigate distribution of trace elements in tissue of bone tumours

Researchers investigate distribution of trace elements in tissue of bone tumours

In a study that is the only one of its kind worldwide, researchers from the MedUni Vienna, the Vienna Technical University and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute have investigated the distribution of trace elements in the tissue of bone tumours. [More]
Cancer drug offers protection against thrombosis

Cancer drug offers protection against thrombosis

Case Western Reserve University researchers have discovered that an existing drug used to help cancer patients has the potential to protect thousands of others from the often-deadly impact of vascular clots. [More]
Scientists reproduce chromosomal modifications in human cells that cause certain cancer

Scientists reproduce chromosomal modifications in human cells that cause certain cancer

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) and the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol-gicas (CNIO) have succeeded in reproducing, in human cells, the chromosomal translocations that cause two types of cancer: acute myeloid leukemia and Ewing's sarcoma. [More]
Experimental antibody temporarily halts progression of neuroblastoma in children

Experimental antibody temporarily halts progression of neuroblastoma in children

Tumors shrank or disappeared and disease progression was temporarily halted in 15 children with advanced neuroblastoma enrolled in a safety study of an experimental antibody produced at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. [More]
Alteration in tumor suppressor gene TP53 plays key role early in development of bone cancer

Alteration in tumor suppressor gene TP53 plays key role early in development of bone cancer

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital-Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project found mutations in the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in 90 percent of osteosarcomas, suggesting the alteration plays a key role early in development of the bone cancer. [More]
Chordoma Foundation grants $75,000 to support development of new mouse model for bone cancer research

Chordoma Foundation grants $75,000 to support development of new mouse model for bone cancer research

The Chordoma Foundation has made a seed grant of $75,000 to Adrienne Flanagan, M.D., Ph.D., of University College, London, and her Jackson Laboratory collaborator, Mike Sasner, Ph.D., to develop a new mouse model for chordoma, a difficult-to-treat bone cancer affecting the skull and spine. [More]
Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists move a step closer to preserving fertility in young boys with cancer

Scientists have moved a step closer to being able to preserve fertility in young boys who undergo chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer. The new research, published in Fertility and Sterility, the journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, addresses the safety of an option scientists are developing for boys who aren't sexually mature and cannot bank sperm. [More]
Longer looks: The 'making of Obamacare;' unlocking an autistic son's secrets; antibiotics and the obesity epidemic

Longer looks: The 'making of Obamacare;' unlocking an autistic son's secrets; antibiotics and the obesity epidemic

If you walk into a farm-supply store today, you're likely to find a bag of antibiotic powder that claims to boost the growth of poultry and livestock. That's because decades of agricultural research has shown that antibiotics seem to flip a switch in young animals' bodies, helping them pack on pounds. Manufacturers brag about the miraculous effects of feeding antibiotics to chicks and nursing calves. Dusty agricultural journals attest to the ways in which the drugs can act like a kind of superfood to produce cheap meat. But what if that meat is us? (Pagan Kennedy, 3/8). [More]
Skin cancer may increase risk of other cancers later in life

Skin cancer may increase risk of other cancers later in life

Australian author on the paper, Professor Rodney Sinclair, Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne and Director of Dermatology at Epworth HealthCare said that the risk decreased significantly with increasing age, but it remains higher compared with individuals who have never had NMSC. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers use lung cancer drug to shrink chordoma in mice

Johns Hopkins researchers use lung cancer drug to shrink chordoma in mice

Johns Hopkins researchers say that a drug approved to treat lung cancer substantially shrank tumors in mice that were caused by a rare form of bone cancer called chordoma. [More]
Cancer survival rates still vary widely between European countries

Cancer survival rates still vary widely between European countries

Cancer survival still varies widely between European countries despite major improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment during the first decade of the 21st century, according to the latest EUROCARE-5 reports covering over 50% of the adult and 77% of the childhood population of Europe. [More]
Two related genes underlie development of two rare bone tumours in nearly 100% of patients

Two related genes underlie development of two rare bone tumours in nearly 100% of patients

Scientists have made a rare discovery that allows them to attribute two types of tumour almost entirely to specific mutations that lie in two related genes. [More]
Research: Neurotoxin provides more relief from pain in dogs with bone cancer

Research: Neurotoxin provides more relief from pain in dogs with bone cancer

By the time bone cancer is diagnosed in a pet dog, it is often too late to save the animal's life. Instead, the goal of treatment is to keep the dog as comfortable and free of pain as possible for as long as possible. [More]
Winners of VCCircle Healthcare Awards announced

Winners of VCCircle Healthcare Awards announced

The event recognised medical professionals who have not only scaled in terms of clinical and financial performance but also played a role in making a difference in patients' lives. [More]
ATSP-7041 stapled peptide activates p53, suppresses tumor growth in animal models

ATSP-7041 stapled peptide activates p53, suppresses tumor growth in animal models

Aileron Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company that is developing first-in-class therapeutics based on its proprietary Stapled Peptide drug platform, announced today the publication of preclinical data on ATSP-7041, a potent and selective stapled peptide re-activator of the wild type p53 tumor suppressor protein. [More]
Absence of Shp-2 enzyme near cartilage cells can lead to multiple benign cartilage tumors in mice

Absence of Shp-2 enzyme near cartilage cells can lead to multiple benign cartilage tumors in mice

Rhode Island Hospital researchers have found that the absence of the Shp-2 enzyme near specialized cartilage cells can lead to the development of multiple benign cartilage tumors in mice, a model that recapitulates the rare human tumor syndrome metachondromatosis. [More]
Study shows disrupted micronuclei may prove to be a valuable tool for detecting cancer

Study shows disrupted micronuclei may prove to be a valuable tool for detecting cancer

​Scientists studying cancer development have known about micronuclei for some time. These erratic, small extra nuclei, which contain fragments or whole chromosomes that were not incorporated into daughter cells after cell division, are associated with specific forms of cancer and are predictive of poorer prognosis. [More]
Disrupted micronuclei might play more active role in carcinogenesis, new study finds

Disrupted micronuclei might play more active role in carcinogenesis, new study finds

Scientists studying cancer development have known about micronuclei for some time. These erratic, small extra nuclei, which contain fragments or whole chromosomes that were not incorporated into daughter cells after cell division, are associated with specific forms of cancer and are predictive of poorer prognosis. [More]
NUS researchers develop highly realistic 3-D tumor model to track progress of drug therapy

NUS researchers develop highly realistic 3-D tumor model to track progress of drug therapy

A team of NUS researchers from the Departments of Bioengineering and Orthopaedic Surgery has developed a highly realistic three-dimensional (3-D) tumour model. As it replicates the conditions in the body, it is able to track the effectiveness and progress of drug therapy. [More]
Ultrasound targeted to painful bone metastases brings significant relief with tolerable side effects

Ultrasound targeted to painful bone metastases brings significant relief with tolerable side effects

A high-dose of ultrasound targeted to painful bone metastases appears to quickly bring patients relief, and with largely tolerable side effects, according to new research presented by Fox Chase Cancer Center scientists at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology on Monday, June 3. [More]